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enigma99

Post your winter yard pics

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enigma99

Well winter is here, and I'm curious how everyone's yard is looking. For me, I regret putting in so many species, everything is a grown together mess. That and I have had no time to prune and keep it clean. Pics taken a couple days ago.

 

Dypsis Decaryi - Still small but took the heat amazingly well. This southern wall is HOT in the summer
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These were 1g Beccariophoenix Alfredii from floribunda. Growing fastest in the sun with lots of water. My shade ones are really slow though.
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Roystonea Regia, lost in the foliage. It's going into it's second winter. Foreground is a Pritchardia Remota
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A. Alexandrae. This one I got as a 2-3 gal from Lowe's. Was sold as Cunninghamia. Thanks to Ben for finding these! Finally starting to trunk and put on some nice size.
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A. Illawarra in the foreground. Was planted back in 2010 but sat in shock for 3-4 years, now 18'+ overall.

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Len's Tribear. Doing good through the summer.
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dypsis ambositrae
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Bird's nest fern
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A. Purpurea 
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My oldest and largest B. Aldredii. About 6' overall. But it's been in the shade and thus a little slower
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Small Tribear I'm growing. Love these!
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K.O.
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Small but kinda old R. rivularis in the back. These things are total slugs for me.
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My biggest P. roebelenii, about 10' overall
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arenga engleri
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R. baueri.. Just noticed now that the Parajubaea torallyi var. torallyi is starting to get tall in the background. 
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One of my C. Macrocarpas
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C. Metallica
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Coco Queen & Archontophoenix Cunninghamania
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Jacurandas are getting big. Don't miss the old plum tree I had to cut down!
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Coco Queen and more Archontophoenix Cunninghamania
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A. Maxima
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Acanthophoenix Rubra
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P. beccariana
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beccariophoenix madagascariensis behind the bottle
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Edited by enigma99
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LJG

You have done a great job with your garden. But I have to ask (cause someone will anyway), you don't plan on leaving those Beccariophoenix there do you? 

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PalmatierMeg

I second Len. Each of those alfredii will eventually fill up that little alley and then some. What they will do to that wood fence....... I saw an adult on when I visited Dale Holton. I couldn't believe how huge it was.

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enigma99
20 minutes ago, LJG said:

You have done a great job with your garden. But I have to ask (cause someone will anyway), you don't plan on leaving those Beccariophoenix there do you? 

I was hoping to chip away the concrete to make room. How fat do these trunks get? They have been in the ground for a while now so probably wouldn’t appreciate being moved..

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LJG

It will knock over your fence. These are huge. Here is mine. Look close at 5 gallon pot to right. 

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enigma99

Wow Len. Is that like 3ft in diameter?

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Josue Diaz

That's an amazing job you've done! It looks like the photos could've been taken in San Diego or South Florida. I don't have any mature palms, so my yard lacks the vertical elements at this stage. i have full sun exposure so I use lots of grasses and sun loving perennials while I can. Here are a few shots. 

 

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Josue Diaz

Succulents look great this time of year. Also, the proteas and leucospermums in the big pots are coming into their season. i keep them potted to avoid having any fertilizers reach the delicate root systems. 

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Josue Diaz

That ginkgo tree is likely as old as the house (95 yrs)

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Josue Diaz

Dypsis decipiens up front. Perennial bunch grasses throughout. And these 3 Aloe striata that are a ghostly purpleish-white.

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Josue Diaz

some non-palm pics. Aloe striata that recently split in two

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Josue Diaz

Aloe vanbalenii

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Josue Diaz

mixed echeverias

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Josue Diaz

new leaf flush on my Hass Avocados. I am using two of these as street trees out front in the parking strip

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Josue Diaz

A little prestononiana I've had in the ground for two years. It came from Floribunda and went into the ground summer 2016 from a little 4 inch pot. This will be its third winter and has grown slowly, but steadily. 

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enigma99

 Very nice Josue. You got better spacing than I do. How is your Wodyetia doing?

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Josue Diaz

my wodyetia keeps growing. I think it might clear the roofline this next year. Once out of that protection, it's days may be numbered. 

 

also, my plumeria set inflorescens too late in the year. I doubt they'll develop and bloom now that it's winter. My three plumeria have started their annual leaf drop. Do yours bloom? yours appear to be partly shaded. 

1 hour ago, enigma99 said:

 Very nice Josue. You got better spacing than I do. How is your Wodyetia doing?

 

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Edited by Josue Diaz
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enigma99
3 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

 My three plumeria have started their annual leaf drop. Do yours bloom? yours appear to be partly shaded. 

Yes a little. But my plumeria in the sun do much better. It was a spot that I had, and the plumeria was getting too big for a pot so it had to go in the ground.

All your stuff is looking good. I am actually in fresno for a couple hours today but wouldn’t have enough for a PRA. 

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Josue Diaz

anytime! feel free to message me anytime you want to come see what I've got growing

Edited by Josue Diaz

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Josue Diaz
1 hour ago, enigma99 said:

Yes a little. But my plumeria in the sun do much better. It was a spot that I had, and the plumeria was getting too big for a pot so it had to go in the ground.

All your stuff is looking good. I am actually in fresno for a couple hours today but wouldn’t have enough for a PRA. 

 

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Tracy
On 11/29/2018, 5:39:42, enigma99 said:

Well winter is here, and I'm curious how everyone's yard is looking.

Almost for us in the Northern Hemisphere, but not quite yet... counting down for almost 3 weeks yet before it's arrival and our friends in the southern hemisphere counting down to summer's start.  Not that some cold clear Santa Ana nights this time of year don't rival the coldest nights of winter in my neck of the desert.

After a full summer and momentum still carrying through autumn, this is also when gardens in my micro-climate look their best.  After our first big rain in many months, everything looks refreshed and clean.  A little Dypsis bef (slow but consistent), a Caryota (fast and getting big), or breakfast/snack food ripening at the beginning of December.  In a "normal winter" if there is such a thing, January is when things really slow down.  Short days, cold damp weather and no momentum from summer left, January is the real deal when it comes to winter here.

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Josue Diaz
17 hours ago, Tracy said:

Almost for us in the Northern Hemisphere, but not quite yet... counting down for almost 3 weeks yet before it's arrival and our friends in the southern hemisphere counting down to summer's start.  Not that some cold clear Santa Ana nights this time of year don't rival the coldest nights of winter in my neck of the desert.

After a full summer and momentum still carrying through autumn, this is also when gardens in my micro-climate look their best.  After our first big rain in many months, everything looks refreshed and clean.  A little Dypsis bef (slow but consistent), a Caryota (fast and getting big), or breakfast/snack food ripening at the beginning of December.  In a "normal winter" if there is such a thing, January is when things really slow down.  Short days, cold damp weather and no momentum from summer left, January is the real deal when it comes to winter here.

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I totally agree here. After the first major rainstorm, the ground is still warm, plants (especially water loving tropicals and palms) soak it all up and look their best. We haven't gone below 40F yet, but our coldest weeks on average are still ahead - the last two weeks of Dec and first two of Jan. After that, we start the slow, creeping climb in temps.

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Josue Diaz

Here is my backyard from just a few minutes ago. Those deciduous trees have dropped their leaves already so they let in much- needed sunlight this time of year.I have a lot of Chamaedorea in this area to the right - ernesti-augusti, radicalis, elegans, cataractarum, benziei, hooperiana, woodsononiana, seifrizii. And behind those stacked chairs I have a grouping of Chamaedorea plumosa. The palm in the center of the patio is Syagrus schizophylla x romanzoffiana. The baskets hanging from the trees are home to Hoya obvata and other un-named species  (If anyone is curious, Hoya do fine with low 30's. They spend all winter outdoors in frigid Fresno. I don't ever cover them or bring them in, but I'm sure the overhead branches offer some degree of protection from frost). Heliconia schediana make up the bulk of the greenery in the background. There's a tall Archontophoenix hidden behind the mass of trunks - you can see some arching fronds just below the roofline of the house. A Brugmansia is holding on to a couple of light pink flowers on the far right side. Out of the frame of the picture on the right side is my potting area - those are @DoomsDave Tuckerii of DoomTMin the white grow bags. The Phoenix canariensis behind the lattice structure belongs to my neighbor, but shades and graces our side as well.

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Edited by Josue Diaz
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enigma99
5 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

Here is my backyard from just a few minutes ago. 

Perfect spot for the coco queen. Love that. Also want to do some flagstone too. Maybe next year...

I agree with Tracy that December still has some decent growth and isn’t until January when things really slow down. But for me, December is historically the coldest month. I think it’s just the cool wet hasn’t set in yet. Then I will have to be pumping water out of the ground often in efforts to keep tropicals happy...

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Josue Diaz
1 hour ago, enigma99 said:

Perfect spot for the coco queen. Love that. Also want to do some flagstone too. Maybe next year...

the flagstone patio is perfect for us. it gives us a more natural look as the edges aren't perfectly straight and the plantings on either side kind of spill into the patio. If you're going to plant anything between the stones, I'd recommend using polymeric sand to bind the spaces between stones. It suppresses weeds but allows water to permeate. we tried filling with groundcovers but battling weeds was too much work. And small rocks got kicked around and had to be swept up constantly. 

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sandgroper

Great thread! Will be interesting to see how your winters compare to ours. It was 38c (100.4) here in Perth yesterday but fortunately cooler today but it won't be long before we get the warm weather here to stay for a while. 

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Tracy
12 hours ago, enigma99 said:

I agree with Tracy that December still has some decent growth and isn’t until January when things really slow down. But for me, December is historically the coldest month. I think it’s just the cool wet hasn’t set in yet.

I've hit some of my coldest mornings around Thanksgiving in some years.  It is because in my micro-climate it isn't the winter storms that give us the coldest night.   The cold clear Santa Ana nights (offshore winds from the desert) when the wind stops blowing early are the brutal nights here.  Cold Santa Ana winds can happen in late autumn through winter, so it really depends on when they occur as opposed to the shortest nights of winter driving the most extreme events.  I always get excited when winter officially arrives because that means days start getting longer, so outdoor daylight play time starts to increase again!!!

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Matt in OC
18 hours ago, Josue Diaz said:

Here is my backyard from just a few minutes ago. Those deciduous trees have dropped their leaves already so they let in much- needed sunlight this time of year.I have a lot of Chamaedorea in this area to the right - ernesti-augusti, radicalis, elegans, cataractarum, benziei, hooperiana, woodsononiana, seifrizii. And behind those stacked chairs I have a grouping of Chamaedorea plumosa. The palm in the center of the patio is Syagrus schizophylla x romanzoffiana. The baskets hanging from the trees are home to Hoya obvata and other un-named species  (If anyone is curious, Hoya do fine with low 30's. They spend all winter outdoors in frigid Fresno. I don't ever cover them or bring them in, but I'm sure the overhead branches offer some degree of protection from frost). Heliconia schediana make up the bulk of the greenery in the background. There's a tall Archontophoenix hidden behind the mass of trunks - you can see some arching fronds just below the roofline of the house. A Brugmansia is holding on to a couple of light pink flowers on the far right side. Out of the frame of the picture on the right side is my potting area - those are @DoomsDave Tuckerii of DoomTMin the white grow bags. The Phoenix canariensis behind the lattice structure belongs to my neighbor, but shades and graces our side as well.

20181203_144853.jpg

I love this and will keep it in mind for when the kids are older and don't need a long stretch of patio. In goes a big shade palm!

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James B

Your Maxima looks great. Like a little Royal!

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Tracy

Since it's the last day before winter 2018/19 starts, I think its time to post once more from late Autumn!  New Caledonia palms seem to love this time of year.  Cyphophoenix elegans opening a new leaf, Burretiokentia koghiensis leaf almost completely open now, and flowers showing on the Burretiokentia hapala inflorescence.  Winter begins tomorrow, Friday December 21st and thereafter days will be getting longer in the northern hemisphere!

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enigma99

Tracy those are looking good. That inflo pic is crazy. I tried a 5g Burretiokentia hapala this Spring and was dead by Fall. I think it was too dry.. maybe they are super finicky. After seeing yours, I will have to try again. 

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ruskinPalms

Been rather cool, rainy and windy the past few days. Way wetter than usual for winter here. Here are a few yard pics from today. 

 

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sandgroper

40c (104f) here today, the garden wont like that much.

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pj_orlando_z9b
On 12/2/2018, 12:14:04, Josue Diaz said:

That ginkgo tree is likely as old as the house (95 yrs)

Screenshot_20181202-091142_Gallery.jpg

Love your landscaping. Great job!

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pj_orlando_z9b

Backyard. The crotons get great color in winter and the dwarf princess tree explodes with blossoms.

20181222_141312.jpg

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pj_orlando_z9b

Beccariophoenix alfredii in the front is about 4x4. Planted in March 2018, it needs minimal care. Unphased by rain or dry periods. Very consistent grower. 

20181222_170057.jpg

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Tracy
On 12/20/2018, 8:12:39, enigma99 said:

I tried a 5g Burretiokentia hapala this Spring and was dead by Fall. I think it was too dry.. maybe they are super finicky.

They do appreciate water and humidity, but don't demand too much heat.  Winter and Summer arrived (depending on one's hemisphere) on the 21st.  Being from the northern hemisphere it's winter, but I do appreciate seeing what's happening down under too, as summer begins.  I'm always cheered by the beginning of longer days which coincides with the start of Winter!  The Winter Solstice started as a foggy overcast one in my neighborhood.  A Dypsis (acquired as D cabadae), looking more like another D pembana as it has grown on this first day of Northern Hemisphere Winter:  Fog is the background not surprisingly.

 

20181221-104A1955.jpg

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cisco

Don't be afraid. It's just snow and -10 ° C. Damn. :D

Merry Christmas! 

20181223_092921.jpg

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sandgroper
42 minutes ago, cisco said:

Don't be afraid. It's just snow and -10 ° C. Damn. :D

Merry Christmas! 

20181223_092921.jpg

Crickey!

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