Jump to content
RyManUtah

Nevada - surprise filifera

Recommended Posts

RyManUtah

Surprise filiferas in a canyon made an amazing sunset on our hike. Wanted to share. 

 

(Growing in a dry wash in the Mojave Desert.)3F29BD03-D750-48EE-B043-E98C27F0D3EB_zps

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

@Ryagra Very nice find.  I have a pair of filifera here in pots.  I hope they survive long enough to look like those you found in the desert.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah

@kinzyjr thank you! They thrive here, it just surprised me as it was nowhere near water. I’m excited for you. They’re growth rate is pretty impressive! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmTreeDude

Where in Nevada are these? I heard that people debate whether or not they are native to Nevada, and this image definitely supports them being native there. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah

@PalmTreeDude

These were in a canyon hiking down (west) off of Mormon Mesa toward Moapa Valley / Overton. North of Lake Mead. I may be able to find a map pin if you need more specificity. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

I believe mine were from a Moapa Valley, NV seed source.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xerarch
6 hours ago, Ryagra said:

@PalmTreeDude

These were in a canyon hiking down (west) off of Mormon Mesa toward Moapa Valley / Overton. North of Lake Mead. I may be able to find a map pin if you need more specificity. 

Moapa is where they are supposed to be native if indeed they are. 

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah
43 minutes ago, Xerarch said:

Moapa is where they are supposed to be native if indeed they are. 

That is cool. It’s pretry similar to in climate / terrain to the palm canyons area. It’s a probable theory. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NC_Palms

W. filifera is one of my favorite species of palm. Thanks for sharing!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah
26 minutes ago, NC_Palms said:

W. filifera is one of my favorite species of palm. Thanks for sharing!

Anytime! I enjoy them as well. They have an impressive growth rate / size! 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Josue Diaz

Very cool, thanks for sharing. It makes me wonder how far Washingtonia's range spread northward historically. There is a grove of filifera at the mouth of the Kern River Canyon east of Bakersfield. I've always wondered how they got there, given that filifera's range is believed to be limited to the extreme southern portion of California. This grove near Bakersfield has 60 or more very old filifera and plenty of juvenile plants. Washingtonia filifera isn't exactly what you think of when you hear of Sierra Nevada vegetation. 

https://www.google.com/maps/@35.4414968,-118.7932905,3a,53.8y,300.28h,89.82t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1scNqvmQLDc7KTa_jHH2CxWA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Capture.thumb.PNG.b9f69ba69bf269f6464a9b9f6d2693cd.PNG

Edited by Josue Diaz
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah
2 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

Very cool, thanks for sharing. It makes me wonder how far Washingtonia's range spread northward historically. There is a grove of filifera at the mouth of the Kern River Canyon east of Bakersfield. I've always wondered how they got there, given that filifera's range is believed to be limited to the extreme southern portion of California. This grove near Bakersfield has 60 or more very old filifera and plenty of juvenile plants. Washingtonia filifera isn't exactly what you think of when you hear of Sierra Nevada vegetation. 

https://www.google.com/maps/@35.4414968,-118.7932905,3a,53.8y,300.28h,89.82t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1scNqvmQLDc7KTa_jHH2CxWA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Capture.thumb.PNG.b9f69ba69bf269f6464a9b9f6d2693cd.PNG

Isn’t it a wonder? Isolated groups make me happy. Thanks for sharing ! 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmTreeDude

I bet birds are good at spreading these, I would assume they would nest near water sources. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah
8 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

I bet birds are good at spreading these, I would assume they would nest near water sources. 

I think so too. That’s a lot of why they grow out of sidewalks around telephone poles and the like. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Chance

I have been to an area out that way when I lived in Vegas. There was a spring and it was surrounded by palms in the middle of nowhere north of Lake Mead. I always figured they must be native to that area. It was over ten years ago since I went there but I remember it was an amazing place and the water was so warm and clear. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah
59 minutes ago, Chris Chance said:

I have been to an area out that way when I lived in Vegas. There was a spring and it was surrounded by palms in the middle of nowhere north of Lake Mead. I always figured they must be native to that area. It was over ten years ago since I went there but I remember it was an amazing place and the water was so warm and clear. 

True serenity at its finest. Love finding those areas! Springs in the desert make my heart happy! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bubba

Great find! Those Washingtonia f. in their native habitat in Ca., Az.and Nv. are amazing. Makes me wonder if there could  be some in hidden canyons in Utah!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah
3 hours ago, bubba said:

Great find! Those Washingtonia f. in their native habitat in Ca., Az.and Nv. are amazing. Makes me wonder if there could  be some in hidden canyons in Utah!

That’s be awesome! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
7 hours ago, Ryagra said:

That’s be awesome! 

Actually... according to SEINet data, there was a collection of filifera made from a seep near the Virgin River, north of St George back in 1987.  Coordinates via the SEINet voucher are as follows:  37. 3375 -113.522  Approx 1 mile east of Beaver Dam, or.. looking over Google earth, N. W. of both Burger and Signal Peaks in the Red Cliffs Nat. Conservation Area. No clue if the specimen they'd collected off is still there but interesting to say the least.. If it (  ..and perhaps others ) are still growing there, and DNA analysis were to confirm it, this might be the northern-most locality of a naturally -growing specimen / population that has been documented, thus far. 



 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah
1 hour ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Actually... according to SEINet data, there was a collection of filifera made from a seep near the Virgin River, north of St George back in 1987.  Coordinates via the SEINet voucher are as follows:  37. 3375 -113.522  Approx 1 mile east of Beaver Dam, or.. looking over Google earth, N. W. of both Burger and Signal Peaks in the Red Cliffs Nat. Conservation Area. No clue if the specimen they'd collected off is still there but interesting to say the least.. If it (  ..and perhaps others ) are still growing there, and DNA analysis were to confirm it, this might be the northern-most locality of a naturally -growing specimen / population that has been documented, thus far. 



 

Interesting, indeed! Can you direct me where I can read more about it? I’ll have to go check it out. Wild palms fascinate me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, Ryagra said:

Interesting, indeed! Can you direct me where I can read more about it? I’ll have to go check it out. Wild palms fascinate me. 

All i did was type in "Washingtonia filifera SEINet"   Then when you enter their portal, you'll see a map on the lower right hand side of the page. Click on it and you should see all the points where sampled /photographed / vouchered specimens have been documented..  The only thing they had picture-wise for that particular entry was samples of some leaves / etc. that had been collected and placed in a herbarium.  Would be cool if someone was able to re-locate this specimen.. ( perhaps any others not documented that far north ) with both photos and more collection samples..

Overall, SEINet is a pretty accurate / reliable resource w/ some of the info in their database going back several decades.. Many well known Naturalists / Botanists, etc have made valuable contributions there..

I also surf  Inaturalist's database when looking up stuff..  Many, more recent entries / observations there though it seems some of the observations posted aren't always as closely evaluated for accuracy at times. Have noticed, for example, some entries for Washingtonia filifera as being W. robustra, ( Observation posted from Santa Barbra County ) or a Brahea sp. ( another observation made from Sinaloa, Mexico ) in a couple cases..     Still, a valuable resource.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah
13 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

All i did was type in "Washingtonia filifera SEINet"   Then when you enter their portal, you'll see a map on the lower right hand side of the page. Click on it and you should see all the points where sampled /photographed / vouchered specimens have been documented..  The only thing they had picture-wise for that particular entry was samples of some leaves / etc. that had been collected and placed in a herbarium.  Would be cool if someone was able to re-locate this specimen.. ( perhaps any others not documented that far north ) with both photos and more collection samples..

Thank you! I stayed up way too late fiddling around with this. The site is fascinating! Their coordinates for the Utah palm put that at a pretty high elevation. Such a specimen could be extremely valuable in a DNA pool for northern growers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
3 minutes ago, Ryagra said:

Thank you! I stayed up way too late fiddling around with this. The site is fascinating! Their coordinates for the Utah palm put that at a pretty high elevation. Such a specimen could be extremely valuable in a DNA pool for northern growers. 

:greenthumb:   Lol, i hear ya.. Been many nights where i sat in bed looking up stuff on SEINet or Intauralist until i fell asleep. While, Inaturalist is more citizen-oriented,  thus some of the miss -identification / inclusion of cultivated specimen observations ( mainly w/ plants ) you'll find posted when researching there, plenty of factual info to gain. Plus, it helps foster interest in X  area of Science.  The site has also turned up several surprise discoveries.. One involving an apparent range expansion of a Fiddler Crab sp. along the coast of S. Cal. that many assumed couldn't survive / hadn't been observed much further north of Ensanada, in Baja.

As far as filifera is concerned, Totally agree that if that specimen, or others that might exist in that area, are still there, i have to believe they'd likely possess some sort of extra cold tolerance..  I'd imagine that area gets snow, at least a few times each winter?? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah
2 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

:greenthumb:   Lol, i hear ya.. Been many nights where i sat in bed looking up stuff on SEINet or Intauralist until i fell asleep. While, Inaturalist is more citizen-oriented,  thus some of the miss -identification / inclusion of cultivated specimen observations ( mainly w/ plants ) you'll find posted when researching there, plenty of factual info to gain. Plus, it helps foster interest in X  area of Science.  The site has also turned up several surprise discoveries.. One involving an apparent range expansion of a Fiddler Crab sp. along the coast of S. Cal. that many assumed couldn't survive / hadn't been observed much further north of Ensanada, in Baja.

As far as filifera is concerned, Totally agree that if that specimen, or others that might exist in that area, are still there, i have to believe they'd likely possess some sort of extra cold tolerance..  I'd imagine that area gets snow, at least a few times each winter?? 

It’s a struggle. Sleep or plants? I will be utilizing these resources a lot! I’m definitely a novice plant nerd. Before the smart phone area I spent countless hours collecting books on different plants that peaked my interest, especially things native to the mojave and Great Basin. 

 

Indeed it would. When life allots me some more feeetime during the day, I want to take a trip up there for sure. Yes, it would definitely be safe to assume that location would possessive some super cold hardiness if a specimen is still thriving. 

This is a current photo from this week. The coordinates would put the elevation close to the current snow line. 

This is looking north to Burger from the Virgin River. I’m standing at about 2800’. Although, being a south facing and on a slope, it would be a safe assumption that is isn’t succumbed to the cold air sinks the valley and city get on occasion. When it gets cold fast, the cold air doesn’t drain down the gorge fast enough for the radiant heat to reward the next morning. It happens a couple of times a decade. It could be a safe zone from this at that elevation, however, significantly more snowfall. 

D8FCEA9C-459F-4A1B-907D-1DDDA740E47F.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona
48 minutes ago, Ryagra said:

It’s a struggle. Sleep or plants? I will be utilizing these resources a lot! I’m definitely a novice plant nerd. Before the smart phone area I spent countless hours collecting books on different plants that peaked my interest, especially things native to the mojave and Great Basin. 

:lol: Agree.. Was the same way before phones / internet. Books, and lots of trips to the Library to read books i didn't have, let alone lots of time hiking through pretty much all of the hills surrounding San Jose / Santa Cruz.. ..And that was before moving out of state, the first time.. Interesting to read through some of those books and see what changes have been made to a species name / range / etc.  At the other end of the spectrum, it was sad to see areas where i'd encountered hard to find plants developed at that time. Even contributed information for an Environmental Impact Report to help try and stop development of a Golf Course on a site where several rare / threatened plant / animal species had been documented near where i grew up in San Jose.  It should have been designated open space, or sold to the County Parks dept.  Is what it is though sometimes..

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah

Another isolated bunch of filifera soaking up some ground water. Could not contact the property owner, but got as close as I could without trespassing. 

17350108-561E-4287-9BA2-DD62ABF81B7C.jpeg

E188CF8B-ED7F-4CA3-8EDD-55DDC3478BA9.jpeg

C176F9E5-03A2-4A81-993D-6575573CCF09.jpeg

2A008A6D-5E40-4AEE-B619-DFEB675EC534.jpeg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • Eric Thompson
      By Eric Thompson
      Hi folks just put up another video, stop on by if you have a chance. Basic seed germination as well as a look at my largest seed grown washy. 
      https://youtu.be/Cc1HQk7RtPw
    • Coasta
      By Coasta
      hello friends! 
       
      I am on a mission to find. Pure washingtonia robusta, preferably in arizona :). It seems like all of the ones I look at are Hybrids.   If anyone has an idea, that would be greatly appreciated. 
    • Coasta
      By Coasta
      hello everyone!! About a year ago I planted to palms from the same nursery. Before I purchased from this nursery I shopped around a lot to find the purest robustas. I noticed the smaller one is a bit hairier and I know that is a characteristic of a filifera, unless robustas are that hairy when they are young. If anyone could help me identify if the smaller one is a robusta, filibusta or filifera. I am hoping its a robusta, your expertise would be greatly appreciated. Also if anyone could confirm that the bigger one is a robusta. Thank you!





    • PalmTreeDude
      By PalmTreeDude
      So one of my Washingtonia robusta started to go yellow and then the edges went brown and it slowly died. Then, two of my other Washingtonia have started to do the same thing a while back, but are still alive. Now, my final healthy one is starting to show the very beginning stages (slight yellowing in the oldest leaf). Then some of my Saw palmetto seedlings started to show "symptoms" and now it seems like my Archontophoenix cunninghamiana is showing it a little bit, although it fortunately doesn't seem to be progressing much. I can't tell if this is some sort of disease (I don't understand how potted palms indoors in Virginia would get a palm disease) or if they have some sort of fungus. Should I completely soak them in copper fungicide? I'm not going to lie, I am kind of freaking out a bit. Any advice would be helpful. I am not new to growing palms indoors during the winter and have been watering them each as I believe they should be watered while indoors (for example, Washingtonia get the least amount of water, to prevent rot). What could this be? Can I save these? I never had this problem before. 


×
×
  • Create New...