Jump to content
Tyrone

Rhopalostylis sapida pics

Recommended Posts

Tyrone

I managed to find these Rhopalostylis sapida growing in my area. Our climate is perfect for them and was super excited to find some mature specimens growing here. I made contact with the owner and they were happy for me to post pics. Enjoy.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone

Up loaded pics but they're not there. What the???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone

Try again

IMG_2372.JPG

IMG_2373.JPG

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone

Seed size difference between one lot of palms and another. Any thoughts on where these R sapida would have come from originally in NZ?

IMG_2394.JPG

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cbmnz

New at this, but something about the bulbous crownshaft and very upright crown looks more like pics I've seen of the Great Barrier Island form, than any other.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone
2 hours ago, cbmnz said:

New at this, but something about the bulbous crownshaft and very upright crown looks more like pics I've seen of the Great Barrier Island form, than any other.

Thanks for your comment. As you are close to the action as it were in NZ I appreciate your thoughts. Will have a closer look at the great barrier island form pics on the web. They do have a very upright look to them and the crown shafts seem massive when up close to these palms. The pictures don't really do them justice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darold Petty

The ratio of diameter between the trunk and crownshaft is variable in the nikau palms I grow here in California.  The greatest differential is when the palm is vigorous, and is developing several spadices simultaneously within the crownshaft.  I would be cautious about assigning a geographic identity based just on this one character.  I grow R. sapida x baueri, R. baueri, R. sapida Chatham Island, R. sapida Great Barrier Island, and R. sapida Little Barrier Island.   By far, the most heavy bodied and overall large palm is the Chatham Island form.

  Here is a photo of my R. sapida 'Chatham Island'; but it does not always appear so bulbous.  :)

.  In Keith Boyer's book he shows a massive palm next to a women with big sunglasses and a blue blouse.  I was obsessed for years by this image, until Keith told me that the woman was quite petite, and that they had posed her adjacent to the largest palm they could locate on the small island.

   My plant of R. s. LBI has failed to achieve the dimensions of the one shown in Keith's book and mine just looks like any generic Rhopalostylis. :( 

IMG_5225.JPG

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone

Darold your Chatham is massive. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone

Was looking at the rare palm seeds site and the closest look to the ones I saw here were the Auckland variety. Everything else had a much more open spreading crown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darold Petty
5 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

Darold your Chatham is massive. 

I will try to make an current image from the same perspective later, I'm super busy today !

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tassie_Troy1971

Thanks for the pictures Tyrone - so they are growing in west Australia

My Chatham Rhopalostylis is the most robust form in the garden

 

 

 

42686407_2043914892314793_6874251730280775680_n.jpg

  • Upvote 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
joe_OC

Here is my Catham Island sapida:

catham island.jpg

  • Upvote 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmCode

They're growing well ! 

If I had to guess I'd say they were somewhere from the upper north island or one of the barrier islands.

I took a pic of a North Auckland palm in the area I live.
 

100_2590.JPG

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tassie_Troy1971
On 9/29/2018, 10:25:22, joe_OC said:

Here is my Catham Island sapida:

catham island.jpg

Looks fantastic Jo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone
12 hours ago, PalmCode said:

They're growing well ! 

If I had to guess I'd say they were somewhere from the upper north island or one of the barrier islands.

I took a pic of a North Auckland palm in the area I live.
 

100_2590.JPG

I think that's what they are. I don't have that variety yet. I may have around 3000 coming up now so yippee. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone
On 29/09/2018, 6:20:44, Tassie_Troy1971 said:

Thanks for the pictures Tyrone - so they are growing in west Australia

My Chatham Rhopalostylis is the most robust form in the garden

 

 

 

42686407_2043914892314793_6874251730280775680_n.jpg

Your Chatham looks great.

Since I've moved down all my rhopies woke up. My Chatham's grow quick down here. I'll have to take pics of some of mine. Not quite as bulky as in your pic but getting there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone
On 29/09/2018, 8:25:22, joe_OC said:

Here is my Catham Island sapida:

catham island.jpg

Your Chatham looks great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
joe_OC
On 9/28/2018, 3:20:44, Tassie_Troy1971 said:

Thanks for the pictures Tyrone - so they are growing in west Australia

My Chatham Rhopalostylis is the most robust form in the garden

 

 

 

42686407_2043914892314793_6874251730280775680_n.jpg

I agree about Chatham form being the most robust.  I have two Cheesmanii flanking my Chatham.   They were smaller to start, but the Chatham just towers over both of them.  Trunk diameter is also much smaller for the Cheesmanii.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cbmnz

These are Hamilton, NZ, council plantings, central city riverbank. Starting to trunk now, fronds less than 2m long. If that is genetic not just environmental this would be a good line for smaller gardens, they are not giants.

20180926_124639.thumb.jpg.8983413dbe55b3

Thinking of size as saw some absolutely enormous, presumably Chatham form on the weekend. Made me nervous about the three little PB12 Chathamica have just put in at home(one pictured). Oh well, if in years time they have gotten huge,and are bursting out of their space, it will be a good problem to have!

20180930_154819.thumb.jpg.61c0063ab01fd8   

 

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Manalto

There's no other word but "cute." I hope he appreciates the lack of competition and grows like a weed.

What are council plantings?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cbmnz
6 hours ago, Manalto said:

There's no other word but "cute." I hope he appreciates the lack of competition and grows like a weed.

What are council plantings?

Plantings in a public area by the local city authority. These being native here helps their chances of being chosen for that, a lot. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Manalto

There's a push toward using natives in many municipalities in the US, too. Makes sense for many reasons, especially water consumption.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone
13 hours ago, cbmnz said:

These are Hamilton, NZ, council plantings, central city riverbank. Starting to trunk now, fronds less than 2m long. If that is genetic not just environmental this would be a good line for smaller gardens, they are not giants.

20180926_124639.thumb.jpg.8983413dbe55b3

Thinking of size as saw some absolutely enormous, presumably Chatham form on the weekend. Made me nervous about the three little PB12 Chathamica have just put in at home(one pictured). Oh well, if in years time they have gotten huge,and are bursting out of their space, it will be a good problem to have!

20180930_154819.thumb.jpg.61c0063ab01fd8   

 

Thanks for the pics. Your little one won't burn in the summer then? I'd be scared to plant one that size in full sun here. It would be interesting to see your comments on that. I try to plant all my rhopies in shade to begin with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cbmnz

Covered the range with the three, one mostly shade, one am sun only and that one, pm sun till about 4pm then shade. Also put in a mainland one in heavy shade. I believe the advantage of the Chatimaca form is that they can take full sun better. Went to a specialist palm nursery and they advertise these as being sun hardened from the start - they were in full sun at the nursery. That said if that one is getting full midday sun as get into summer proper I may put up some shadecloth.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cbmnz

Sorry, must backtrack a little. The Chatham form is advertised to be sun tolerant when larger. And these were in the sun in the plants for sale area of the nursery, unlike their Kentia et al which were all in a big shade house.
However, the nursery has confirmed these 3 year old babies are yet to be exposed to full summer sunlight, so will get some suspended shade cloth over this and the other half day exposed one, sooner rather than later.

These ones in link below are Chatham and are coping well with full sun, wind and salt exposure, but probably went in as PB95's or larger I guess.

https://www.google.com/maps/@-37.6823778,176.1699894,3a,75y,92.85h,76.58t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1syQiDSswG-IXxVsqJiXAPNA!2e0!5s20180201T000000!7i13312!8i6656

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bennz
On 9/30/2018, 11:56:44, Tyrone said:

I think that's what they are. I don't have that variety yet. I may have around 3000 coming up now so yippee. 

Hi Tyrone,

 

 

"Yippee" because you love this form in particular, or because it is a nikau in general? Personally I much prefer the open crown forms, and actually prefer the cheesemanii and similar forms with open crowns and longer bare petiole region (more like Troys chatham palm). Occaisonally you find baueri/cheesemanii types that have almost a flat profile with the leaves held almost horizontally. My favourite type, almost like an old Cyathea medullaris in profile. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone
On 13/10/2018, 4:41:13, Bennz said:

Hi Tyrone,

 

 

"Yippee" because you love this form in particular, or because it is a nikau in general? Personally I much prefer the open crown forms, and actually prefer the cheesemanii and similar forms with open crowns and longer bare petiole region (more like Troys chatham palm). Occaisonally you find baueri/cheesemanii types that have almost a flat profile with the leaves held almost horizontally. My favourite type, almost like an old Cyathea medullaris in profile. 

Yippee cos I only have about 6 seedlings of the north island Auckland variety. Now I have the possibility of many more. I don't mind the upright shuttlecock look. It's pretty distinct. I can't think of another palm that looks like an Auckland nikau. I love the droopier open crown varieties too. Any Rhopalostylis is worth growing in my opinion.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cbmnz

Thought I'd picture  the local form in habitat. These are on the low slopes of Mt Pirongia, just SW of Hamilton, New Zealand.

Seedlings are everywhere, it's hard not to step on them. They are very fern like in this very shady and damp stream valley.

 

20181028_145549.thumb.jpg.b2375c70d085f520181028_145606.thumb.jpg.e826be6017e9e2

You'd wonder where the seeds are coming from, but then you find the adults. Hard to show in photos but the one at back of second photo was a very tall must be very old specimen.

20181028_150133.thumb.jpg.944e8b3bb4853820181028_150526.thumb.jpg.0ecc589a13febc

Then found these ones, in near full sun due to a gap in the canopy. Suspect this is what the "Pirongia form" would look like in gardens.

20181028_151355.thumb.jpg.17271774231968

A part of the track.

20181028_151832.thumb.jpg.651059ae3a4838

  • Upvote 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
joe_OC

Thank you for the pics.  Always great to see palms in habitat!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmCode
On 9/30/2018, 11:56:44, Tyrone said:

I think that's what they are. I don't have that variety yet. I may have around 3000 coming up now so yippee. 

Wow three thousand, have fun with potting up all those.

 

I also find the Chatham form is by far the fastest growing and the largest. They handle the sun the best here as well even at a young age.

Here's a pic of one of my chathams, it's around four and a half years old. It gets plenty of sun and is 1400 mm tall.

chatham.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BPK Palm Addict

Love the upright habit and the fat crownshaft.  What a really cool looking palm.  I wish I could grow one at my house but I'm sure they would not like the summer heat, or the alkaline soil.

Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone
10 hours ago, PalmCode said:

Wow three thousand, have fun with potting up all those.

chatham.jpg

I like mass planting. 

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmCode

I agree, the more the better. You'll find Auckland ones can be very slow growing. One of my ones is just starting to trunk . I think it's around 15 to 20 years old... Good luck with your seeds.

100_2838.JPG

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cbmnz

I know this grove has been well discussed on here, but just wanted to record that I have seen it in person now. Photos from 2 days ago. Crazy how much it feels like you're on a tropical beach,  not 40S of  the equator!

 

P1010573.resized.JPG

45943143_10217020683219932_7906539354573504512_o.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darold Petty

Thanks for posting these photos !  :greenthumb: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
coops 3214

Heres a couple of mine growing in geelong victoria and loving life20181110_174248.thumb.jpg.3477223c5ffa57

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave
On 10/7/2018, 11:40:52, Manalto said:

There's a push toward using natives in many municipalities in the US, too. Makes sense for many reasons, especially water consumption.

Yeah, but be very careful, at least in California. A lot of natives are highly flammable, and I mean H$llfire . . . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave
On 10/29/2018, 4:16:24, Tyrone said:

I like mass planting. 

Mass planting is the best!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×