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redbeard917

What's wrong with my Sabal etonia?

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redbeard917

This Sabal etonia has grown here slowly but steadily for years. It's always been completely green. In fact, I'm not sure I've ever watered or fertilized it. I'm not far from the native range and have placed it in a location with sandy soil and a good bit of sunlight.

Very recently, perhaps a month or so ago, I noticed it starting to decline. The newest leaf looks green, but the most recent look mottled and the oldest have gone completely brown. All the leaves you see on it were green previously. It almost looks like cold damage, but it hasn't been very cold here. I have other tender palms that get damaged every year and all are still untouched.

Thanks

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redbeard917

IMG_20190111_123909.jpg

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redbeard917

IMG_20190111_131923.jpg

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Josue Diaz

Ouch, whatever it is, it looks like it may be dead already. 

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Reeverse

Ouch. Looks dead. Herbicide or cold?

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Josue Diaz

I had a sabal maritiformis die when I repotted it (the spear pulled), but the existing fronds remained green and it looked alive for just over a year. I held on to it hoping it would pull through. There wasn't ever any new growth from the center though, and eventually the leaves all collapsed and I knew then it was gone. Maybe yours has been dead for a long time and just now ran out of energy to keep the leaves green? 

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NC_Palms

How cold has it got in Woodville? Isn't that near Tallahassee? I doubt it got anywhere cold enough to damage a Sabal etonia.

 

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Phoenikakias
On 11/1/2019, 7:40:02, redbeard917 said:

This Sabal etonia has grown here slowly but steadily for years. It's always been completely green. In fact, I'm not sure I've ever watered or fertilized it. I'm not far from the native range and have placed it in a location with sandy soil and a good bit of sunlight.

Very recently, perhaps a month or so ago, I noticed it starting to decline. The newest leaf looks green, but the most recent look mottled and the oldest have gone completely brown. All the leaves you see on it were green previously. It almost looks like cold damage, but it hasn't been very cold here. I have other tender palms that get damaged every year and all are still untouched.

Thanks

It is SSD, welcome to the club, I have lost during recent years quite  few Sabal palms this way. I am sure that if you give central part a persistent tag, it will pull.

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PalmTreeDude

Sorry to see this happen to your etonia. :crying:

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redbeard917

Yes, I'm near Tallahassee. It's been very warm this winter. I'm not sure it will ever get cold enough to damage a Sabal etonia here, but this year, even my most tender palms are untouched.

What is SSD?

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cm05

I wouldn’t rule out some sort of root issue, especially since it appears to have declined out of nowhere. Has it been very wet there?

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redbeard917

Yes, it's been the rainiest December in recorded history.

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Bigfish

Have you tugged on it to see if roots are still there?  Looks like vole damage to me.

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Allen

In FL looking that is sure to be bad news.  Hope it has a chance to recover.

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buffy

Appears to be suffering from a mild case of death.

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Laaz

I would have to say, some type of root damage. Rodent or insect most likely.

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Fusca
On 1/17/2019 at 7:48 PM, redbeard917 said:

What is SSD?

Secret Sabal Disease?  :)

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Henoh
11 hours ago, Laaz said:

I would have to say, some type of root damage. Rodent or insect most likely.

I agree. Moles killed my young Sabal x brazoriensis.

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RJ
46 minutes ago, Henoh said:

I agree. Moles killed my young Sabal x brazoriensis.

Moles? Moles don't eat roots and such. Moles tend to eat grubs and earth worms. 

Voles, however, are herbivorous and will eat roots and tubers. I don't know if you distinguish between the two on the other side of the pond or not. ;)

 

 

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Laaz

Moles will rip the roots a part as they dig & will make a nest in the rootball & tear it apart.

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Phoenikakias
On 1/18/2019 at 3:48 AM, redbeard917 said:

Yes, I'm near Tallahassee. It's been very warm this winter. I'm not sure it will ever get cold enough to damage a Sabal etonia here, but this year, even my most tender palms are untouched.

What is SSD?

Sudden Sabal Death. I have posted a whole topic on this issue.

 

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Phoenikakias
On 1/31/2019 at 4:47 PM, Phoenikakias said:

Sudden Sabal Death. I have posted a whole topic on this issue.

 

Sabal mexicana in the ground with drip irrigation suffering from Sudden Sabal Death. No spear pull yet but omens are not bad.

20190201_124156.jpg

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Phoenikakias

A close up of the central part. Newest, fully developed leaf is already dead and removed and spear is also dry but a small basal part.

20190201_124208.jpg

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Phoenikakias

Another potted Sabal mexicana from same seed batch growing in a medium consisting of native soil mixed with peaty substrate at equal rates. Has not diseased yet, but I used to let soil dry out substantially before next watering.

20190201_124235.jpg

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Phoenikakias

And a close up of the central part, still healthy.

20190201_124243.thumb.jpg.ef47b61a43e2e1ebda1d380bee562a3a.jpg

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Phoenikakias

Sabal minor, complete central part (spear and newest rosette of fully developed leaves) dead, but no spear pull yet.

20190201_124315.thumb.jpg.89ed778de24ca9d0124c5794d4dd2093.jpg

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Phoenikakias

And a close up of the former central part. No spear pull, but also no new growth for almost two years except a weed. Plant is imo dead.

20190201_124321.thumb.jpg.5f78b0a467a16ea06a982b3cf50990e3.jpg

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Laaz

Phoenikakias that is strange. I have never seen that before. Here sabals are native & you never see this. A virus or disease in your area maybe?

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Phoenikakias
1 hour ago, Laaz said:

Phoenikakias that is strange. I have never seen that before. Here sabals are native & you never see this. A virus or disease in your area maybe?

There have been several more Sabal casualties in my garden, like domingensis, bermudana, palmetto, an older mexicana, brazoria  and  uresana. Always the pattern of their decline has been the same; a dramatic deterioration of plant's central part ending in spear pull within two to three weeks, no matter my effort to save them. I suspect that whatever factor kills regularly my Sabal plants here, has made an exceptional entrance also in your place. I mean redbeard917's place...

Edited by Phoenikakias
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