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PalmTreeDude

In Need of Small Watering Can (For Seed Starting)

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PalmTreeDude

Hello, I am in need of a small watering can for indoor plants that I'll use for seed starting. All of my watering cans and stuff that I water with that I have turn up the soil even when I water lightly and can put the seeds at the top and mess everything up. Does anyone know of a small watering can that has a light stream that I can use for seed starting? 

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Kim

Maybe try a spray bottle with an adjustable nozzle -- from a fine mist to a direct stream and everything in between. If you have acres of indoor plants that may be too labor intensive.

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PalmTreeDude
On 2/15/2019 at 3:42 PM, Kim said:

Maybe try a spray bottle with an adjustable nozzle -- from a fine mist to a direct stream and everything in between. If you have acres of indoor plants that may be too labor intensive.

I have a spray bottle, but it never seems to penetrate deep into the soil. I tested this out with a normal watering can and a spray bottle with the same amount of water, the water sprayed from the spray bottle only went about a half an inch deep in the soil while the watering can with the same amount went all the way to the bottom. I am not sure why this happens. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude

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SHEP

I have two watering cans (plastic) that have a screwable rose (the nozzle) so it doesn't disrupt the soil.  But, mostly, I fill the tray (these are houseplants) with the plant in it and let capillary action water it, and then transfer to another tray and tip it up so it can drain, and then put in a dry tray.  I have found that by pouring water over plant, there can be dry spots, and this way, everything gets wet.  Its a hassle, but works for me.  BTW, good luck trying to find a rose that screws off, so, I am really careful not to lose them.  I also use soluble palm food for this method. Cecile.  

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