Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Funkthulhu

Pot Size vs Palm Size & Growth

Recommended Posts

Funkthulhu

It is springtime, and a man's fancy turns towards thoughts of repotting his container ranch...  

Let's be straight here, I'm in Nebraska, I have some "big" palm species creeping past the juvenile stage. . . and my ceilings are only 8 feet high right now.  Container Ranchers, how do you decide how big of a pot you will use for each of your species.  Assuming everything is deep enough for tap-roots and whatnot, does the pot size help or hinder the size of your palm?  In my most recent post I was talking about a potentially sick Veitchia, that little guy is getting a growth spurt right now.  Save for the freezing winters, if it were outside it has the potential to get freakin' huge.  I don't want it to be freakin' huge.  In fact, I'd like to keep it relatively unchanged for the foreseeable future.  They say a goldfish will grow to the size of its tank, but that's just hooey.  A goldfish keeps growing depending on how much food it gets and how long it lives, sometimes despite being too big for its tank.

I guess what I'm asking is this:  In your experience does a larger pot equal a larger palm?  Does a larger pot equal a faster growing palm?  And by reversal, does a smaller pot keep a palm smaller for longer?  

I don't want to end up with sickly stunted trees, but something that doesn't burst through the roof in a few years would be nice.  It means I get to enjoy my palms longer than I would normally in my apartment.  If that means I delay or even never increase the pot size for some of these species, I want to make sure I'm not doing them undue harm.

Cheers!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pal Meir

At least e.g. these two Lytos don’t mind their relatively small pots: :greenthumb:B)

770415665_N13012019-04-01P1050100.thumb.jpg.e0b06391efdd0367bed4c06861286eb3.jpg

1098598652_N14012019-02-14P1050052.thumb.jpg.255297010627df60f4b3a060e620dcaa.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pal Meir

… or this Arenga, too:

446172372_Arengaengleriryukyuensis2008-06-12.thumb.jpg.ebb8bded2af765c0004c9747aee662d0.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Funkthulhu

Wow. . . okay, my pots are all way bigger than either of those.  And some are bigger than those ceramics as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pal Meir

These pots were also relatively small, I think:

1786017336_Chamaeropshumilis1989-09-07.thumb.jpg.f11156c7053f74588ed90b9b44bdd7ff.jpg

229953247_Livistonachinensis1989-09-07.thumb.jpg.8c8e205c85f57febcf5ce7dfb9681667.jpg

1567512604_Washingtonia1989-09-07.thumb.jpg.c10353b177774ca1f4f012b5b76780fa.jpg

1570392008_Phoenixroebelenii2008-09-27IMG_1524.thumb.jpg.9639d6f6fb83cb1b9d029c2e41e57f4f.jpg

1554627338_Phoenixrupicola2008-09-16.thumb.jpg.0b12ff933886b0c6a9e09e7c8b5d39bd.jpg

And this Lodoicea seedling was also planted in a tiny pot:

775157165_Lodoicea73N05-0203.thumb.jpg.e9907665cc50c0418acae54ab6787c4e.jpg

Cocos nucifera HD 1977.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fusca
1 hour ago, Pal Meir said:

At least e.g. these two Lytos don’t mind their relatively small pots:

Pal, your potted palms always look fantastic.  :)  Keeping them in smaller pots when so large requires almost daily watering, is that right?  And haven't you also done some palms as bonsai? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pal Meir
7 minutes ago, Fusca said:

Pal, your potted palms always look fantastic.  :)  Keeping them in smaller pots when so large requires almost daily watering, is that right?  And haven't you also done some palms as bonsai? 

Yes, watering was/is the main problem ……

Here a couple of bonsai examples:

1939435360_Chamaeropshumilisargentea2015-04-14.thumb.jpg.69850d2eccff3c8d5e63580ad5188bd8.jpg

1154811731_Twagner2011-03-23IMG_5451.thumb.jpg.48a1b7e3b5c0b7b76e5e6c2e240eb1ec.jpg

2146442397_N13012019-04-01P1050100090.thumb.jpg.6b7d197ae5f95ae6ef0e5095051450f1.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pal Meir

The Trachy bonsai was planted in ground in 2014 (the one on the left):

1558907287_Twagner2019-04-10IMG_9606.thumb.jpg.dc505b789377a7445d79bc48c8e8cb99.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fusca
3 hours ago, Funkthulhu said:

something that doesn't burst through the roof in a few years would be nice.

Pal's bonsai palms look very cool - maybe that's an option for you in Nebraska.  I have no idea how this is done but I'd be interested in trying this sometime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rickybobby
8 hours ago, Funkthulhu said:

It is springtime, and a man's fancy turns towards thoughts of repotting his container ranch...  

Let's be straight here, I'm in Nebraska, I have some "big" palm species creeping past the juvenile stage. . . and my ceilings are only 8 feet high right now.  Container Ranchers, how do you decide how big of a pot you will use for each of your species.  Assuming everything is deep enough for tap-roots and whatnot, does the pot size help or hinder the size of your palm?  In my most recent post I was talking about a potentially sick Veitchia, that little guy is getting a growth spurt right now.  Save for the freezing winters, if it were outside it has the potential to get freakin' huge.  I don't want it to be freakin' huge.  In fact, I'd like to keep it relatively unchanged for the foreseeable future.  They say a goldfish will grow to the size of its tank, but that's just hooey.  A goldfish keeps growing depending on how much food it gets and how long it lives, sometimes despite being too big for its tank.

I guess what I'm asking is this:  In your experience does a larger pot equal a larger palm?  Does a larger pot equal a faster growing palm?  And by reversal, does a smaller pot keep a palm smaller for longer?  

I don't want to end up with sickly stunted trees, but something that doesn't burst through the roof in a few years would be nice.  It means I get to enjoy my palms longer than I would normally in my apartment.  If that means I delay or even never increase the pot size for some of these species, I want to make sure I'm not doing them undue harm.

Cheers!

Awesome questions I’m interested in the feedback 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jimmyt

In the tradition of bonsai, you can keep large plants small by placing them in small pots.  This limits their growth.  Not all plants will tolerate Bonsai style growing though.  I suspect the roots on these palms will find their way out of the drain holes eventually and need to be trimmed back.  The main palm like plant that is kept as a Bonsai are cycads from my observations.   I have found that bonsai pots surface area to total volume is larger than standard larger pots and they do dry/transpire faster making them require more frequent watering.  Just my 2 1/2 cents worth.

 

jimmyt  :unsure:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • Funkthulhu
      By Funkthulhu
      Playing around with some lists.  Made this one of all my pots in house.  Aside from some randos I picked up in Florida and got to sprout, I have identified most all of them! Granted, I had to go back through a bunch of old message and figure out what the heck @DoomsDave and others have mailed to me over the years.  But even the store-boughts are not guarantees until you see how they look when they get older.  Not a long list, but pretty good for this hobbyist and his little shared ranch.
      Adonidia merrillii
      Agave americana
      Aloe rubroviolacea(?)
      Aloe noideaensis
      Alpinia galanga
      Ananas comosus
      Archontophoenix tuckerii (2)
      Caryota mitis (fishtail)
      Chamaedorea cataractarem (big spread)
      Chamaedorea costaricana (bamboo-looking thin palm)
      Chamaedorea elegans
      Chamaedorea radicalis
      Citrus x sinensis (blood orange, maybe meyer lemon? 5 years old, flower soon?)
      Coccoloba uvifera (sea grape)
      Codiaeum veriegatum (croton)
      Curcuma longa
      Cycas revoluta
      Dracaena deremensis
      Dypsis lutescens(90% sure?)
      Dypsis plumosa (3 seedlings w/buried pot)
      Echeveria derenbergii(??)
      Echeveria wtf-ia
      Phoenix roebelenii
      Ravenea rivularis
      Trithrinax brasiliensis var acanthacoma (in the tiki-sign pot)
      Veitchia arecina(?)
      Zingiber officinale
      Still waiting on positive ID for some of those Florida randos; one of which has nearly 5 foot fronds and I think is a brand of cane palm?  But no trunk yet and recovering from a die-back, so I'm not ready to call it...  (also I have no clue what I'm doing)  There's also a lot of "stuff I was eating" like the ginger, citrus seeds, etc. that just got planted at some point.
      Some of the bigger pots like the succulents, Majesty, cycad, and pygmy date go outside in the summer.  But most of these are always indoors, and now that I have lots of windows I don't even need grow lights.  I'm not going to say they're all super healthy and loving the dry indoor Nebraska winter, but they're all still alive (so far).
      What do you have?
    • Funkthulhu
      By Funkthulhu
      I received some seed from @DoomsDave last year and even after moving and cats and everything else, I still have two seedlings left.  They're a deep green, and seem very healthy.  
      However!  In giving them a deep soak today I noticed that there are new tiny little spears coming up from the edge of the stem, not the center...  Then I did some research to find that C. mitis is a Tillering palm!  
      So, now I'm a bit worried.  They're in a rather small pot right now, and they only have 3 or 4 leaves each.  How big of a pot do I need for these?  Or, more importantly, how deep to accommodate the tillering of this species?  (while we're at it, what soil composition do they prefer, as I assume I'll be repotting?) 
      Cheers!

    • Funkthulhu
      By Funkthulhu
      I'm moving again.  Finally back into a house, not an apartment, with floor to ceiling windows on the East side, smaller high windows elsewhere.  However, I'm now going to be sharing space with my beloved.  As much as she would probably let me, I can't bring myself to hoard all of our space with palm trees.  I have all that space in front of East windows, but I also have to take into account the big pots outside that will need to come inside in the next couple months.  
      I have a number of "winners", like my oldest palms, my dwarf date, my wild collected Veitchia, and several others that are happy and healthy.  However, I also have about a dozen pots of seedlings in various states of development, containers of unsprouted seeds, and just rando that has potential but hasn't shown any initiative.  How do you choose?  There isn't enough room for everything, some of this HAS to go!  I've always had a mind-set of "if you live, I'll make space for you", but I seem to be hitting a wall against that.  
      /rant, thanks for reading, any advice or personal anecdotes would be appreciated. 
    • Funkthulhu
      By Funkthulhu
      I have a couple juvenile palms in a large-ish (3 or 4 gallon? bottom watering reservoir) pot in my apartment.  North facing window, but it's a full patio door.  These guys have rarely seen full sun and have been slowly chugging away for about 7 years (since seeds were collected in 2012).  Now, the largest of the 3 in this pot has started thickening around the bottom (still narrower than my wrist) and its top-most frond almost touched my 8 foot ceiling before arcing over to hang a good 6-7 feet at its highest.  No changes to heat, light, water, or fertilizer in the last 3 years.
      This winter it seems that the fronds are "fading".  Or that they're edging into a lighter green, to an almost grayish green, but still not on the edge of yellow.  I'm concerned because other than the color of the fronds, the plant looks really healthy and, as said above, the main trunk is starting to bulk up a bit.  Should I be worried? 
      For reference, I believe this to be a Veitchia arecina, based on visual inspection of the mother tree, fruits collected and sprouted, and the look of the plant now.
    • Funkthulhu
      By Funkthulhu
      Lots of rain last week, saw there was a potential for frost this week, so I spent Sunday afternoon bringing them in.  Washed pots and saucers, drained them all from being waterlogged all week, and topped up on soil for a couple.  Every year I tell myself there is no more room, and every year I end up with a couple more pots... 
      Library (only west-facing window)
       
      Bedroom (north facing) 

      Living room (north facing) 

       
      Was quite blustery last night, had some brief sleet and more rain, so I guess I made the right choice.  Just looked at the weather again and we have a full on Freeze Warning tonight!  (Guess I better go over to my friend's house and dig up my Musa basjoo while I still can...)
×
×
  • Create New...