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PalmTreeDude

It Is Icy Out!

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PalmTreeDude

So we had a bit of snow, then it got really icy and apparently we are suppose to have more snow around 5 PM. Tempature has been hovering from 30 - 34 degrees F. Tonight it is suppose to get down to 27 degrees F. I am sure the roads are going to be a mess. 

Loblolly Pines (below)

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Edited by PalmTreeDude
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PalmTreeDude

Needle Palm (below)

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Butia (below) 

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PalmTreeDude

One of my many Sabal palmetto seedlings (below)

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GottmitAlex

That's cold alright!

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