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Palm crazy

Excellent palm garden in PNW

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Palm crazy
54 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Interesting.. Wonder why this Ginko Var. stays smaller.  

Thought i'd recognized the Rhodo.  Remember seeing these type at the Botanical Garden in Berkeley years ago.. 

Somewhat off topic, anyone up your way ever come across Schefflera macrophylla yet?  Remembering the discussion about it here from some time ago. 

5

S. macrophylla is hardy to 9b and up... However, there is a hardy form that I hear might be for sale in WA in 4-5 years. I've seen pictures of them and they look just like the nonhardy ones.  They will be the holy grail of Schefflera if they are able to do tissue culture. Cutting does not work on this species. Someday they'll be offered on the west coast. 

For people that are not familiar with Schefflera macrophylla, this is what it looks like.  Photos from the net. 

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Edited by Palm crazy
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Chester B

I see a couple of plants that are still on my list for next year.

Is that first Euc a spinning gum (E. perriniana)?  If it is, it's odd it still has it's juvenile foliage, unless they cut it down/back each year.

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Palm crazy
1 hour ago, Chester B said:

I see a couple of plants that are still on my list for next year.

Is that first Euc a spinning gum (E. perriniana)?  If it is, it's odd it still has it's juvenile foliage, unless they cut it down/back each year.

Eucalyptus lacrimans. Some growers use to call this E. pauciflora var. weeping form. Very hardy and not too big so great choice for city gardens. 

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Chester B

Never heard of it before.  Looks interesting but I have no space for any more eucs, I have too many as is.

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Palm crazy
21 hours ago, Palm crazy said:

Eucalyptus lacrimans. Some growers use to call this E. pauciflora var. weeping form. Very hardy and not too big so great choice for city gardens. 

Sorry, Chester, I gave you the name of the second Eucalyptus. Here is the name for the first one. Euc. pulchelta. 

40023994_10214568745985732_9078099788884344832_o.jpg

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Palm crazy
On 9/14/2018, 2:40:33, Chester B said:

I see a couple of plants that are still on my list for next year.

Is that first Euc a spinning gum (E. perriniana)?  If it is, it's odd it still has it's juvenile foliage, unless they cut it down/back each year.

Chester, I got an email from the garden owner and he corrected me with the right name of the Euc you were asking about.  He said, "Euc. up front is Pulverulenta,  always keeps its juvenile leaves."  So now we know. 

 

 

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Chester B

Ok so I have heard of that one, I believe it stays smaller.  They had some for sale at a nursery here but it's more of a 9a plant if I remember correctly so I passed on them.  So thank you for the update.

Right now I have growing in the ground E. pauciflora "niphophila", E. perriniana, E stellulata , E subcrenulata, and E neglecta.  Some I'm grown from seed collected from trees in Olympia, some are unknown provenance.  I've been removing deciduous trees and replacing with these and southern magnolia, madrona, and of course a bunch of palms.  Our house is the highest of the surrounding homes and I have a few neighbors with unsightly backyards so these will provide a year round visual barrier.  So far the real winner is the E. perriniana in its first year it grew from 8" to 6', and since spring it has put on close to 10' and lost its juvenile foliage, simply unbelievable.  It's in a hot spot with poor soil and no supplemental water, and at the time I planted two.  The other one died I think from drought stress but this one is now thriving.

If S. macrophylla is going to be a possibility for us that would be fantastic.  Does it have a lot of indumentum?  Kind of looks like it in that photo.

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Palm crazy

Your garden sounds very green all year and exotic. I had to take all my Euc down 10 years ago because they got too tall and roots were moving my sidewalk. 

Next time your in Olympia let me know and will give you a garden tour, I'm in west Olympia.  Can do a plant trade. 

Looks like the Schefflera does but its non-toxic. 

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Chester B

Thanks Palm crazy i will take you up on that offer if I'm ever that way.

My garden is in its infancy as this has only been its second summer and had a ton of changes/additions since last year.  I'm originally from Ontario, Canada Zone 6B so all of this is new to me.  Palms and tropical like plants are pretty rare there with only a select few taking on the challenge.  Without forums like this and youtube I wouldn't have learned even 10% of what little knowledge I've gleaned from people like yourself.  And by posting pics of your garden as well as your friends it not only helps me to learn more but provides a good deal of inspiration.

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Love them palms
On 9/8/2018, 11:27:16, Palm crazy said:

This garden is not the norm here. This is a very special garden with lots of other exotic and in a great microclimate. Thanks for Looking. :D

I am trying also to pull off a different palm tree set up here in mukilteo wa.insteat of doing the more common Trachycarpus series of palms that people normally have in their yard here ,I am going to go a different way and try Canary date palm,Sylvester palm,mule palm,true date palm and jelly palm.and Mexican fan palm.I have been getting  mixed yays and nays for my list but I got them based on zone 8b and 9a recommendations, any input would be nice

Edited by Love them palms

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Palm crazy

Date palms are not long-term hardy below 9b in PNW.  Mule palms and Jelly palms and Jubaea are a much better choice! Not all 8b climates are the same. Some have heat and sun other like ours are much cooler and wet. Enjoy your heat-loving palms as long as they last. But don't overlook the cool tolerant ones. 

Edited by Palm crazy

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Love them palms
2 hours ago, Palm crazy said:

Date palms are not long-term hardy below 9b in PNW.  Mule palms and Jelly palms and Jubaea are a much better choice! Not all 8b climates are the same. Some have heat and sun other like ours are much cooler and wet. Enjoy your heat-loving palms as long as they last. But don't overlook the cool tolerant ones. 

Thank you for the advice 

I will be looking into the Jubaea chilensis palm as a replacement for the canaries and keep them in pots.most of the online nurseries recommended those palms I listed as perfect for this area.lesson learned I will keep the Sylvester palm in the ground with fingers crossed, it's already been there for 1 winter already 

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