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DoomsDave

Mass PRA in Anaheim Hills California November 17 2018

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DoomsDave

The PSSC’s much ballyhooed meeting at the home and garden of Patrick and Jolynn  Mahoney was attended by more than 100 - some say up to about 150 - palm nuts, spouses children and friends on Saturday November 17, 2018. 

 

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DoomsDave

There was so many people we ran out of food!

Everyone swooned en masse to the sheer palmy overload plus Ficus, Magnolias, tree ferns, and of course [expletive] cycads.

A38E648C-4890-49C6-AD41-22C8EEA5EFA2.thu

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DoomsDave

Two acres of water falls, a pool, four restrooms (always a major plus!), cobblestone paths, my brain is seizing up from try to process it. 

 

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DoomsDave

Where will this path lead?

38435F9F-2B08-4011-BA2C-D3C7EDB6AF53.thu

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DoomsDave

Look up!

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DoomsDave

Keep looking up!

73828872-4777-4302-8EC2-DCAF47B72CFA.thu

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DoomsDave

Thanks to many Palm Talkers who attended!

@joe_OC, @bgl, @BS Man about Palms, @Kim and so many many more.

Dunno what the auction total is yet but I think we did well!

 

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Moose

No smoke of Doom?

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DoomsDave
2 minutes ago, Moose said:

No smoke of Doom?

Nope. We were far from the fires, this time.

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joe_OC

3 acres of palm bliss.  At times, it was like the Mahoney's lived in the "Jungle Cruise" at Disneyland.  There wasn't a lot of rare palms, but it did not matter because of the scale of it.  Walking under the densely planted canopy of Kings and Kentias, I felt like I was in Hawaii and not Anaheim Hills.    

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kinzyjr

I loved the walkways.  That's how I want my walkway to look when my coconuts and sea grapes grow in around it.

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Darold Petty

Dave, what is the luxuriant groundcover in the fourth photo ?  Possibly just large Aspidistra, or something else ?

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joe_OC
37 minutes ago, Darold Petty said:

Dave, what is the luxuriant groundcover in the fourth photo ?  Possibly just large Aspidistra, or something else ?

Hi Darald,

Yes, they use Aspidistra (cast iron plant) extensively along the shady pathways.  

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Darold Petty

Thanks Joe !

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bgl

What an absolutely amazing garden! :) A very intricate maze of paths that were intersecting with water features and lots of mature vegetation and the "end result" is a tropical rainforest that truly feels like Hawaii, and this is in the heart of Orange County in Southern California. Incredible! :)

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DoomsDave
28 minutes ago, bgl said:

What an absolutely amazing garden! :) A very intricate maze of paths that were intersecting with water features and lots of mature vegetation and the "end result" is a tropical rainforest that truly feels like Hawaii, and this is in the heart of Orange County in Southern California. Incredible! :)

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 If you had said this was Borneo or SIngapore, I would have believed you!

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Kim

I took way too many photos... it was that kind of home and garden. Eye candy at every turn, surprises, thrills, trails to reawaken your inner Marco Polo explorer mode. The house is named The Lost World, and you really feel you have entered a wrinkle in time and space to arrive here. This can't be Anaheim, California! Enjoy.

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Kim

We were permitted to explore indoors. Waterfalls and gardens outside every window. A wine cellar with the Lost World theme painted on the the walls. Exotic art beyond every boulder and palm trunk. A few familiar visitors.

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Kim

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Kim

Everyone seemed awed and entertained!  Great meeting followed by a great palm auction! 

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GottmitAlex

Holy smokes! That is an amazing place. Sure looks like the jungle cruise @Disney.

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DoomsDave
4 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

Holy smokes! That is an amazing place. Sure looks like the jungle cruise @Disney.

It’s sure enough amazing!

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joe_OC
12 hours ago, DoomsDave said:

Thanks to many Palm Talkers who attended!

@joe_OC, @bgl, @BS Man about Palms, @Kim and so many many more.

Dunno what the auction total is yet but I think we did well!

 

Who else from PalmTalk was there?  

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Moose
5 hours ago, joe_OC said:

Who else from PalmTalk was there?  

Where is Bill?

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Jesse
11 hours ago, Kim said:

 

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I was there also. What an amazing garden! I walked it twice and could have walked it 5 more times. I was in jungle cruse harmony here.  Beautiful palms, philodendrons, many other plants, architecture, accents, lighting, water features, and pathways.  This garden had it all. Even great as a family outing.

My son is on the left and my father to the right. Thanks @Kim for taking these pictures! My Father Greg and my Mother Linda are the ones who introduced me to palms and for that I am thankful. My heart overflows when I watch my son running around gardens blabbering and wanting to explore. My parents must feel the same way.

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hbernstein

It's quite impressive.

Not to upset anyone, but how do you irrigate (legally) this kind of landscape in SoCal? It's got to require a lot of water.

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DoomsDave
22 minutes ago, hbernstein said:

It's quite impressive.

Not to upset anyone, but how do you irrigate (legally) this kind of landscape in SoCal? It's got to require a lot of water.

It's not as much as you might think. First, many soils in California are clay, which holds water well. Second, grass lawns are HUGE water hawgs compared to a palm garden, though they still take their share. My lush palm garden takes about 1/3 the water that half an acre of lawn would take, especially in the summer time.

That said, someday we will likely face water restrictions of the total type, i.e., no penalties, just use too much and get cut off.

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Kris

Beautiful place and lovely visuals...And thanks everyone for those visuals.

Love,

Kris.

Btw. Dave and Bill where are you...?

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hbernstein
6 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

It's not as much as you might think. First, may soils in California are clay, which holds water well. Second, grass lawns are HUGE water hawgs compared to a palm garden, though they still take their share. My lush palm garden takes about 1/3 the water that half an acre of lawn would take, especially in the summer time.

That said, someday we will likely face water restrictions of the total type, i.e., no penalties, just use too much and get cut off.

Yes. I've been to Palm Desert and couldn't believe that I was seeing lawns being watered in the heat of the day in June. I suppose that's the only way to keep the turf alive.

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DoomsDave
1 minute ago, Kris said:

Beautiful place and lovely visuals...And thanks everyone for those visuals.

Love,

Kris.

Btw. Dave and Bill where are you...?

I was too busy officiating at the meeting to pose for pictures, and no one happened to get one of me they posted here.

Yet.

dave

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Kris
8 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

I was too busy officiating at the meeting to pose for pictures, and no one happened to get one of me they posted here.

Yet.

dave

I understand that,Since most of the time this happens to me in the parties that i attend.Taking pictures of friends and relatives and sending them in whatsapp...finally i realize iam not to be seen in a single frame ! :)

 

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Jesse
29 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

I was too busy officiating at the meeting to pose for pictures, and no one happened to get one of me they posted here.

Yet.

dave

This one is for you Dave. A candid, of you working so hard to rake in that needed money for the PSSC, as well as allowing collectors and newbies acquire the gardens/palms of their dreams.

But this is picture actually gives scale to the massive size and maturity of this garden.

20181117_131442.jpg

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Jesse
55 minutes ago, hbernstein said:

It's quite impressive.

Not to upset anyone, but how do you irrigate (legally) this kind of landscape in SoCal? It's got to require a lot of water.

Adding to the above explanations: Another way this is done is responsibly designed and tuned drip irrigation systems using reclaimed water working with the shape of the landscape.  It may be hard to tell in the pictures but there was a decent change in elevation throughout the garden.  I noticed that drip lines were carefully running atop the slopes allowing the excess water to trickle down to other plants without the need for more sprinkler distribution.  This allows for very efficient irrigation distribution.

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DoomsDave
34 minutes ago, Jesse said:

This one is for you Dave. A candid, of you working so hard to rake in that needed money for the PSSC, as well as allowing collectors and newbies acquire the gardens/palms of their dreams.

But this is picture actually gives scale to the massive size and maturity of this garden.

20181117_131442.jpg

Jesse, thanks! Post some more, maybe?

Great picture of that Cyphosperma balansae from Larry's collection. I had a pair of little ones, but his was stupendous. Don't remember what it went for.

Hmm. I think next time I'll go for that Don Martin / Don Tollefson look. Or maybe back to Mad About Plaid . . . . .

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Josue Diaz

Holy wow! That is an amazing garden. I could get lost in there on purpose. 

 

8 hours ago, hbernstein said:

It's quite impressive.

Not to upset anyone, but how do you irrigate (legally) this kind of landscape in SoCal? It's got to require a lot of water.

Southern California and SF Bay Area water agencies haven't really had a strong hand with water regulations. The LA basin receives it's flow from the vast network of rivers in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys, the Colorado River and Owens Valley. The the city of San Francisco has exclusive rights to Hetch Hetchy within Yosemite National Park with it's non-stop flow from the Tuolumne River. Water restrictions have been most heavily placed on agencies in Central and Northern CA - ironically, where the water flows from after it comes out of the Cascade Mountains and the Sierra Nevada (a touchy subject around here). Commercial ag crops have largely switched to drip systems - think hundreds of thousands of acres of almonds, citrus, peaches, grapes, etc on drip irrigation. And residential water usage is closely monitored - at least in Fresno it is. I received a note this year telling me my house would be monitored to make sure I was complying with the city's watering schedule - outdoor watering only on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. A verbal warning for the first offense, $50 the second, $100 the third and so on. The city has an app where neighbors can report water offenders also :bemused:. At the peak of the drought, Central CA looked like a wasteland but if you drove to Southern CA or the Bay Area, the drought was not much more than a of series reports about drought in a faraway land - no visible changes - so it seemed. (written without any bias...obviously :innocent: :floor:)

Edited by Josue Diaz
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DoomsDave
On 11/18/2018, 12:13:50, Darold Petty said:

Dave, what is the luxuriant groundcover in the fourth photo ?  Possibly just large Aspidistra, or something else ?

I concur with @joe_OC; it’s Aspadistra.

 

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BS Man about Palms

I am alive, I WAS there and had a great time at a beautiful place and was happy to Visit and witness' Sir Daves garden after!! Now to get back with some daylight!!

 

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Palm Tree Jim
On 11/19/2018, 5:58:30, hbernstein said:

It's quite impressive.

Not to upset anyone, but how do you irrigate (legally) this kind of landscape in SoCal? It's got to require a lot of water.

Some good explanations above.

Also, it would still be expensive.

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redant

Incredible, does anyone know how many acres?  

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bgl

Two acres, and that's straight from Pat Mahoney, the owner.

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      We held our banquet last year here and loved it so much we came back again this year. Wonder why we loved it so much? Oh, count the ways! A great and growing palm collection, which includes palms that PSSC members have donated. A great and growing collection of other plants, as the garden management scours the globe for great material.


       
      And, plenty of free parking, handicapped access, an elegant dining room, and relatively easy access by pretty much everyone in southern California. What’s not to love?


       
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