Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Sabal_Louisiana

large Sabal Louisiana in habitat

Recommended Posts

Sabal_Louisiana

I took this pic last month near Lake Pontchartrain west of New Orleans.  Height is about 12 feet. Trunk is about 8' including crown. 

There are some I think even bigger in the vicinity but hard to get to in the swamp.

There used to be one on Bayou Savauge NWR in New Orleans East that must have been about 14 feet tall but it was destroyed in Hurricane Katrina. I wish I still had a picture of it.

image.jpg

Edited by Sabal_Louisiana
typo
  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr.SamuraiSword

wow! thats awesome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tropicdoc

Cool

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xerarch

Holy smokes that’s a legit trunk and on a minor! Wonder how old that is. I’ve often wondered why S. palmetto don’t range all along the gulf coast. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sabal_Louisiana

One theory as to why Sabal palmetto has not spread more east along the Gulf coast is that once every few hundred years a great arctic freeze comes along and devastates them because the brunt of most big arctic outbreaks tend to dive down into the South Central instead of the SE US (e.g. in 1899, 1989). acting as a barrier to slow but steady migration westward.

This sounds plausible but I am skeptical because S. palmetto is very cold hardy and if this was the case, they might not range as far north as North Carolina. Although I would have to say that recovery of decimated populations would be more likely along the SE Atlantic than the North central Gulf coast.

Edited by Sabal_Louisiana
typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Austinpalm

It seems likely that a few S. palmetto made it to the Western Gulf Coast at some point as genetic work on S. brazoriensis has shown it is more likely a hybrid of S. minor and S. palmetto than of S. minor and S. mexicana. This is particularly surprising as remnant populations of S. mexicana have apparently been located much farther north along the Texas coast  (Jackson County) than previously thought.

 

Great pix by the way.  I have seen similar (but smaller so far) palmetto near Houston.  

Edited by Austinpalm
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sabal_Louisiana

Here's a closer look at the trunks for the ones shown in the first pic.

20190224_144929.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Allen

That's some good looking trunks.  Now if I just live long enough for mine to look like that!!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×