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GottmitAlex

These guys love to be fertilized with salt (NaCl). Yes, salt!

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palmad Merc

Thought I'd throw some salt on the wound! :P

IMG_20180911_065534_727.jpg

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GottmitAlex
1 hour ago, Rickybobby said:

What a great subject and argument. Last question wether the coconut likes salt or. Not. Does the added salt help keep some bad critters away in the soil?

What critters? Lol.

In my case there's nothing down there except sand and salt. Not many land-loving things live in that medium. 

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palmad Merc
2 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

What critters? Lol.

In my case there's nothing down there except sand and salt. Not many land-loving things live in that medium. 

Hermit crab's :floor:

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Rickybobby
26 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

What critters? Lol.

In my case there's nothing down there except sand and salt. Not many land-loving things live in that medium. 

I meant in your garden or say a pot

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Tyrone

I used to add rock salt to my coconut after reading the Phillipines study many years ago. There was no risk of it leaching elsewhere due to its location. It seemed to love it. It grew well. I didn't give it heaps of it, just a side dressing every few months in the summer. I think it does reduce root fungal attacks that Cocos often get away from the tropics. The rock salt was west Australian rock salt taken from the salt ponds near Dampier where they pump sea water inland a bit then evaporate it. I think the results in the Phillipines study are valid.

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Cluster

Hello Alex,

I think it is nice you bring this discussion on topic, hopefully something will come out of it. I will add my findings and share my observations. 

That study seems to imply plant growth and the overall health of the coconut seems to improve, on the other hand it seems to me it is a study directed towards a tall type. I wonder what the impact would be, say, in your Red Malayan Dwarf. Speaking Portuguese as my native language I am familiar with many some studies from Brazil regarding the Brazilian Green Dwarf (BGD), their main coconut for water. The studies are not as straight forward as this one from the Philippines Coconut Authority (PCA).

On one hand the BGD subjected to salty water irrigation (with different concentrations) showed increased female flowers, but they also aborted more of them. The coconuts seemed to get slightly less water. They did mention that they would yield well commercially if this constant irrigation with salty water is not too concentrated but up to a point and it will affect the crop. Another study says the water of BGD irrigated with salty water increased the sugar levels of the coconut water, it became more pleasant. One problem I see with the Brazilian studies is that they apply the water constantly instead of periodically so it is hard to say how much salt is needed for optimal growth, if it is indeed helpful, that is.

I would say form my observations a bit of salt here and there seems to be positive if you don't mind the other plants around. I will also add I was in Madeira recently and one of the coconuts that I am following more closely was submerged in water during a sea surge, from March to now it increased its size by 50% (I had never seen such speed in Madeira) and it looked almost twice my size in August with very strong and long fronds. The PCA study was more conclusive in what they wanted to show, the Brazilian ones are not 100% conclusive.

 

Regards,

Pedro

Edited by Cluster
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GottmitAlex

Thank you Pedro. One of the main reasons I'm going full Monty on the coconuts, is because I already replaced each one of their plots with 3x3x3m of pure coarse sand. We had WWIII at the haus because of this two years ago. So of course I have been reading and looking into any edge I can get for these cocos. Salt came up, I've been doing it for a year now. No decline up till now. I did lose 2 dwarfs prior to salt. They have since been replaced with others. The red Tahiti has not skipped a beat with the salt.  Oh, I just last month began employing Palmgain (due to forum poster's recommendations). Let's see what happens. It's a gamble and a risk. But one I glady accept over the previous 5 filibustas I had in place.

I will be commenting more on this topic and the pm's. Thank you everyone. Palmtalk is quite educational.  The more I learn, the more I realize I don't know anything. 

guten Abend. 

Alex

 

20180910_174210.jpg

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sandgroper
23 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

 

I've been putting seawater on my coconut, amongst other things, for the past five years and after trying to grow these for years have had the best results ever. My coconut came up to my knee when I planted it five years ago, it is now well over the roof of the house.  How much of this growth is attributed to the saltwater I don't know,  I  don't believe it has caused any harm at all though and I will continue with it as well as seaweed solution, fish emulsion, sulphate of potash and lots of water, hopefully it'll continue growing at the rate it has been.

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sandgroper
On Mon Sep 10 2018 10:17:26 GMT+0800, GottmitAlex said:

 

Wow! These blokes are using a lot of salt!

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sandgroper
On Mon Sep 10 2018 10:17:26 GMT+0800, GottmitAlex said:

 

They are looking terrific Alex!

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Tracy
1 hour ago, GottmitAlex said:

:greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:

1536788055338-642421206.jpg

Near and dear to my heart.... and there is plenty more where that came from so salt those coconuts!  I'll have to add this to my list of applications for salt now.

20151229-20151229-104A0655.jpg

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GottmitAlex
Just now, Tracy said:

Near and dear to my heart.... and there is plenty more where that came from so salt those coconuts!  I'll have to add this to my list of applications for salt now.

20151229-20151229-104A0655.jpg

vielen Danke!!!

:greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:

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Moose

Report from Chernobyl, Russia: Cadmium is good for Coconuts   :blink:  

Will the Coconut S & M ever end?   :evil:      :crying:

 

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sandgroper
12 hours ago, Moose said:

Report from Chernobyl, Russia: Cadmium is good for Coconuts   :blink:  

Will the Coconut S & M ever end?   :evil:      :crying:

 

If they're growing in Russia it must be!

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GottmitAlex
12 hours ago, Moose said:

Report from Chernobyl, Russia: Cadmium is good for Coconuts   :blink:  

Will the Coconut S & M ever end?   :evil:      :crying:

 

I know, right?

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veeman55
On 9/9/2018, 7:45:35, GottmitAlex said:

salt.pdf

 

 

After reading these comments and links Im sold on the salt diet for coconuts. Makes alot of sense.

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veeman55

How much salt would you all recommend for a coconut in a pot?

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sandgroper

I have one still in a pot, I just pour a bit of seawater over it every couple of weeks. 

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PalmTreeDude

I have heard of people putting salt around the base of their coconuts before and I know that some people do and do not think that it helps, for me personally I do believe that it helps. This summer I added some sea salt around my coconut palm in a pot, and about a week after (it was of course watered a few times after I added the sea salt) it just out of no where started putting on growth very quickly. The tempatures were the same and everything, the only change was the sea salt I added. I do not use it very often though, only a few times during the summer. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude

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PalmTreeDude
3 hours ago, veeman55 said:

How much salt would you all recommend for a coconut in a pot?

If you are going to add salt to a potted coconut, either do what sandgroper said and add a bit of sea water to the base or use just a little bit of normal salt. I only added a bit of sea salt to my coconut palm and it started growing, although I am not 100% sure if it was from the salt or not. I will have to try again next Summer and see what happens. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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sandgroper
On Tue Sep 11 2018 04:39:49 GMT+0800, Rickybobby said:

What a great subject and argument. Last question wether the coconut likes salt or. Not. Does the added salt help keep some bad critters away in the soil?

It probably would help keep bugs away, I use seawater which I collect from the beach myself. I do it because the best coconuts I've seen grow on the beach here in Western Australia, I don't know whether it helps or not but it doesn't cause any grief in my observation. 

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Tyrone

I personally think that NaCl in the soil will kill any root rot fungi present. The salt will just suck the moisture out of the cells of the fungus. 

Just remember that the coconut is a beach dweller by nature. It is an unusual palm in that respect. Most palms would slow down in growth with too much salt in the soil but the coconut is a very notable exception. They grow right down to the high tide mark and in the monsoon season probably have waves crashing over them. You can't use normal horticultural theory with them. They love salt.

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sandgroper

Just salted my coconut palm, if it's good enough for the commercial growers in the Phillipines then it's good enough for me too.

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

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GottmitAlex

That time again. 

Fertilized last month. Salt this month. 

 

 

 

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GottmitAlex

 

 

 

 

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GottmitAlex
On 9/13/2018 at 6:57 AM, Moose said:

Report from Chernobyl, Russia: Cadmium is good for Coconuts   :blink:  

Will the Coconut S & M ever end?   :evil:      :crying:

 

Don't believe me. The coconut palms which are thriving in 32.5 latitude and 12 miles inland thanks to salt are the ones you should look into.

The Philippines GDP is based on Coconuts 

READ MOOSE

 

20190913_132410.jpg

Edited by GottmitAlex

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Rickybobby
2 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Don't believe me. The coconut palms which are thriving in 32.5 latitude and 12 miles inland thanks to salt are the ones you should look into.

The Philippines GDP is based on Coconuts 

READ MOOSE

 

20190913_132410.jpg

You just reminded me I need to fertilize my oldest with some salt. I use softener salt. It dilutes with every watering 

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GottmitAlex
22 minutes ago, Rickybobby said:

You just reminded me I need to fertilize my oldest with some salt. I use softener salt. It dilutes with every watering 

KCL works just fine!

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sandgroper

I use seawater too.

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GottmitAlex
On 9/10/2018 at 1:39 PM, Rickybobby said:

What a great subject and argument. Last question wether the coconut likes salt or. Not. Does the added salt help keep some bad critters away in the soil?

Btw, I don't believe this to be a  argument, but a fact.

Mist of the Phillipenes GDP relies on it. 

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tacobender

Got a bunch of them at shoreline, your saying more salt?

20190922_142443.jpg

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GottmitAlex
10 minutes ago, tacobender said:

Got a bunch of them at shoreline, your saying more salt?

20190922_142443.jpg

Lol no.     They're set!

It only applies to inland Cocos nucifera.

 

Edited by GottmitAlex
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GottmitAlex

Every other month..

20191016_154454.jpgI took this picture after it was watered. 

Hence you see a lot less salt.

Most of it disappears/dissolves upon watering.

Edited by GottmitAlex

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sonoranfans

The phillipines commercial growing method for coconuts for coconut water might be greatly benefitted $$ by the additional sugar production the addition of salt gives.  It could be that, and not the growth rate of biomass that encourages the use of salt.  Coconut water is the top $ product from cocos.   Any time you can adjust sugar in any fruit its going to sell.  None of these cocos look any better than a neighbors (down the street) who uses palm gain only, no salt and almost no soil prep.   In their preferred envronment cocos are easy, one of the easiest.  Perhaps the salt treatment its a sweetener method and perhaps it helps adapt cocos to areas where they normally dont thrive.  Coconuts are among the most salt tolerant palms, they grow on the beach.  Im betting salt is a big deterrent to nematodes and other parasites.  Plants that are highly dependent on Mycorhizal fungi tend not to do well with salinity.   If growth rate increases with salt addition it might be explained by killing bad bugs, but it sure doesnt help nutrition for most plants, it screws up the ratios of major nutrients.  I dont grow cocos, and I'm sure not putting salt on the roots of my palms.  Read the article in the link.

 

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpls.2019.00470/full

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