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bgl

Jubaea heaven - Parque Nacional La Campana near Valparaiso, Chile

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bgl

With good friends Carlos and Gaby I had the good fortune to visit and hike around Parque Nacional La Campana earlier today. Thousands of Jubaea chilensis in habitat - an absolutely unforgettable experience! Here are a few of the many photos I took. :) Parque Nacional La Campana is a bit inland from Valparaiso and not far from Santiago.

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Yunder Wækraus

Spectacular!

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awkonradi

Thank you for sharing!

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Exotic Life

Crazy views!

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Josue Diaz

Wow! Spectacular. Thank you for sharing.

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Tyrone

They grow even on the ridge tops. Very few palms would do that in a dry climate in nature. These things are no doubt drought tolerant. Almost like a cycad.

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kinzyjr

Thank you.  One of my favorite palms, but only get to see it other places unfortunately.

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palmfriend

Bo-Göran,

 

Thank you very much for letting us take part! A truly spectacular palm photographed in its habitat - great photos!

Best regards -

Lars

 

 

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bgl

Thanks for all your comments! And yes, it was pretty surprising and amazing to see all those tall Jubaeas up on top that very dry mountaintop. Drought tolerant indeed! Here's a few more photos. :)

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Kim

Were there any seedlings or juveniles? Amazing sight! Most appear to be quite mature, from what I can make out in the photos.

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bgl

Ahhh, seedlings, thank you for asking! :mrlooney:  I should have addressed that issue in my earlier posts. Unfortunately, and I looked very hard and all over the place, I did not see a single seedling. I did see smaller individuals but the smallest ones were about 6-7 ft tall. I was told by a park ranger that there are rodents and apparently they find the fruit & seed quite tasty. Unfortunately! :o

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DoomsDave

@bgl, i second @Kim's query.

Maybe some spectacular pics of some babies to coo over?

OOPs, guess not. Sorry to hear.

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DoomsDave

@bgl, any signs of fungus or other problems? Maybe babies succumb to that, too, like they sometimes do here in California. (Like bigger plants sometimes do.)

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bgl
54 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

@bgl, any signs of fungus or other problems? Maybe babies succumb to that, too, like they sometimes do here in California. (Like bigger plants sometimes do.)

Didn't observe any signs of that and I find it extremely farfetched that close to 100% of all seedlings over a very large area would succumb to something like that. This is unfortunately a fairly common scenario - some type of animal will eat the seed/fruit/small seedlings of a native palm (or any plant for that matter). We have pigs in Hawaii making it impossible for the native Pritchardia to regenerate in a natural way and I observed the same thing a year ago when I travelled with Gaston and Elena to a Butia habitat in Uruguay with tens of thousands of mature individuals but not a single seedling in sight. Free roaming cattle is the problem there.

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DoomsDave
3 hours ago, bgl said:

Didn't observe any signs of that and I find it extremely farfetched that close to 100% of all seedlings over a very large area would succumb to something like that. This is unfortunately a fairly common scenario - some type of animal will eat the seed/fruit/small seedlings of a native palm (or any plant for that matter). We have pigs in Hawaii making it impossible for the native Pritchardia to regenerate in a natural way and I observed the same thing a year ago when I travelled with Gaston and Elena to a Butia habitat in Uruguay with tens of thousands of mature individuals but not a single seedling in sight. Free roaming cattle is the problem there.

Yeah must agree about that far fetched part

dang so sad to hear

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realarch

Fantastic thread Bo, thanks for taking thr time to post. That hiking path through the Jubea forest must have been quite the experience. 

You don't often get to walk through a grove of giants.

Tim

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Tyrone
17 hours ago, bgl said:

Ahhh, seedlings, thank you for asking! :mrlooney:  I should have addressed that issue in my earlier posts. Unfortunately, and I looked very hard and all over the place, I did not see a single seedling. I did see smaller individuals but the smallest ones were about 6-7 ft tall. I was told by a park ranger that there are rodents and apparently they find the fruit & seed quite tasty. Unfortunately! :o

A 6 or 7 ft tall individual is already about 15-20 years old from seed roughly so the rat problem has got worse in the last 15-20 years then at a guess.

That's also why all my Jubaea seedlings remain behind vermin proof wire until they've used the seed up. Rats will just run away with the seed and leave the seedling starving for food.

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Alicante

Amazing pics!

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Alberto

Amazing place. Visited it 2 years ago

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