Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Estlander

Any chance of survival for my Trachycarpus Fortunei?

Recommended Posts

Estlander

Planted this Trachy in January this year. Otherwise looks good, but lately the spears have heen turning brown. The growing point smells very musty as well. No spear pulls yet. They’re still tightly in there.

I hand water it (no sprinklers) and never get the growing point wet with tap water. 

About a month ago, when i first saw dried out spots on an emerging spear, I sprayed it with copper fungicide, but looking at it yesterday it has gotten worse with two newest emerging spears looking pretty bad.

I soaked the growing point with copper fungicide yesterday. 

Considering that this is FL zone 9A with plenty of rain, heat and humid weather still left until cooler weather that these things prefer, do you think this is something that it can grow out of or should i just replace it with something else?

I’m thinking a single trunk Chamaerops Humilis due to a limited space in that spot.

In this spot it also gets a few hours of daytime sun, which may complicate things a bit too.

I wish i had known how difficult these things are to grow and get them to look beautiful in FL before I bought it :(

 

3F054D19-59C5-40FE-9F85-A369BAF722AE.jpeg

FED900AC-5688-4FA1-8790-856C25F57044.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

Sounds like you diagnosed the root cause and the potential solution correctly from what the pictures show, but it may take a while for it to recover (if it recovers).  Someone else with more experience treating fungal infections would have to weigh in on this, but any harm in spraying it more than once?

If it doesn't make it, chamaerops would be a solid choice.  Similar look (I think they are distantly related), cold hardy, and handle nematodes much better.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Estlander

I’m leaning towards this palm not making it myself. In a more favorable climate to them it would probably recover. But here they have so many factors working against them. 

If anyone has, in a similar climate or somewhat similar climate, had similar damage to their Trachycarpus palms, I’d love to hear the outcome. 

Edited by Estlander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mdsonofthesouth

Could try peroxide and some sea kelp/weed on the roots to try and give it a boost. This worked on my chamaerops humils var cerifera that was nearly killed by potting soil. Not saying its a guarantee but worth a try!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Definitely try hydrogen peroxide in that area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Laaz

Cut the brown rot off & drench it with hydrogen peroxide. We are just about as hot & humid as you are & they grow like weeds here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Estlander

Thanks guys. Poured peroxide in there as well. I guess I'll leave it alone for a bit, even though I'm kinda itching to plant something else in it's spot, lol.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rickybobby

So what is the scientific issue with Trachycarpus is Florida? There’s been a lot of different theories 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr
2 hours ago, Rickybobby said:

So what is the scientific issue with Trachycarpus is Florida? There’s been a lot of different theories 

The most likely problem is nematodes.  There has been some debate about heat, humidity, and direct sunlight, but they have that in Central Texas and some places inland in S. Cal. too.  They grow fine there.  We had a conversation about this after I found a few decent ones in Lakeland:

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/56607-trachycarpus-in-lakeland/

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • tim_brissy_13
      By tim_brissy_13
      Hi all,
      I’m hoping someone can help with the ID of this Trachycarpus. It was amongst a group of T fortunei at a non palm specialist nursery but clearly different. Compared to the others, it is much more squat and thick in stature, has thick leathery leaflets, wider leaflets and a glaceous white/blue underside of leaflets which is from a wax that can be wiped off. Petioles are rough but not clearly armed. The leaflets also seem to be arranged split in pairs which matches T geminisectus, so I bought it but surely to get a geminisectus from a group of fortunei is too good to be true. Any ideas? I haven’t seen young T latisectus but from what I’ve read that could also fit? Or is it just an extreme variation of fortunei?




    • limoncik
      By limoncik
      Interesting trachycarpus. Is this some form or ordinary T. fortunei? Photo taken in Yalta, Crimea.

    • SilverDragon
      By SilverDragon
      Hello all,
      I found a gorgeous little baby at a specialty greenhouse near me. Should I transplant since her little roots are poking through?


    • LasPalmerasDeMaryland
      By LasPalmerasDeMaryland
      Well with frosts and freezes finally in the forecast, it’s time to mulch and wrap these palms up. But before I do, a little update on their growth this year. 
×
×
  • Create New...