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Eric in Orlando

pastel colored hybrid Trumpet Tree/Handroanthus (Tabebuia)

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Eric in Orlando

This hybrid Trumpet Tree is growing next to the Rose Garden at Leu Gardens. It is a cross of the pink Handroanthus impetiginous and the gold H. chrysotrichus. Both were formerly Tabebuia species. It was planted in Nov. 2003, about 2-3ft tall. It has displayed hybrid vigor as it grew very fast and robust. It has a more narrow habit like H. chrysotrichus but has grown taller than they usually do. The foliage looks more like H. impetiginosus and it has the bristly hairs of H. chrysotrichus but not as dense. The flowers emerge a pale pastel yellow with some pink. They turn more yellow after a couple days then to pale pink before dropping. It will flower twice. Once in January and again in March. It rarely sets seed and they must be sterile as I have never gotten any to germinate.

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Eric in Orlando

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Silas_Sancona
21 minutes ago, Eric in Orlando said:

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Great looking tree, thanks for sharing Eric.

Assuming, since it's apparently sterile ...or what seed is produced is of low potential viability,  grafting would be the only means of propagation?  Thought someone had mentioned germinating seed off the L.A. Arboretum's specimen of this cross here on the forum in the past..

Curious how the White Flowered forms of T. impetiginosa  you'd discussed several years ago are doing, assuming they're still in Leu's collection.. 

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Eric in Orlando

Bernie Peterson at Rockledge Gardens made this cross. He did lots of hybridizing with H. chrysotrichus, impetiginosus and umbellatus. The seeds would never come true to the parentve to graft for a reliable color. We have several of these tri species hybrids and they range from almost white to pinks, purples and pastel yellows.

The 'Naples White' is doing well. It suffered damage 2 years ago from a falling tree in Hurricane Matthew so it has funky shaped canopy. It did flower last year. Someone gave us seed from another specimen. Not sure if the seedlings will be reliably white.

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Matthew92

Beautiful! Dr. Bowden was telling our class about that tree a couple weeks ago. Hope it's still blooming this Monday when I come back.

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Really full garden

Just spectacular! I wish I could get viable seeds.

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Brad Mondel

Gorgeous.

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Peter

Great tree Eric.  Do you have any photos of the cross that is almost white?  And I have started to grow out a few seedlings from my white
'alba' from Gardino's.  Ken Greby helped me pick out the seedling with pale yellow petioles-hopefully it will be white or something pale.  It's in the ground but a slow grower so don't think it will flower this year as it's still only 2' tall but will keep you posted. 

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jimmyt

Ooohh that's nice...………. :)

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Eric in Orlando
On 1/25/2019 at 11:44 AM, Peter said:

Great tree Eric.  Do you have any photos of the cross that is almost white?  And I have started to grow out a few seedlings from my white
'alba' from Gardino's.  Ken Greby helped me pick out the seedling with pale yellow petioles-hopefully it will be white or something pale.  It's in the ground but a slow grower so don't think it will flower this year as it's still only 2' tall but will keep you posted. 

We have 3 white flowering specimens. One is Handranthus imetiginosus 'Naples White'. Another was donated as H. impetiginosus 'Alba'. It flowered when we first planted it in 2009. Since then, nothing. The 3rd is a white flowering hybrid of H. chrysotrichus, impetiginosus and umbellatus .

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Eric in Orlando

Here is Handroanthus impetiginosus 'Naples White' from last year.

 

 

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Eric in Orlando

Here is the mostly white hybrid from last year, it has some pink blush and a yellow throat

 

 

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Matthew92

I did see it yesterday- although the flowers were sort of fading. That definitely is one of the most robust and healthy Handroanthus I've seen. Many I've noticed in the area seem to suffer from some kind of deficiency or don't seem as vigorous.

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Peter

Very nice Eric-thanks!

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Hillizard

My Handroanthus (Tabebuia) heptaphyllus (via Gardino Nursery) is in full flower right now. It's not a large tree yet, but has been blooming dependably for several years already. https://selectree.calpoly.edu/tree-detail/handroanthus-heptaphyllus

That's a silver-blue Butia odorata (formerly capitata) behind it. Also my H. umbellatus has developing flower buds for the first time, so that's something to anticipate. 

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Peter

Good colour

 

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Hillizard

My spindly Handroanthus umbellatus shot up to over 6 feet the last couple of years and is now blooming for the first time on its skinny branches. At least to me these blooms resemble those of every other yellow-flowered species in this genus. The important thing is that this species is dependably cold-hardy where I live. I'm hoping it becomes a more robust-looking tree over time. That's a Brachychiton acerifolius just starting to leaf-out in the background in the second image. And in the third image you can see a Clytostoma callistegioides (L) and a Millettia reticulata (R) vine on the trellis behind it. 

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