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Hillizard

California Wildfires - 2018

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kinzyjr

Hope that they get this situation under control soon.

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Hillizard
2 minutes ago, kinzyjr said:

Hope that they get this situation under control soon.

The forecast is for several days of rain next week in California. That can only help the situation, as long as there are no mudslides in the just-burned areas.:unsure:

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