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UK_Palms

Exotic gardening at 51N

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UK_Palms

Okay, so I have been a palm enthusiast and exotic gardener for about 4 years now. Most of my palms are still quite young/small, as I am only 26 years old, therefore it's not like I have been growing palms for 20 years or anything. I have only been doing it for a few years. 

At 51N, in the southeast of England, the climate can be a bit of a challenge for me. Summers are generally pretty warm here, but winters can get cold as I am inland, away from the coast. Growing my favourite palm types, such as Phoenix & Washingtonia, can be a bit of a challenge here. Fortunately this winter has been pretty mild for us. Last night the low was 10C (50F) and today we reached a high of 55F (13C). Considering we are in the middle of winter, at lat 51N, that is pretty good weather. We haven't actually had a frost yet, in 2019. But on average, I can generally expect a frost on 1 in 8 winter nights, and I average around 30 frosts a year in total.

The reason for a lot of my palms being containerised is that I am planning to move house in the not too distant future, and I want to be able to take most of them with me. I don't want to go to the effort of planting them in the ground, then having to dig them back up again. Or having to leave them behind altogether. Hence all the pots. I'm sure people will understand. 

All the photos below were taken on 13/01/2019...

Sabal Palmetto

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Trachycarpus Princeps Hybrid

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Phoenix Theophrasti

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Trachycarpus Fortunei

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Trachycarpus Wagnerianus

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Cordyline 'Starburst'

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Cordyline 'Pink Passion'

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Left Border

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Right border

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Another Fortunei - some don't handle the wind well at all, and have less robust fronds...

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Trachycarpus Nova

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Trachycarpus Takaggi & Chamaerops Vulcano

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Chamaerops Humilis

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Washingtonia Robusta

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Cordyline 'Red Star'

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Cordyline Australis, Butia Eriospatha & Jubaea Chilensis

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Jubaea Chilensis

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Butia Odorata

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Phoenix Canariensis - grown from seed and very hardy. It doesn't show any damage at -5C and has survived -8C in a pot, with minimal frond burn. 

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Washingtonia Filibusta & Filifera seedlings (6-9 months old)

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Washingtonia Robusta seedlings (2 months old)

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Assorted Cacti planter - this stays outdoors all winter, but is protected from rain and excess moisture by overhead shelter, as they MUST be kept dry in winter. 

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Opuntia Microdaysis (bunny ears cactus) - also remains outdoors year round and can take -5C no problem. 

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Citrus Calamondin I bring my citrus indoors if an overnight frost is forecast, to keep it actively growing and fruiting. It hasn't come indoors yet in 2019, and is now flowering again due to the mild, spring like temperatures.

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Serrano Pepper - I also bring the peppers indoors on nights that frost is forecast, to keep them producing. This one has actually taken a few light frosts, to no ill effect. 

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Lovely sunset tonight...

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RichAZ

Very nice collection of palms.  Looking good!

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RJ

Great collection, is that how Sabal's grow that far north? It just looks different then what I'm used to. but know palms can look different in different climates. How's the growth rate on the T. Nova? Been thinking of adding that one you my collection. 

 

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Ben in Norcal

The first picture is not a Sabal.  Chamaerops? 

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PalmatierMeg

Beautiful selection of cold hardy palms! I agree with Ben: 1st selection is not a Sabal.

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UK_Palms
4 minutes ago, RJ said:

Great collection, is that how Sabal's grow that far north? It just looks different then what I'm used to. but know palms can look different in different climates. How's the growth rate on the T. Nova? Been thinking of adding that one you my collection. 

 

If you didn't think it was a Sabal, what would you personally say it is? Chamaerops Humilis? 

I rescued this from a garage sale about 5 years ago. It was going very cheap and had no label, and it was my first palm. As it has aged, I couldn't be sure whether it was a Chamaerops or Sabal? I used to think it was Chamaerops, but then changed my opinion to Sabal. Any ideas? 

The Nova is pretty quick growing and trunks very quickly. Only the Washingtonia's are faster growing than the Nova in my yard. 

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UK_Palms
2 hours ago, Ben in Norcal said:

The first picture is not a Sabal.  Chamaerops? 

Yeah, I'm thinking it may be a Chamaerops, as that is what I initially thought it was a few years back after I brought it from a garage sale. But I have quite a few Chamaerops now and this particular palm grows 3-4 x as fast as my next fastest growing Chamaerops and looks quite different. So it has confused me for a while. 

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Cikas
On 1/14/2019 at 8:11 AM, UK_Palms said:

Yeah, I'm thinking it may be a Chamaerops, as that is what I initially thought it was a few years back after I brought it from a garage sale. But I have quite a few Chamaerops now and this particular palm grows 3-4 x as fast as my next fastest growing Chamaerops and looks quite different. So it has confused me for a while. 

That palm is Chamaerops. It is definitely not Sabal.

Chamaerops is very variable palm species, with many different forms.

 

 

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DoomsDave

@UK_Palms! Nice garden you have there!

See my PM for some free seeds . . . .

That first palm is a Chamaerops for sure: (a) petioles are spiny while Sabals are not; (b) blossoms are close to the trunk. Sabals are on long stems.

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PalmTreeDude

This is what Sabal palmettos looks like. What you have in your first picture is some form of Chamaerops (it looks really cool though). 

20180823_174030.jpg

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UK_Palms

Just got a question regarding my 9 month old Washingtonia Filibusta seedlings... 

So a few of them are growing with a slight curve in them. Like the trunk is almost shaped like a banana where it has curved at the bottom and top. It doesn't look too bad in the pictures I have attached, but up close in person, the curve does look quite obvious and somewhat unappealing. I'm just wondering what the general consensus is on why this is happening?

It's only happening to 2 or 3 specimens, out of a batch of 8. So not all are affected by this. I have heard that this curve is potentially due to them sitting in wet soil, with wet roots. I find that hard to believe though, since some of my other Filibusta seedlings have been sitting in even wetter soil than these two, yet those particular ones are growing straight still, with no curves.

I also wonder if it could be down to the lack of sunlight at this time of year. As the sun has dropped so low, behind the trees and houses, my back yard is now only getting 1-2 hours of direct sunlight each day right now. Come June, the same spot will get 12 hours direct though as the sun will be high up in the sky. So it's only a temporary problem. It's also worth mentioning that I have brought them indoors a few times during real cold snaps, so they have spent some on the windowsill with filtered light. I wonder if this has led to them growing at an angle?

Or maybe some specimens just grow like that regardless, when young? I don't know though, which is why I am asking. Hopefully someone knows why and can offer some advice on this issue. Also, does anyone know if the palms in question will grow out of this in the future, and straighten themselves? Or will they always retain a curve in them now?

Cheers 

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