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JLeVert

Sabal minor on the Georgia/South Carolina Line

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JLeVert

On Sunday, I was out running the off-road bike trails in the Sumter National Forest in Edgefield County, SC about twenty minutes from Augusta, Ga, and ran up on this beautiful colony of Sabal minor.  Minors are actually pretty common in inundation and seepage areas in the forest, but can be found on steep slopes well away from obvious water sources.  This colony was at 285' in elevation or a little less since I was up above them to take the picture.  On some of the other trails, the colonies are even more extensive.

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PalmatierMeg

Beautiful habitat photos. Might be fun exploring close before weed & bug season gets here. You might find a undiscovered variety.

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PalmTreeDude

Nice pictures and great find! It's interesting how Sabal minor seem to cling to the moist areas of the forest. Yet, like you said, they also can grow in drier areas. One of the most interesting areas I have seen Sabal minor growing wild was in a pine savanna also in South Carolina. There was no water sources that I could see and it seemed pretty dry, yet there were scattered Sabal minor. 

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Mightycanes

Wow, that is amazing

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Laaz

Great pics Joe. Down here in the lowcountry there are thousands of pockets of minors. You can drive around & you'll find a colony with small minors, nothing for a mile or two & then another colony with totally different looking minors. Some colonies have thousands & some are lucky to have 50.

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JLeVert

Right Laaz.  Same here in Georgia.  Right across the river from Augusta is Gum Swamp.  The minors are in the thousands!  Sometimes I think that they are missing in certain areas because agricultural interests used the land and wiped out the minor and lots of other stuff as well.

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Palmensammler

Wonderful pictures of Sabal minor. Would be nice to grow Sabal minor in the forests here in Germany too but I think summer heat and sun are missing.

Started to built up my own S. minor collection (actually only three different ones) as this could be a palm I can grow outside besides the Trachies. 
I'm always checking the Inet for new seeds.

Eckhard

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NC_Palms
6 hours ago, JLeVert said:

Right Laaz.  Same here in Georgia.  Right across the river from Augusta is Gum Swamp.  The minors are in the thousands!  Sometimes I think that they are missing in certain areas because agricultural interests used the land and wiped out the minor and lots of other stuff as well.

Same here in NC. In some counties, Sabal minor is listed as an invasive weed while in others counties Sabal minor has been displaced from habitat disruption. 

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