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Josue Diaz

A few of my palms from today

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Josue Diaz

It's been gloomy and cold here these last few weeks - we even had frost twice last week. We got quite a bit of rain these last few days (by California standards at least) but today, the day was rather warm (63F) so I took the opportunity to spend a bit of time in my yard. Here are a few pictures, I hope you enjoy them :)

First, Bismarkia

20190107_133321.jpg

Edited by Josue Diaz
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Trachycarpus fortunei- showing some yellowing from too much sun last summer. 

20190107_133917.jpg

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Copernicia baileyana from Joe in Texas. This is the one from this thread.

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A dypsis decipiens from the Container Ranch of Doom (Doomsdave's yard).

20190107_134024.jpg

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Beccariophoenix alfredii. Same one from this thread.

20190107_134122.jpg

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Dypsis lutescens.

20190107_134138.jpg

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The wimpy Brahea pimo from this thread.

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Brahea Super Silver. Jubaeopsis is in the back. 

20190107_134233.jpg

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Chamaedorea plumosa 

20190107_134301.jpg

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A brahea dulcis making a comeback after being on the verge of death from neglect. 

20190107_134320.jpg

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Parajubaea sunkha 

20190107_134337.jpg

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Syagrus x Montgomeryana (schizophylla x romanzoffiana) 

20190107_134420.jpg

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New fronds opening up on this hybrid (x Montgomeryana)

20190107_134445.jpg

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Allagoptera arenaria

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Sabal yapa

20190107_134520.jpg

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One of my smaller Chambeyronia houailou

20190107_134533.jpg

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Chamaedorea woodsoniana "large seed" from Floribunda. It is recovering from being run over and snapped in half by a pack of very playful Huskies. 

20190107_134557.jpg

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Chamaedorea benziei

20190107_134611.jpg

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And a few non-palm plants. 

This is a tillsandia xerographica, bilbergia 'Santa Barbara Sunset' and some unknown epiphyllum

20190107_134248.jpg

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Hoya obvata (I think) with tradescantia. Heliconia scheidiana, chamaedorea seifrizii and archontophoenix in the background. 

20190107_134434.jpg

Edited by Josue Diaz
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Palm Tree Jim

Looking good.

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Stevetoad

got some good stuff in there

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Stevetoad

How cold do you get?

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Josue Diaz
22 minutes ago, Stevetoad said:

How cold do you get?

mid to low 30s every winter. We are technically a zone 9b, sunset zone 9 (thermal belts of the central valley where citrus is grown commercially.) Overnight lows have been in the 40s up until Dec 27th when we had this progression of lows:

38

35

35

34

37

33

33

33

34

41

43

51

The next 15 days are forecast to be between 42 and 51 for lows, just barely breaking 60F during the day. 

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gilles06

Good job, i want to see your garden in ten years...

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Zifool

SCREAMM for ur hybrid ! :yay:

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Josue Diaz
9 hours ago, gilles06 said:

Good job, i want to see your garden in ten years...

Thank you! All of my palms are rather young. I hope that they will begin to put on some size, given that they spent the last year (hopefully) establishing roots. Just recently, I remember driving up to my home and suddenly noticing the Bismarkia from the street. Around this time last year, it was so small that you wouldn't notice it from afar. 

8 hours ago, Zifool said:

SCREAMM for ur hybrid ! :yay:

Pretty neat looking plant huh?! I wish I had a few more of these. 

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jimmyt

Josue,

    You have a Paradise and it will get better in time.  Congrats Man!

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Hillizard

Josue: Very nice picture catalog of your collection! :greenthumb: Your B. alfredii looks great, esp. compared to mine (in a pot). I suspect there may be a lot of individual variation in tolerance to low temps in that species.

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akamu

Yard looks  great  .but I think your chambey houlaiou might be a C hookerii the houlaiou tends to hold on to its bifid leaf at this age for much longer either way it looks great  And benzeii is an awesome palm when it gets bigger one of my favorite  chamaedoreas . Cheers

On 1/7/2019, 2:06:12, Josue Diaz said:

One of my smaller Chambeyronia houailou

20190107_134533.jpg

 

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Tom in Tucson
On 1/7/2019, 3:11:36, Josue Diaz said:

And a few non-palm plants. 

This is a tillsandia xerographica, bilbergia 'Santa Barbara Sunset' and some unknown epiphyllum

20190107_134248.jpg

Your cactus might be a Cryptocereus anthonyanus (Selenicereus anthonyanus)

Hi 68˚, Lo 39˚

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Silas_Sancona
24 minutes ago, Tom in Tucson said:

Your cactus might be a Cryptocereus anthonyanus (Selenicereus anthonyanus)

Hi 68˚, Lo 39˚

Tom, i was thinking either that or Eipphyllum anguliger. Had both at one time, Thought Cryptocereus a.  had narrower leaflets.  Great species either way.   

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Swolte

Great garden, thanks for sharing! So much color and I like how you combined some of the grasses. Nice example of a garden that is interesting in all seasons!

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Josue Diaz
19 hours ago, Hillizard said:

Josue: Very nice picture catalog of your collection! :greenthumb: Your B. alfredii looks great, esp. compared to mine (in a pot). I suspect there may be a lot of individual variation in tolerance to low temps in that species.

Thanks! My potted alfredii don't look too great. Maybe these just prefer being in the ground? Did yours suffer from cold damage?

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Josue Diaz
21 hours ago, jimmyt said:

Josue,

    You have a Paradise and it will get better in time.  Congrats Man!

Thank you, my only wish is I lived in a place with less frost and a bit of summer rain.

11 hours ago, Tom in Tucson said:

Your cactus might be a Cryptocereus anthonyanus (Selenicereus anthonyanus)

Hi 68˚, Lo 39˚

10 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Tom, i was thinking either that or Eipphyllum anguliger. Had both at one time, Thought Cryptocereus a.  had narrower leaflets.  Great species either way.   

Hmm, I bought this one at a plant sale at Fresno State University. Their horticulture students propagate lots of cool plants but do a poor job of labeling anything. This was one mixed in with lots of other succulents including several hylocereus.

 

9 hours ago, Swolte said:

Great garden, thanks for sharing! So much color and I like how you combined some of the grasses. Nice example of a garden that is interesting in all seasons!

Thank you for the kind comments! I just added quite a handful of stipa tenuissima and some dwarf pennisetum surrounding some of my palms and agaves. Both of my neighbors' yards are landscaped with grasses and native plants so the grasses help my garden blend in to theirs a bit.

 

12 hours ago, akamu said:

Yard looks  great  .but I think your chambey houlaiou might be a C hookerii the houlaiou tends to hold on to its bifid leaf at this age for much longer either way it looks great  And benzeii is an awesome palm when it gets bigger one of my favorite  chamaedoreas . Cheers

 

 

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Silas_Sancona
42 minutes ago, Josue Diaz said:

 

Hmm, I bought this one at a plant sale at Fresno State University. Their horticulture students propagate lots of cool plants but do a poor job of labeling anything. This was one mixed in with lots of other succulents including several hylocereus.

 

 

 

You'll know for sure once it flowers.. E. anguligar will have white flowers w/  copper colored sepals.  Selenicereus a. flowers are more light, Banana yellowish with reddish or magenta colored sepals. Petals are narrower as well.  Thinking both are fragrant, the Epi. is for sure. Fruit on it is supposed to be edible.

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Hillizard
3 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

Thanks! My potted alfredii don't look too great. Maybe these just prefer being in the ground? Did yours suffer from cold damage?

Yes, every frond, whether older or newer, is now spotted on my B. alfredii. The last one of these I tried in my berm fried in the summer sun. I may plant out some of my seedlings in my yard this spring in different sun exposures to find the optimum location.:unsure:

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Josue Diaz
38 minutes ago, Hillizard said:

Yes, every frond, whether older or newer, is now spotted on my B. alfredii. The last one of these I tried in my berm fried in the summer sun. I may plant out some of my seedlings in my yard this spring in different sun exposures to find the optimum location.:unsure:

I planted a 1-strap-leaf seedling in Chowchilla, which gets significantly colder than me in Fresno. It hasn't had any damage in the two years it's been in the ground. It looks like it might start producing split leaves soon. So perhaps being in ther ground helps quite a bit with this species. 

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Jubaea

Your garden is looking good.  I have seen some of your other threads and am surprised what you have growing.  I'm curious how your irrigate your palms?

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Josue Diaz
2 hours ago, Hillizard said:

Yes, every frond, whether older or newer, is now spotted on my B. alfredii. The last one of these I tried in my berm fried in the summer sun. I may plant out some of my seedlings in my yard this spring in different sun exposures to find the optimum location.:unsure:

The leaf tips on the two oldest fronds are burned. The rest of the fronds appear unaffected. 

20190109_130538.jpg

Compare it to frost damage on the leaf tips to Syagrus romanzoffiana. If B. alfredii turns out to be a fast grower in my climate, then cosmetic damage like this won't really matter, much like it doesn't matter with S. romanzoffiana. 

20190109_130335.thumb.jpg.a5d9ac13cf8e84

Edited by Josue Diaz
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