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PalmatierMeg

Guihaia argyrata is flowering!

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PalmatierMeg

I was doing spring cleanup in my front Caribbean Garden and saw my Guihaia argyrata (not Caribbean, I know) is flowering. Unfortunately, this species is dioecious so whatever sex my little palm is, it lacks a partner. This dandy little palm hails from southern China and Vietnam where it grows on limestone cliffs. I have had mine for 10 years and this is the first year it has flowered. It is painfully slow growing but has had few problems over the years. In FL, it can't take full sun so this little guy lives happily as an understory palm beneath my many Coccothrinax. Since I bought it as a seedling around 2009 I have yet to see another G.a. for sale. I have tried germinating seeds with no luck (I understand seeds are difficult to germinate). It is supposed to be a clustering species but my palm is still solitary. The greenish yellow inflorescense rises from the center of the palm and is surrounded by a rosette of 6" long spines. Leaves are dark green, reduplicate and the backs have a silver-bronze scurf that glistens in bright light. Does anyone else have this palm? Please post photos.

Guihaia argyrata, Cape Coral, FL

Guihaia_argyrata_01_03-29-19.thumb.JPG.ba746f53274231ecd865ab2362577fd7.JPGGuihaia_argyrata_02_03-29-19.thumb.JPG.964dab488693c80ec01193fd5f9d36f3.JPGGuihaia_argyrata_03_03-29-19.thumb.JPG.c44ad7ae08c737bca2d028fbdad760ef.JPGGuihaia_argyrata_04_03-29-19.thumb.JPG.752390ebded1526456c3fc9f88110898.JPGGuihaia_argyrata_05_03-29-19.thumb.JPG.a68e1b2374a0132829ba9a04a82bd821.JPG

 

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Phoenikakias

It's a girl...

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PalmatierMeg

Thanks. Too bad she faces a lonely future.

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NatureGirl

Beautiful, very nicely grown.  I always wanted one of those....

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Pal Meir

Yours is even nicer than those in their habitat: :greenthumb:

1993714185_Guihaiaargyrata88N03-0136.thumb.jpg.db9dc5d9abf9a543c2e117b7915b115f.jpg

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Jeff Searle

Nice Meg! These are considered pretty rare in cultivation, especially in Florida.

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Cikas

Beautiful palm. I always wanted one. 

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BS Man about Palms

I have a pair I have kept in liners for years... they seem to be the same size they were when I got them!!!

 

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Palmarum

Congrats Meg,

That is quite the accomplishment. Before now I had yet to see a specimen in flower. I've had one, and my only one, purchased as a seedling in the mid-1990s and it has never flowered. It has always been in different pots as it would not like my soil as is. It slowly moves along, doing its thing. It is crowded with other plants and is hard to get a photo at the moment. I do know of an even larger one residing in a collection in Hollywood, FL. Last time I saw it, it was over 20 years ago and was huge even then. It resembled a hairy, fiber-full, dark green Coccothrinax at long distance. It was planted in the median between the street and sidewalk in line with other palms. The film photo I took of it, is mixed with a zillion others.

Ryan

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