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NC_Palms

New Orleans palm photos

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NC_Palms

I spent the past few days exploring the city of New Orleans and all the palms here.  

 

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Phoenix dactylifera near the Riverwalk

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More Phoenix dactylifera on the corner between Canal Street and Bourbon.  

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Rows of Phoenix dactylifera at City Park. 

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Large trunking Chamaerops humilis at Jackson Square in the French Quarter

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Many of the Chamaerops were flowering. 

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Washingtonias, Sabal palmetto and some type of Sygarus (hybrid?) at the New Orleans Botanical Gardens

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Cyrtostachys renda in the tropical rainforest greenhouse at the New Orleans Botanical Gardens

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Phoenix canariensis and Livinstonia chinensis in the French Quarter

 

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kinzyjr

A lot of nice stuff!

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Rickybobby

Awesome !

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bubba

Hope you also hit Central Grocery (muflata invented here) and Cafe Dumond. Did you see any Queens? They dominated last time I was in NO!

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Walt

I was at the 1971 (February) Mardi Gras. Back then there wasn't a phoenix dactilifera to be found in New Orleans.

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PalmTreeDude

I love Phoenix dactylifera! They are up there on my list of favorite palms. New Orleans seems to have a palm friendly climate, it must benefit a lot from Lake Pontchartrain. 

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bubba

If nobody gonna tell me about the status of Nawlins Queen Palms, I guess I will reach out to my friend, who is a yat...

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NC_Palms

@PalmTreeDude Nola has a zone 9b climate, which I think is comparable to central Florida. I wouldn’t be surprised if a cold 10a microclimate existed somewhere in Louisiana. Louisiana would definitely be a fun place to experiment growing different types of palms in. 

@bubba I definitely saw a bunch of queens in Nola, but P. dactylifera were definitely more common. I just didn’t get any photos of them to share. 

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Walt
9 hours ago, bubba said:

If nobody gonna tell me about the status of Nawlins Queen Palms, I guess I will reach out to my friend, who is a yat...

Saw nary a queen palm in New Orleans when I was there for 3 days during February Mardi Gras (when my navy ship steamed up there from Key West, where it was home ported). Of course, I was mostly drunk, traversing and milling around in the streets (with the crowds) drinking Hurricanes and Dixie beer.  But, no doubt the climate in New Orleans, especially in microclimate areas could have supported queen palms. No doubt at all with regard to P. dactilyfera.

Same thing for Charleston, S.C. When I first reported for navy duty in Charleston, I drove all over the historic part. Never saw one queen palm. Did see some W. robusta and only one P. canariensis  and maybe one or two trachies. But things have changed there for the better in the last 51 years.

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Matthew92

I recently was looking on streetview for queens in New Orleans, and there are (or were) a good number of them- but they were more concentrated in certain areas or tucked into courtyards- so I could see how one may not have noticed them if you didn't visit multiple areas in the city.

Jan 2018 did a number on them- not sure exactly how many actually died. If you look at aerial view on Google Earth you can see their brown fronds as the current images were taken during that month. 

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bubba

Dixie beer, Muffulettas from the Central Grocery and more queen palms....

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PalmTreeDude

Anyone think an Archontophoenix cunninghamiana would grow in a good location in New Orleans? 

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Walt
56 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Anyone think an Archontophoenix cunninghamiana would grow in a good location in New Orleans? 

I think a Archontophoenix cunninghamiana, if it was sited up against the north wall (where it would get full sun from its south side) of a tall concrete, heat absorbing building, with also a building on the west side, it may well survive.  The building on the north and west sides should effectively block the cold front winds which generally come from the N.W.  Both buildings would absorb radiant heat from the sun during the day, then re release the heat at night.  If there was concrete, swimming pool in this area, all the better.  Even if the pool wasn't heated in the winter, but water left in the pool, the heat from the water should help. This scenario would basically be a microclimate. 

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cm05

Nice photos, I’ve always wanted to go there.

Palms really work to liven up any kind of scenery.

Edited by cm05
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NC_Palms
On 4/19/2019 at 10:36 PM, cm05 said:

Nice photos, I’ve always wanted to go there.

Palms really work to liven up any kind of scenery.

NOLA is definitely a fun city. I hope to go back one day. 

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