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Tracy

Haemanthus sanguineus -anyone growing this bulb?

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Tracy

I found this plant growing at the San Diego Botanical Gardens and was fascinated by the large leathery leaves.  When I looked up the species name the leaves didn't seem to match although I think it is the correct genus.  Anyone growing these bulbs or another species within the Haemanthus genus?  If so please share photos and your experience.  I'm interested in trying this plant, but the next task will be finding out where to get them.

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Missi

No, but it's weird and, being that I love to grow weird things, I think I NEED to grow it now. :lol: Have you looked up photos of the flower?:yay:

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Silas_Sancona

Tracy, i think they might have the species labeled wrong.. Look up pictures of H. coccineus compared to sanguineus..( African Plants, a Photo Guide ) Quite distinct foliage between the two.

As for growing, been on a multi-year quest myself to find these for sale. Thought there was a nursery in your area ..maybe Oceanside? that specialized in South African Bulbs. Maybe he closed??  Might also contact Huntington, think they've offered starts off a couple sp. there in the past.  / SilverHill Seeds in South Africa. 

Supposedly, from what i have read.. Winter-growing sp. ( approx 15 sp.) can take some sun, while evergreen and summer growing sp.( 2 and 6 sp., approx.) want more partial shade. Also, once in the ground, don't disturb them if you want flowers (like Amaryllis belladonna, Scadoxus, and Clivia Lilies)

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Tracy
5 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

i think they might have the species labeled wrong.. Look up pictures of H. coccineus compared to sanguineus..( African Plants, a Photo Guide ) Quite distinct foliage between the two.

Yes, I had looked up after I got home, but ran with the name on their label just because it was so prominent in the only photo I took of it.  This grouping of bulbs was in a mid-afternoon sunny spot but I don't recall what else was around it as far as how much sun it would get in the am's and later afternoons.  This is something I like for the foliage, so flowers during the off season would just be a bonus!  From what I could tell there are several subspecies of Haemanthus coccineus.

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Silas_Sancona
24 minutes ago, Tracy said:

Yes, I had looked up after I got home, but ran with the name on their label just because it was so prominent in the only photo I took of it.  This grouping of bulbs was in a mid-afternoon sunny spot but I don't recall what else was around it as far as how much sun it would get in the am's and later afternoons.  This is something I like for the foliage, so flowers during the off season would just be a bonus!  From what I could tell there are several subspecies of Haemanthus coccineus.

I hear ya,  same thing  has happened to me when jotting down names on labels at Desert Botanical, or the ASDM only to see that something might have got miss labeled when doing further research later.. Agree, really like the look of the foliage also.. Remember first seeing pictures of the species from the Huntington.. Think the L.A. Arboretum has these in their collection as well.. or did?  Will have to look into that more, anyhow.. 

Think H. coccineus has different forms, and / or ..possibly some cultivated forms? as well..  H canaliculatus, H. crispus, and H. pubescens look pretty cool also, if they can be tracked down.. Flowers remind me of Torch Gingers (Etlingera sp.) Wonder how they'd hold up when put in a Vase.

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Marius

I grow a couple of haemanthus albiflos. They are in a shady spot under an African Wild Olive tree alongside some clivias. They get morning sun. Mine don’t go completely dormant in winter although it starts to look tatty and torn. It flowers and produces new leaves in Autumn and then later the red fleshy seeds. The picture is what it looks like now in mid summer. 

They occur wild in the Eastern coastal belt of South Africa, but do quite well for me in Bloemfontein in the arid interior. 

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Marius

Here is a pic of last year’s flowers 

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greysrigging

The Ox Tongue Lily ( Haemanthus Coccineus is a South African bulb from the Mediterranean climate zone. My mother grows them near Sydney, NSW and while not an ideal climate with its summer bias rainfall, the seem to do OK. The parent bulbs are 100 years old, having been grown by my great grandmother and passed on down through the family generations. I have tried to grow them in Darwin but my climate is a Zone ( or 3 ) too far from their natural habitat.. In southern parts of Australia they flower in March before the two large strap leaves ( up to 4' long ) appear.

http://www.strangewonderfulthings.com/254.htm?fbclid=IwAR3Sy1CU_994MSSuwBrnCD_M7wN5jvxahfl9Sx-XIbB1Ue4f-wsdRqAeXQI

The related plant ( Scadoxus Multiflorus ) or common name  Blood Lily is a great bulb for tropical and sub tropical regions. Fairly common in Darwin gardens.

 

 

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greysrigging

Ox Tongue Lily ( my father's slides 1965 )

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Morabeza

I agree, the sanguineus ID is incorrect. I grow almost every species in the genus and these are undoubtedly H. coccineus, a variable species inhabiting a huge range of climates in South Africa from Port Elizabeth to Namaqualand (most species have a more restricted range).

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greysrigging
11 hours ago, Morabeza said:

I agree, the sanguineus ID is incorrect. I grow almost every species in the genus and these are undoubtedly H. coccineus, a variable species inhabiting a huge range of climates in South Africa from Port Elizabeth to Namaqualand (most species have a more restricted range).

Interesting.... you manage to grow H coccineus in your climate ?  Does the modest altitude help ? I would love to try them in my tropical lowland climate, my one previous attempt I was younger and consequently dumber at the nuances of drainage, soil types and sun exposure, and my trial failed with the bulbs rotting during the Wet season. I have plenty of bulbs at my mother's place, but don't want to waste them as such. Climatic extremes at Camden NSW last year of 45c ( 113f ) to -4.9c ( 23.2f ) did not bother them.

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Morabeza
On 1/10/2019 at 2:52 PM, greysrigging said:

Interesting.... you manage to grow H coccineus in your climate ?  Does the modest altitude help ? I would love to try them in my tropical lowland climate, my one previous attempt I was younger and consequently dumber at the nuances of drainage, soil types and sun exposure, and my trial failed with the bulbs rotting during the Wet season. I have plenty of bulbs at my mother's place, but don't want to waste them as such. Climatic extremes at Camden NSW last year of 45c ( 113f ) to -4.9c ( 23.2f ) did not bother them.

628m asl may not seem like much in the way of a cooler climate but here we're surrounded by deep ocean waters that are much cooler than of what surround most tropical islands, this plus the relatively high latitude means that 600m is more like 1600m in Ecuador (ideal for Dictyocaryum!) This altitude doubles as a semi-Mediterranean (subtropical) analogue (temperatures only, not rainfall or humidity), sort of like Auckland but with much more rain and a degree or so warmer (C). I grow most of them under cover out of the rain, but some summer rainfall species can actually bear the rain given full sun exposure and entirely inorganic (pure cinder or pumice) growing media.

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Tracy

Thanks to a tip from Nathan ( Silas_Sancona  ), I was able to find some bulbs online.  I just got them in and planted them.  I'm trying 4 different species of Haemanthus: pauculifolius, deformis, coccinius and unifoliatus.  I decided to start with them all in pots for now.  Depending on how successful I am over the next year, I will then assess for putting some in the ground.  I'm looking forward to watching these grow!

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Silas_Sancona

:greenthumb: 

Nice starter sized specimens they sent too!   Will be watching to see how they perform for you also. 

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epiphyte

My friend's favorite story is how she stuck a broken off Haemanthus flower stalk into a pot and it started to grow.  Here's a pic I recently took of her Sxadoxus puniceous...

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Oh, now that I'm thinking about it, I think you met her at Sunset Valley Orchids.  She has quite a few different Haemanthus and Sxadoxus, I'm sure that she'd be happy to share some with you.  

Last fall we tried crossing Scadoxus membranaceus and multiflorus.  We got three seeds, mine has put out a root but no shoot yet.  It might not be a cross though since it was hard to avoid accidentally self-pollinating the flower.  

I've been growing a Scadoxus membranaceus epiphytically for quite a while.  It was a seedling when I attached it to the mount, and it's still pretty much the same size.  The seedling that I potted is much larger.  

So far the best bulb for growing epiphytically is the pregnant onion.  But it's not like I've tried to grow many bulbs epiphytically.  

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Tracy
On 2/24/2019 at 8:25 AM, Silas_Sancona said:

Will be watching to see how they perform for you also.

Haemanthus unifoliatus in the orange pot and a coccineus in the adjacent black pot after about 9 months.

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Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, Tracy said:

Haemanthus unifoliatus in the orange pot and a coccineus in the adjacent black pot after about 9 months.

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Nice!,  Was about to shoot you a PM to see how these were doing..

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Tracy

In the light blue pot a pair of Haemanthus pauculifolius, while the ones planted as solitary plants are Haemanthus deformis.  These are the plants I posted above that I got in February.  All have survived and seem to have gotten a little bigger.

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Tracy

My weekend trip to the San Diego Zoo's Safari Park and seeing these in bloom prompted me to take photos of my own plants.  I'm still a ways off from having a colony like the ones they have there but I certainly enjoyed seeing them in bloom.

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Tracy
On 12/4/2019 at 5:03 PM, Tracy said:

Haemanthus deformis.

 

On 12/4/2019 at 5:03 PM, Tracy said:

20191202-104A5173.jpg

 

No flowers but good growth on the H. deformis.  What appeared to be lips opening above was new leaves emerging and it is still retaining the old leaflets.  Hopefully I'm getting closer to flowering age with these!

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