Jump to content
The7thLegend

North Florida Queen Palms, zone 9a expanding

Recommended Posts

Gator

I grew up inland South Georgia....zone 8b.....and when I go back to visit my family...i am shocked at all the queen palms.

It looks very much like the Lake City Fla pictures.

I agree these palms may be on borrowed time.  But seeing multiple mature queen palms in Georgia definitely confirms

that winters are more mild.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jcalvin
5 hours ago, Gator said:

I grew up inland South Georgia....zone 8b.....and when I go back to visit my family...i am shocked at all the queen palms.

It looks very much like the Lake City Fla pictures.

I agree these palms may be on borrowed time.  But seeing multiple mature queen palms in Georgia definitely confirms

that winters are more mild.

I agree. I live in SE Georgia as well. Queens everywhere. The 2018 freak storm came through and killed a few of them, but most of the ones in Brunswick, Saint Simons Island,  Jekyll Island

and even further inland are still there. The coast around Georgia is comparable to Jacksonville. 

 

Here are a few in Waycross that have been there for awhile now. The one on the right didn't survive 2018, but the one on the right is still kicking. 

Screenshot (9).png

Edited by Jcalvin
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The7thLegend

@JcalvinI've seen Queens In Jekyll and Saint Simmons but wow that's an impressive one in Waycross!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Teegurr
On 6/9/2021 at 8:56 PM, The7thLegend said:

 

Of course there's weather anomalies that come once every so many decades or whatever but if palms were planted based on extreme lows there wouldn't be Sabal Palmettos in Lake City (7), W. Robustas in Orlando (18) or Royals in Miami since a low of 30 is zone 9b.  Who's really safe?  

 

But all three of those palms can pretty easily survive those lows.

Is your point that those lows happen on extremely rare occasions so palms that cannot usually survive those temps do because they don't happen every year?

If a robusta was exposed to 18f every year, but no lower, it could survive pretty easily.

A royal wouldn't blink at an annual low of 30.

Sabal palmetto would be the only one that would be a stretch.

Edited by Teegurr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gator

My uncle in Douglas has 3 mature queens like that one in the picture in Waycross.

All 3 made it through the 2018 freeze

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The7thLegend
15 hours ago, Teegurr said:

But all three of those palms can pretty easily survive those lows.

Is your point that those lows happen on extremely rare occasions so palms that cannot usually survive those temps do because they don't happen every year?

If a robusta was exposed to 18f every year, but no lower, it could survive pretty easily.

A royal wouldn't blink at an annual low of 30.

Sabal palmetto would be the only one that would be a stretch.

 

All 3 of those palms/respective cities would be considered Zone pushing ( UF/IFAS ) if you selected palms based on extreme lows because you were worried about the next weather apocalypse.  Yet it's absurd because all 3 of those palms thrive in each of those cities.  Yes eventually a bad weather event will come, nobody is safe and the lows prove it.  In the meantime zones are zones for a reason and a great tool when selecting plants/palms so we'll have Queens in Lake City, Coconut palms in Orlando, Hurricane Palms in Miami, etc.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NBTX11

1985 - Southern Georgia 0F. Lake City Fl 6F

By the way Texas was much warmer (relative to this), with Houston “only” dropping to 20, and San Antonio 19. The coldest air can move east of Texas in freezes. It doesn’t always pour into Texas first.

 

58423EE3-8C35-45A6-8986-1B508ABB62ED.jpeg

Edited by NBTX11
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JLM
4 hours ago, NBTX11 said:

1985 - Southern Georgia 0F. Lake City Fl 6F

By the way Texas was much warmer (relative to this), with Houston “only” dropping to 20, and San Antonio 19. The coldest air can move east of Texas in freezes. It doesn’t always pour into Texas first.

 

58423EE3-8C35-45A6-8986-1B508ABB62ED.jpeg

Will probably be a very long time before we have another extreme freeze like that. Wouldnt be surprised if we dont see a few dips into the teens in northern FL though over the next 10 years. With this La Nina/Cool Neutral ENSO phase we are in right now we are bound to go into an El Nino within the next 5-10 years if not sooner, much sooner. This winter is currently looking like a cool neutral/La Nina winter again though.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The7thLegend
8 hours ago, NBTX11 said:

1985 - Southern Georgia 0F. Lake City Fl 6F

By the way Texas was much warmer (relative to this), with Houston “only” dropping to 20, and San Antonio 19. The coldest air can move east of Texas in freezes. It doesn’t always pour into Texas first.

 

 

 

That's Live Oak FL at 6 degrees, not Lake City.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jcalvin
22 hours ago, Gator said:

My uncle in Douglas has 3 mature queens like that one in the picture in Waycross.

All 3 made it through the 2018 freeze

Here’s another one in Waycross I forgot about. Just happened upon it because my daughter has a soccer tournament here. 

Douglas is a little further inland. I go through quite a bit. 

It’s been here since 2008.It is on the south side of this building near a blacktop surface.  They added the Filibusta’s about 5 years ago. 

7572D1C3-4953-4EB7-8DA7-0F01D91641A7.jpeg

Edited by Jcalvin
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jcalvin
4 hours ago, The7thLegend said:

 

That's Live Oak FL at 6 degrees, not Lake City.

 

Lake City is a little warmer than Live Oak. There’s a ice 9a microclimate on the  west side of the city. 

0A6619B8-7599-4717-BA4E-18EE8D6CB94D.jpeg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NBTX11

Haha, I am not trying to discourage y'all from planting queen palms.  Go for it.  I was just offering a dose of realism.  It's gotten cold there before.  Could happen again.  May never happen again in your lifetime.  Might happen next year.  In the mean time plant away.  As someone who also is in a borderline 8b/9a climate (where I am is on the same latitude as Gainesville), I have seen tons of queen palms come and go.  People are already replanting them from the Feb freeze.  They might be alive for the next 20 years, who knows.  Go for it.  They are so attractive, they are worth the risk.  I am not going to do it, because I don't take a lot of planting chances, but a lot of people do, and are successful.

Edited by NBTX11
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jcalvin
4 hours ago, NBTX11 said:

Haha, I am not trying to discourage y'all from planting queen palms.  Go for it.  I was just offering a dose of realism.  It's gotten cold there before.  Could happen again.  May never happen again in your lifetime.  Might happen next year.  In the mean time plant away.  As someone who also is in a borderline 8b/9a climate (where I am is on the same latitude as Gainesville), I have seen tons of queen palms come and go.  People are already replanting them from the Feb freeze.  They might be alive for the next 20 years, who knows.  Go for it.  They are so attractive, they are worth the risk.  I am not going to do it, because I don't take a lot of planting chances, but a lot of people do, and are successful.

I agree. It might be twenty or thirty years from now, it might be this winter. It’s eventually a matter of time for the queens here. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gator

Bout 15 years ago...i planted about 10 citrus trees. Nice 9a microclimate ( South Ga)  Next to a lake. They did great for a season......

and then we had a "normal winter...with about 2 weeks with lows in the  mid 20's

EVERY STINKIN ONE of those citrus trees croaked.   

I learned.....the freeze doesnt happen every year....but it happens   

Edited by Gator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Laaz

You must have planted the very tender citrus trees. I have about 30 in my yard that I've had for years. I had more, but cut some down because I couldn't use all the fruit.

Edited by Laaz
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jcalvin
8 hours ago, Laaz said:

You must have planted the very tender citrus trees. I have about 30 in my yard that I've had for years. I had more, but cut some down because I couldn't use all the fruit.

Agree. I've lived in SE Georgia pretty much most of my life, and I haven't seen one citrus tree die back. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gator
On 6/14/2021 at 9:25 AM, Laaz said:

You must have planted the very tender citrus trees. I have about 30 in my yard that I've had for years. I had more, but cut some down because I couldn't use all the fruit.

key lime seedlings.

 

They were about 2 foot tall.  I also planted them in the fall ( they were on sale ) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon
1 hour ago, Gator said:

key lime seedlings.

 

They were about 2 foot tall.  I also planted them in the fall ( they were on sale ) 

Key lime is the most tender of all commonly cultivated citrus 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gator
4 hours ago, Xenon said:

Key lime is the most tender of all commonly cultivated citrus 

i thought i was being so smart..... they were on fall clearance for $15 at Lowes

so I bought all 10 and planted them in a row. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Laaz

Nope, if you want a substitute for key lime, get Eustis limequat.. Super hardy & taste almost the same.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      I’ve done a lot of complaining about the slow growth rate of my McCurtain and Brazoria Sabals...Granted, they are slow growers anyway but I think I made them even slower by not watering them enough...unless there was a serious drought, I would let the rain do it for the most part. But this year, I’ve taken to watering them by hand 2-3 times a week, regardless of rain and Of course, they are growing at a much faster rate than before. Sounds really stupid, but I was going on the assumption that they take care of themselves. I won’t drown them or lead them into root rot, but a more proactive watering schedule is going to put my complaining in the rear view mirror...I can see the results already! And, I just laid down my first application of Palm Gain so I think, given how wet it’s been around here these days, I’m going to see real growth in all my palms, but the Sabals for sure.
    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      Last Friday I went to the Ft. Myers palm park by the old railroad museum to collect seeds. I found a plaqued Sabal causiarum loaded with seeds. I know because of the record freeze in TX there is renewed interest in planting Sabal palms because of their cold tolerance. Sabal causiarum is by far the largest of the Sabals as my behemoth specimen on World Famous Sabal Row exemplifies. I was able to pick up seeds at the park but a torrent of rain let loose before I could take photos and I had to sprint for the car. But I have the seeds cleaned and ready to go.
      http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Sabal_causiarum
       
      Sabal causiarum seeds: up to 50 @ $10.00 for the lot
                                                      100 @ $15.00 for the lot
      Shipping = $6.00 in padded envelope             No shipping outside the US. No shipping to HI
      Payment via Paypal
      PM me if you are interested. Tell me how many seeds you wish to purchase and give me your name/address to copy/paste on a mailing label. I will PM back a quote. When you pay, tell me.
      NOTE: Please give me 24 hours to respond. After 24 hours, send me a civil reminder.
      Photos

      My Sabal causiarum (not the mother)

    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      They’re here...they appear to be the right shape and size and they were nice and clean...
      Float test had all but one sink so I guess one floater out of 14 isn’t bad...now the reading starts...any experienced tips welcome!
    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      Anyone know a grower who sells Butia capitata var. bonnetti? I really want to try a pinnate and this one appears to be a reasonable candidate.
    • Laaz
      By Laaz
      I have had two of these in the ground for over 15 years now. I have never seen a flower in all these years. How long will they take to flower? They have gotten quite large & I'm about ready to dig them up & sell them as they really aren't very appealing to me...
×
×
  • Create New...