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MattyB

Dypsis oropedionis seedlings are a nightmare

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MattyB

I'm not 100% sure these are D. oropedionis but that's what they were purchased as.  They came to me as 2 leaf seedlings 5-1/2 years ago!  One of the slowest and most problematic palms I've ever grown. I started with 75.  I now am down to about 10.  They just keep dying.  I just can't seem to get them to do well.  Any thoughts?  Anyone else have problems with small D. oropedionis?  Do you think these are D. oropedionis or some other mystery Dypsis?

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DoomsDave
24 minutes ago, MattyB said:

I'm not 100% sure these are D. oropedionis but that's what they were purchased as.  They came to me as 2 leaf seedlings 5-1/2 years ago!  One of the slowest and most problematic palms I've ever grown. I started with 75.  I now am down to about 10.  They just keep dying.  I just can't seem to get them to do well.  Any thoughts?  Anyone else have problems with small D. oropedionis?  Do you think these are D. oropedionis or some other mystery Dypsis?

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All I can say is you're not alone, though I killed my last of about 10 last year.

:crying:

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Tracy
1 hour ago, MattyB said:

They came to me as 2 leaf seedlings 5-1/2 years ago!

Sounds like a test of patients.  Based on your yield, if you ever get a couple to planting size they will be worth a lot:  5 years of water, the cost of the 5 seedlings, attention to them over those 5+ years, and wasted space you could have been growing other things!  Pricey!

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richnorm

I would plant them, even at that size.

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Matt in OC

Look about as awful as my super slow malcomberi hybrids. :sick:

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gilles06

For me all dypsis seedlings are difficult...

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mike in kurtistown

Agree with Richnorm. If you still have a few extra, try planting a couple in the ground, even if small. I have brought some species back from near death that way, but it didn't work with others. And I have a couple species that eventually grew well in pots, but declined in the ground. It's a crapshoot!

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Tyrone

Agree. I tried once in Perth and got a lot to come up from seed only to slaughter them all during the warmer weather. I think as a mountain species they just hate any heat. Would like to try them again maybe in some sort of cloud forest simulated setting in cooler Albany where I now live.

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Palm Tree Jim

Matty,

In a greenhouse?

How are you treating them?

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Darold Petty

MattyB, thanks for showing a real world aspect of palm growing.  I have had a lot of special seedlings die a slow, painful death.  Not a lot of success lately.  Anyway, persistence !  :greenthumb:

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Brett in Mission Viejo

For what it is worth, I planted mine out near a north facing wall (shaded out in the winter) as a 1 gallon 13 years ago and it survived the the infant mortality syndrome this species is known for.  My plant never really looks good though. Holds only 3-4 fronds and only the newest frond looks good progressing to the oldest frond very brown tipped and ugly. Seems to be sensitive to nutrient uptake issues, at least in my growing conditions. It may be a soil PH thing.  Anyone know what the soil PH is like in their native growing area?

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Hillizard
2 hours ago, Darold Petty said:

MattyB, thanks for showing a real world aspect of palm growing.  I have had a lot of special seedlings die a slow, painful death.  Not a lot of success lately.  Anyway, persistence !  :greenthumb:

I feel the collective 'pain' on this forum about the challenges of getting struggling palm seedlings to survive. I've had this sad Ceroxylon amazonicum for a couple of years now, but I won't give up on it. It was outside most of last year, but I brought it into my sunroom a few months ago and that might have given it a new lease on life, more or less. It's got a new spear just starting to show. Guess I'll have to keep it indoors from now on if I expect it to grow, if not thrive. All of my Adonidia merrillii 'yellow form' seedlings died this winter in my unheated sunroom that sometimes dipped into the 40s F. overnight. :unsure:

CeroxylonAmazonicum.png

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quaman58

Years ago when they were last available as seedlings from Floribunda, I got a dozen or so. They seemed pretty durable for a number of months, then just started slowly damping off. After a couple years, when I was down to my last one, I asked a friend to greenhouse it for me, which he kindly did. I couldn't believe it was the same plant when I got it back. It's now in the ground & seems fine. Whether it was the year round warmth or his fertilization that did the trick, I have no idea. Tricky little things, as a lot of larger Dypsis are.

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richnorm
5 hours ago, Brett in Mission Viejo said:

For what it is worth, I planted mine out near a north facing wall (shaded out in the winter) as a 1 gallon 13 years ago and it survived the the infant mortality syndrome this species is known for.  My plant never really looks good though. Holds only 3-4 fronds and only the newest frond looks good progressing to the oldest frond very brown tipped and ugly. Seems to be sensitive to nutrient uptake issues, at least in my growing conditions. It may be a soil PH thing.  Anyone know what the soil PH is like in their native growing area?

Not sure about habitat but I have a trio doing really well on a clay bank with plenty of sun and high rainfall.   They are super dark green yet I never use anything stronger than mulch on them. 

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LJG

This is a high plateau palm, and what I have found in my DG, those iron rich soils of the high plateau need to be accounted for by adding chelated iron in cultivation. Mine has been in the ground for almost 10 years and always looked terrible. Last year I started iron year round and the last leaf looks heathy and green. Might be worth a try for you. 

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MattyB

Thanks for the input guys.  

Palm Tree Jim, yeah they're in a greenhouse, but it's open once the weather is decent, so basically a shade house.  That said, I do get very warm here inland and they do not like that.  I'm gonna try to plant one out in filtered light and see if I can at least save one.

Thanks,

Matt

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Darold Petty

MattyB,  If this palm resents warmth, then you should send them to me at the 'Coldest Frost Free' microclimate in California !!   :mrlooney:  

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Palm Tree Jim
2 hours ago, MattyB said:

Thanks for the input guys.  

Palm Tree Jim, yeah they're in a greenhouse, but it's open once the weather is decent, so basically a shade house.  That said, I do get very warm here inland and they do not like that.  I'm gonna try to plant one out in filtered light and see if I can at least save one.

Thanks,

Matt

OK.

Keep us updated on how the one in the ground does for you.

Perhaps, they are a difficult grow for us here in Southern California at this seedling stage.

Good luck!

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