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palmsOrl

Zone 10 Palms in the Orlando Area Mega Thread

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Eric in Orlando
4 hours ago, palmsOrl said:

I got some seeds that were ripe and had just fallen from a foxtail palm on the west side of Mills Ave just south of where you turn from Leu Gardens.  I have picked up 5 that are germinating now but I could have picked up 100+.

I see a lot of Foxtails around that are flowering or loaded with seed this year. It is still hard to believe I paid $40 for a 1 gal. Wodyetia at the Leu sale in March 1993, they were still rare. And in 2010 I paid $1 for some 1 gal. seedlings at the FIT sale.

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ck_in_fla

I just recalled something that I hadn't thought of in years...

I moved to Orlando in 1966, when I was in High School.  When I was in college, there was a place where young people gathered in Downtown Orlando near Lake Lucerne (actually South of Downtown.  I drove by a large high-rise that was called Lucerne Towers.  It was between 12 and 15 stories and it was shaped like a large "U".  The opening to the "U" faced North and the building was on the South side of Lake Lucerne.  In the courtyard created by the opening of the "U", there were two very large Roystoneas.  I assume they were Roystonea regia, but I'm not certain.  They had been there for many years.  Unfortunately, they were removed when the building was demolished sometime in the 1970's.

The micro-climate created by the design of the building and the location (on the South side of the lake, was perfect for those trees.  As I recall, they had absolutely no damage from any weather events...

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palmsOrl

We really need royals to become a standard palm here in metro Orlando.  Yes, they should be planted where the old fronds don’t pose a hazard when they fall, but that applies anywhere.

Edited by palmsOrl
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kinzyjr

Roystonea regia, Wodyetia bifurcata and Pseudophoenix sargentii are beginning to become standard fare here.  With all of the disease issues, city plantings are either going with marginal plants like those mentioned or with "safe" plantings like Livistona decora.  I'm even seeing more Archontophoenix cunninghamiana than I used to in private gardens.

Can't say I blame them and the newcomers look wonderful, but I miss seeing all of our avenues lined with Phoenix dactylifera and/or Phoenix canariensis.

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Eric in Orlando
3 hours ago, ck_in_fla said:

I just recalled something that I hadn't thought of in years...

I moved to Orlando in 1966, when I was in High School.  When I was in college, there was a place where young people gathered in Downtown Orlando near Lake Lucerne (actually South of Downtown.  I drove by a large high-rise that was called Lucerne Towers.  It was between 12 and 15 stories and it was shaped like a large "U".  The opening to the "U" faced North and the building was on the South side of Lake Lucerne.  In the courtyard created by the opening of the "U", there were two very large Roystoneas.  I assume they were Roystonea regia, but I'm not certain.  They had been there for many years.  Unfortunately, they were removed when the building was demolished sometime in the 1970's.

The micro-climate created by the design of the building and the location (on the South side of the lake, was perfect for those trees.  As I recall, they had absolutely no damage from any weather events...

Are you sure it wasn't Lake Lucerne Towers? It is still there. It is more of an H shape but one of the U shapes faces south. I helped a friend of my moms move in there in summer 1985. There were 2 tall Royals in there then. 1 was dead and the other was alive with some burn. It had survived the 12/83 and 1/85 freezes but died from the 12/89 freeze. In summer 85 there were also queen palms with no damage and tall Scheffleras and crotons so it was a good protected area from the first 2 bad freezes of the 80s. There is a pool in there, it would be a perfect spot for some tall Coconuts. 

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ck_in_fla

After reading your reply, I think you may be remembering this more clearly than I did...  

I agree that would be a perfect spot for a couple of Jamaican Talls.  :-)

Have you seen the small coconut palms planted right at the corner of Orange and Kaley in Downtown Orlando?  With all that concrete, they are likely to do well as long as they receive irrigation and some fertilizer.  I keep meaning to get some pictures of those so the group can see them.

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Eric in Orlando
9 hours ago, ck_in_fla said:

After reading your reply, I think you may be remembering this more clearly than I did...  

I agree that would be a perfect spot for a couple of Jamaican Talls.  :-)

Have you seen the small coconut palms planted right at the corner of Orange and Kaley in Downtown Orlando?  With all that concrete, they are likely to do well as long as they receive irrigation and some fertilizer.  I keep meaning to get some pictures of those so the group can see them.

No I haven't seen those. I don't get down there often but will keep a look out when I do.R ight by the Lucerne Towers at the NW corner of Orange and Lucerne the city planted 3 Beccariophoenix alfredii.

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ck_in_fla
32 minutes ago, Eric in Orlando said:

No I haven't seen those. I don't get down there often but will keep a look out when I do.R ight by the Lucerne Towers at the NW corner of Orange and Lucerne the city planted 3 Beccariophoenix alfredii.

Yes, I see the three Beccariophoenix alfredii every time I take my elderly mother to the doctor.  I was afraid they had over-trimmed them a few months back.  But, I passed by them yesterday and they looked great.

Those Cocos (at Kaley and Orange) should do well if they give them water and fertilizer to get them established.  With all that concrete, temperatures shouldn't be an issue.

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pj_orlando_z9b
On 5/29/2019 at 11:32 PM, ck_in_fla said:

After reading your reply, I think you may be remembering this more clearly than I did...  

I agree that would be a perfect spot for a couple of Jamaican Talls.  :-)

Have you seen the small coconut palms planted right at the corner of Orange and Kaley in Downtown Orlando?  With all that concrete, they are likely to do well as long as they receive irrigation and some fertilizer.  I keep meaning to get some pictures of those so the group can see them.

Didn't get a great pic as I took it through the window but this is them I believe. Nice. I wish they would have planted them further apart.

PSX_20190531_162553.jpg

Edited by pj_orlando_z9b
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palmsOrl

They could use some irrigation and fertilizer to do their best.  Glad to see them planted there.

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ck_in_fla
1 hour ago, pj_orlando_z9b said:

Didn't get a great pic as I took it through the window but this is them I believe. Nice. I wish they would have planted them further apart.

PSX_20190531_162553.jpg

I initially thought the same thing (should have planted them further apart).  But, after thinking about it more, if they do well, they should curve away from each other.  This would create a pleasing visual.

Not sure why one would go through the expense of planting Coconut palms and then not irrigate or fertilize...

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pj_orlando_z9b
34 minutes ago, palmsOrl said:

They could use some irrigation and fertilizer to do their best.  Glad to see them planted there.

Somebody needs to be by twice a year and sprinkle some slow release. lol

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pj_orlando_z9b
14 minutes ago, ck_in_fla said:

I initially thought the same thing (should have planted them further apart).  But, after thinking about it more, if they do well, they should curve away from each other.  This would create a pleasing visual.

Not sure why one would go through the expense of planting Coconut palms and then not irrigate or fertilize...

Not sure they would. everything in my yard including the coconut curves towards the sun. 

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palmsOrl

Exactly Ck, small Cocos will need to have that (at least fertilizer) in Orlando to have a fighting chance at a long term future.  I would be willing to stealth fertilize them sometime, I am already considering doing the same to two foxtail palms on Colonial Dr. They already look malnourished and slightly stunted and they just hurricane cut them.   Ugh.

I might bring each palm like 2 cups of that (not) cheap palm fertilizer you get at the big box stores.

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Eric in Orlando

A nice Dypsis lutescens at a medical office by Loch Haven Park, east shore of Lake Formosa. 

DSC_1878~3.JPG

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Eric in Orlando

A young Cocos off Mills, south of Virginia. 

DSC_1895~2.JPG

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palmsOrl

That Cocos has a little size to it, very nice.

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Eric in Orlando

A couple Hyophorbe lagenicaulis near Mead Gardens in Winter Park. 

DSC_1877~3.JPG

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Eric in Orlando

Mature Wodyetia near Leu Gardens. 

DSC_1893~3.JPG

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palmsOrl

Wodyetia has become pretty standard in Orlando and Winter Park and Adonidia in the downtown Orlando area, not nearly as much in Winter Park.

Edited by palmsOrl
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weldertom
On 5/31/2019 at 7:24 PM, ck_in_fla said:

I initially thought the same thing (should have planted them further apart).  But, after thinking about it more, if they do well, they should curve away from each other.  This would create a pleasing visual.

Not sure why one would go through the expense of planting Coconut palms and then not irrigate or fertilize...

They will look great until the power company sends in Asplundh to top them. :violin:

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palmsOrl

Unfortunately yes regarding the small Cocos under the power lines.  Are these municipal plantings?  If they are a private planting, they should really be relocated now before they get established and more difficult to move.  If I had the space, I would bring car-loads of coconuts back when I made trips to South Florida, grow them to 5 feet or so in cheap black plastic pots and stealth plant them around town in late spring when the rainy season is about to start.  A few hundred a year maybe.

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ck_in_fla
1 hour ago, palmsOrl said:

Unfortunately yes regarding the small Cocos under the power lines.  Are these municipal plantings?  If they are a private planting, they should really be relocated now before they get established and more difficult to move.  If I had the space, I would bring car-loads of coconuts back when I made trips to South Florida, grow them to 5 feet or so in cheap black plastic pots and stealth plant them around town in late spring when the rainy season is about to start.  A few hundred a year maybe.

Kind of like the "Johnny Appleseed" of Coconut palms.  :-)

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Eric in Orlando

Down the street from me in Altamonte Springs. 

DSC_1909~3.JPG

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palmsOrl

Eric, that is a really nice Cocos.  Do you know the owners?

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Eric in Orlando
5 hours ago, palmsOrl said:

Eric, that is a really nice Cocos.  Do you know the owners?

No, I have never talked to them. The palms were planted around 2011 or 12.

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Eric in Orlando

A triple trunk specimen of Veitchia arecina growing at Leu Gardens. It was planted in 2008 from a 5 gallon specimen I found at a local box store. The tallest trunk is now over 30ft tall.

veitarc.jpg

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Reeverse
1 hour ago, Eric in Orlando said:

A triple trunk specimen of Veitchia arecina growing at Leu Gardens. It was planted in 2008 from a 5 gallon specimen I found at a local box store. The tallest trunk is now over 30ft tall.

veitarc.jpg

Seems like they are a little more cold hardy than the Adonidia? I have some that recovered well after 28degrees a couple years ago. 

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Eric in Orlando

Definitely hardier than Adonidia but slightly less than Roystonea or Wodyetia. We have another over 30ft specimen at Leu that was planted around 1998. It flowers but never sets seed. These all did well after the 2009-10 winter with minor/moderate foliage burn. They would do well in the warmer areas under tree canopy or amongst taller buildings, especially downtown.

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pj_orlando_z9b

Taking photos on rainy days are the best. My backyard coconut always explodes with the heat/humidity/rains. I've had over 3" the last few days. Time to replenish the ground. 

20190609_163808.jpg

20190609_163746.jpg

Edited by pj_orlando_z9b
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Eric in Orlando

Coconuts near Leu Gardens in the Beeman Park neighborhood. 

DSC_1936~2.JPG

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Eric in Orlando

Another house back in Beeman Park with Adonidia, Hyophorbe verschaffeltii,  and Ravenala madagascariensis. 

DSC_1937~2.JPG

DSC_1938~2.JPG

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Eric in Orlando

A zone 10 tree at a neighbors house 2 doors down, Terminalia catappa. These are a borderline 10b tree. This froze to the ground in 2009-10 and came back. It had gotten to about 20ft but was knocked back to about 5ft after the Jan 2018 freeze. 

DSC_1939~4.JPG

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Eric in Orlando

Winter Park Hospital just built a new wellness building. Some very tall Wodyetia were planted and Dypsis decaryi 

DSC_1928~2.JPG

DSC_1927~2.JPG

DSC_1926~2.JPG

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Eric in Orlando

Also Cycas rumphii and though not a zone 10 palm, some nice Livistona nitida. 

DSC_1930~2.JPG

DSC_1931~2.JPG

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Eric in Orlando

Satakentia liukiuensis growing in the lower Tropical Stream Garden at Leu Gardens.

satak1.jpg

satak2.jpg

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RyManUtah
On 6/4/2019 at 11:06 AM, palmsOrl said:

Unfortunately yes regarding the small Cocos under the power lines.  Are these municipal plantings?  If they are a private planting, they should really be relocated now before they get established and more difficult to move.  If I had the space, I would bring car-loads of coconuts back when I made trips to South Florida, grow them to 5 feet or so in cheap black plastic pots and stealth plant them around town in late spring when the rainy season is about to start.  A few hundred a year maybe.

This makes me happy. Avid stealth planter myself :) 

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pj_orlando_z9b

First ever coconut inflorescence!

20190622_065843-977x1221.jpg

20190622_065857-974x1732.jpg

20190622_065909-980x1566.jpg

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Reeverse

We all have been watching your palm for awhile. That's awesome. Looks great

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Walt
4 hours ago, pj_orlando_z9b said:

First ever coconut inflorescence!

20190622_065843-977x1221.jpg

20190622_065857-974x1732.jpg

20190622_065909-980x1566.jpg

Congratulations.  I know it's a thrill to see the first inflorescence.  I remember the first inflorescence my coconut made, and some small nuts followed, the all aborted.

 So far this year two inflorescence have opened on my coconut palm -- and the pesky squirrels ate the flowers! I have two more unopened spathe. I'm just hoping the squirrels stop eating the flowers, or else I won't have any more coconut fruits.

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