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Licuala Peltata indoors in New York help needed

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Strangeinternet

Hey all,

I got my first Peltata two weeks ago from a Florida nursery..about 36" tall and 4 fans/spears. I'm in New York City and trying to figure out to the best indoor care strategy especially re: light.

I'm not letting the soil dry out and misting 2x a day which seems straightforward but as for light I've seen a lot of conflicting notes. It's an understory palm that needs shade outdoors but it seemed dangerous to treat it like a low-light indoors plant. Looking for some experienced advice on lighting. Right now, I have it about 3" ft from a southern facing window that gets about 5 hours of full sun this time of year but I can raise or lower a solar shade on. Is it going to burn in full sun? Any tips would be much appreciated,

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ParkerK

Hey there @Strangeinternet!

Is it a Licuala peltata var. 'sumawongii' or L. peltata var. peltata (entire or split leaf?)

If it's a sumawongii, sounds like you're doing everything right. From what I've heard and from my own little experience, these palms seem to tolerate an array of environmental conditions.

I live in Socal and I've got mine in a one gallon pot, receives a few hours of morning sun and is doing well. I even leave it out through colder nights into the high 30s (yeah, us California's are wusses and think the 30s are cold, but the palms do too! lol).

Cool to see you growing this indoors in NY! Lets see some pictures and let us know how it goes!

20190201_071111.jpg

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Strangeinternet

Awesome-- thanks for the feedback. It is indeed sumawongii. I figured I'd see leaf burn if it didn't like the sun but the leaves are so pristine right now that I didn't want to experiment too much. I caught some spider mites on it a few days ago that I think I took care of but besides that, seems to be happy. There was a new, fully-closed spear in there when I got it and it's slowly opening up, so I figured monitoring the progress and color on that is another way to gauge things. I'm a novice with palms, but these are one of the most beautiful ones out there in my opinion. Here are two pics from just after I got it..can't take much credit except for finding a nursery that would ship to me!

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Fusca

Looks great!  Hope you can keep it looking this way!

Jon

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piping plovers

Strangeinternet:  That is a beautiful Sumawongii!  I also have been growing my potted Sumawongii in a south window during the cold months and it seems very happy.  When the exposure begins to get hotter in March or so, I will draw a sheer curtain if light seems to be too strong.  Outdoors, I keep it in dappled sunlight to shade.  Being in a small pot in well draining mix, it drinks alot of water.  I give it the lift test, if it seems too light in weight relative to just watered weight---- it gets watered.  You'll be able to gauge it after awhile.  I dilute liquid fertilizer and apply it every other watering.  I am surprised that it pushes growth even in the dark, short days time of winter; but south window gives it the most natural light we northern States can offer.  Some pics below:  when 1st purchased in 2017 and then current pic in 2019.  I may repot it this spring.  Other pic is the sunny south window with Sumawongii and its friend Joey passing the winter months.

 

1272557329_Sumawongiijune2017.thumb.jpg.ab553bc565a1b369611ea626081a6682.jpg1833065259_Sumawongiijan2019.thumb.jpg.54363ca614b2003f0682473f70e925fa.jpg1460877810_winter2019palms.thumb.jpg.04b5c4eac838e77db9123de8244292df.jpg

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Missi

Oh how stunning is your specimen!! My sumawongii can take all day filtered (by lanai screen) Florida sun, so I'm thinking yours will love that window location. Just check the leaves daily to ensure they're not getting much lighter in color.

 

EDIT: WELCOME TO PALMTALK!! :yay:

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Strangeinternet

Thanks everyone! Week later: the spear that was probably starting to come out when it was still at the nursery in florida seems to have stalled, but what can I expect? Otherwise seems to be doing just fine. Wondering if it's worth fertilizing or waiting until spring...what exactly are the downsides to year-round fertilizing a slow growing palm like this?

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zoli

I would not fertilize in the winter at all and even during the growing season I would only apply fertilizer once or maybe twice and sparingly at that. It all too easy to over-fertilize and end up with a crummy looking plant. Your palm should have ample nutrients in the soil if properly mixed. 

Your palm probably stalled because it's dealing with the shock of having moved from a comfy Florida greenhouse to an indoor location in a large city. However, if properly cared for, it should recover in about a month and resume growth. 

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