Jump to content
Sabal_Louisiana

95 potential Palm species that could be grown on the northern Gulf Coast of the US

Recommended Posts

Sabal_Louisiana

Once, I made a list of as many species of palms (among other subtropicals)  that could possibly be grown on the northern Gulf Coast of the US, the area that I live in, with the idea of experimentation.

I may have missed a few so this list could maybe hit the 100 mark.

Many of these are probably borderline for the region (esp the zone 9 stuff) but could make it in sheltered locations / warmest areas of the region between coastal/SE Texas and the Fla. panhandle. Also, some are rather obscure or difficult to obtain. Some may not be desirable to grow anyway. Even so, I've always thought that some species are underutilized and would probably do well around here. There are only around a dozen on this list that you see planted on a familiar basis.

Below is the common name/scientific name and lowest recommended cold hardiness zone.

Of course, I welcome any comments/suggestions that y'all may have regarding this survey.

Needle Palm Rhapidophyllum histrix 6A
     
Dwarf Palmetto Sabal minor 6B
     
Chinese Windmill Palm, Chusan Palm Trachycarpus fortunei 7A
     
Yunnan Dwarf Palm Trachycarpus nanus 7B
     
Powder Palm Brahea moorei 8A
Pindo Palm Butia capitata 8A
Jelly Palm Butia odorata 8A
Dwarf Yatay Palm Butia paraguayensis 8A
Yatay Palm Butia yatay 8A
Mazari Palm Nannorrhops ritchiana 8A
Canary Island Date Palm Phoenix canariensis 8A
Scrub Palmetto Sabal etonia 8A
Texas Palmetto Sabal mexicana 8A
Cabbage Palmetto, Sabal Palmetto Sabal Palmetto 8A
Saw Palmetto Serenoa repens 8A
Khasia Hills Fan Palm Trachycarpus martianus 8A
Mountain Fan Palm Trachycarpus oreophilus 8A
Stone Gate Palm Trachycarpus princeps 8A
Kumaon Palm Trachycarpus takil 8A
Blue Needle Palm Trithrinax campestris 8A
California Fan Palm Washingtonia filifera 8A
     
Seashore Palm Allagoptera arenaria 8B
Dwarf Palm Allagoptera campestris 8B
Sinaloa hesper palm Brahea aculeata 8B
Blue hesper palm, Mexican blue palm Brahea armata 8B
Mexican Dwarf Blue Palm, Sierre Madre Palm Brahea decumbensis 8B
European fan palm Chamaerops humulis 8B
Guilin dwarf palm Guihaia argyrata 8B
Chilean wine palm Jubaea chilensis 8B
Mataranka Palm Livistonia rigida 8B
Dwarf Date Palm Phoenix acaulis 8B
True Date Palm Phoenix dactylifera 8B
Mountain Date Palm Phoenix loureiroi 8B
Slender Lady Palm Rhapsis humilis 8B
Bermuda Palmetto Sabal bermudana 8B
Puerto Rican Hat Palm Sabal causiarium 8B
Hat Palm, Hispaniola Palmetto Sabal domingensis 8B
Llanos Palmetto, Savannah Palmetto Sabal rosei 8B
Sonora Palmetto Sabal uresana 8B
Fox Palm Syagrus harleyi 8B
Brazilian Needle Palm, Spiny fiber palm Trithrinax brasiliensis 8B
Mexican Fan Palm Washingtonia robusta 8B
     
Gru-Gru Palm Acrocomia totai 9A
Dwarf Sugar Palm, Formosa Palm Arenga engleri 9A
Tibetan Sugar Palm Arenga micrantha 9A
Bismarck Palm Bismarckia nobilis 9A
San Jose hesper palm Brahea brandegeei 9A
Blue Rock Palm, Sombrero Palm Brahea dulcis 9A
Guadalupe Palm Brahea edulis 9A
Dwarf Jelly Palm Butia archeri 9A
Chinese fishtail palm Caryota ochlandra 9A
Hardy bamboo palm Chamaedorea microspadix 9A
Radicalis Palm Chamaedorea radicalis 9A
Caranday Palm Copernicia alba 9A
Carnauba wax palm Copernicia prunifera 9A
Australian cabbage fan palm Livistonia australis 9A
Bentham's fountain palm Livistonia benthamii 9A
Chinese fan palm Livistonia chinensis 9A
Ribbon fan palm Livistonia decora 9A
Blackdown Tablelands Palm Livistonia fulva 9A
Carnarvon Gorge Cabbage Palm Livistonia nitida 9A
Sugar Date Palm, Toddy Palm Phoenix sylvestris 9A
Lady Palm Rhapsis excelsia 9A
Bitter Palm Syagrus comosa 9A
Queen Palm Syagrus romanzoffiana 9A
Carandilla Trithrinax schizophylla 9A
     
Paurotis Acoelorrhaphae wrightii 9B
Coyal Palm, Macaw Palm Acrocomia aculeata 9B
Bangalow Palm, Piccabeen Palm Archontophoenix cunninghamiana 9B
Myola King Palm Archontophoenix myolensis 9B
Sugar Palm Arenga pinnata 9B
Cohune Palm Attalea cohune 9B
Peach Palm Bactris gasipaes 9B
Palmyra Palm Borassus aethiopium 9B
Cataract Palm Chamaedorea cataractum 9B
Hainan fan palm Chuniophoenix hainanensis 9B
Silver thatch palm Coccothrinax argentata 9B
Old man thatch palm Coccothrinax crinata 9B
Manambe Palm Dypsis decipens 9B
Maya Palm Gaussia maya 9B
Lala palm Hyphaene coriacea 9B
Egyptian doum palm, Gingerbread palm Hyphaene thebaica 9B
White backed palm Kerriodoxa elegans 9B
Vietnamese Paradise Palm Lanonia dasyantha 9B
Key thatch palm Leucothrinax morrisii 9B
Himalayan Fan Palm, Major Jenkins Palm Livistonia jenkinsiana 9B
Senegal Date Palm Phoenix reclinata 9B
Pygmy Date Palm Phoenix roebelenii 9B
Monimony Palm Ravanea robustior 9B
Finger Palm Rhapsis multifida 9B
Bay Palmetto Sabal mauritiiformis 9B
Thatch Palmetto Sabal yapa 9B
Ballang, Telsis Saribus merrillii 9B
Florida thatch palm Thrinax radiata 9B
Wallich Palm Wallichia caryotoides 9B
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Interesting list. Kudos to you for all the hard work. My first thought is that unless a person has an amazingly warm microclimate or lives right on the Gulf, many of those 9b palms will be tough grows or have short term survival rates. If my memory is correct, a bad winter (like the last) on the northern Gulf Coast sees lows sometimes fall into mid- to upper-teens, which will wipe out many or most 9b palms. And some 9a palms (i.e.,  Syagrus romanzoffiana) could face the same problems. The north Gulf Coast is wide open to arctic fronts that plunge south as far as south TX and even SFL.

All that said, your list offers a number of possible palm choices beyond the "usual suspects." I would also point out that under the category "Sabal minor", there are a number of geographical variations of this species, as well size variations in a subcategory I call "uber dwarfs" that grow true from seeds.

Good topic for discussion.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm crazy

That is a great list... I would also add...Butia catarinensis. A great little butia that is amazingly hardy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr.SamuraiSword

doubt filfera and the wine palm would do well due to the humidity they hate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr
4 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

doubt filfera and the wine palm would do well due to the humidity they hate

Probably can toss Nannarhops as well. I've only seen one of them down here and they are from a desert area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Manalto

This list and discussion is of great interest to me here on the north Gulf Coast - thank you. I wonder too about high rainfall and humidity. Did you want to include the mule palm, or is including hybrids opening too big a can of worms?

As a newbie, I'm familiar with the common palms but would be interested to learn which species you consider underutilized.

Spelling correction: Rhapis

Edited by Manalto
clarity

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cikas

Trachycarpus martianus is USDA 9b palm, not 8a. That list is off by at least half of the zone for many palms. Martianus is just one example. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg
3 hours ago, Palm crazy said:

That is a great list... I would also add...Butia catarinensis. A great little butia that is amazingly hardy. 

Also, Butia purpurascens, which is spineless. Hard to find like B. archeri, which I would also like to have. Mine is a pale mint green, appears delicate but always looks flawless even through a hurricane.

Livistona mariae is supposedly hardier than L. rigida.

I don't see Kentiopsis oliviformis on the list. I've read it is hardy in zone 9b, maybe warmer parts of 9a.

I agree Jubaea would not like humid Gulf Coast summers. I also question the in inclusion of many of the Braheas. This is a genus of dry heat palms that generally hate hot, humid, rainy SE US summers. When specifying possible coldhardy palms for a geographical area, you have to look beyond mere zone specs to take into account humidity and temp ranges that affect palm survival.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TexasColdHardyPalms

Jubaea and nannorhorps do just fine in Houston and north Louisiana, which are arguably the most hot and humid areas in the lower 48.  Armata will struggle with the humidity. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fusca
5 hours ago, PalmatierMeg said:

I also question the in inclusion of many of the Braheas. This is a genus of dry heat palms that generally hate hot, humid, rainy SE US summers. When specifying possible coldhardy palms for a geographical area, you have to look beyond mere zone specs to take into account humidity and temp ranges that affect palm survival.

I agree with you Meg, but wouldn't Brahea clara do well?  I was going to suggest it for the list instead of many of the other Braheas.  From what I understand from @sonoranfans it grew very well in zone 9b Florida and pretty fast as well.  I recently planted one myself and I believe it is hardy to my zone 9a and possibly warmer parts of 8b, but not sure about that.

Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TexasColdHardyPalms

NOT ON LIST

Brahea Berlandieri 8A

Trachycarpus Latisectus is a 9A palm.

Medemia Argun is a 9B Palm same as the Hyphaene's. 

Lytocaryum Hoehnei is a 9A/9B

Phoenix theophrastii is 8B/9A

Butia Microspadix is 8B

Butia Eriospatha is or close to the most cold hardy Butia @ 8A.

 

Brahea overview

Clara seems to be just as hardy as Brandegeei in Texas, which will burn about the same temperature as W. Robusta.  We had a large trunking one that we sold to a guy in Dallas 8B that was only partly burned this year and have several 10-15G plants planted around the nursery. Of all the Brahea's we grow Armata detests humidity and overhead watering FAR more than any other species. 

B. Aculeata is 8b/9A Humidty/overhead watering just fine

Nitida is 9B -Humidty/overhead watering just fine

Edulis is 8b/9a Humidty/overhead watering just fine

Elegans - still testing Humidty/overhead watering just fine

Dulcis is an 8B/9A Humidty/overhead watering just fine

Super silver is 8A Humidty/overhead watering just fine

The silver variety of berlandieri is a 8A.  Humidty/overhead watering just fine.  The one I had held up as good as armata until it was damaged by a rogue lawn mower last summer which eventually killed it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg
3 hours ago, Fusca said:

I agree with you Meg, but wouldn't Brahea clara do well?  I was going to suggest it for the list instead of many of the other Braheas.  From what I understand from @sonoranfans it grew very well in zone 9b Florida and pretty fast as well.  I recently planted one myself and I believe it is hardy to my zone 9a and possibly warmer parts of 8b, but not sure about that.

Jon

B. clara may do well in 9b but I am 10a/10b and that may be the difference. Years ago I was told Brahea decumbens had the best chance of surviving my climate so I tried one. It limped along for a couple years but eventually carked. You may want to add this Brahea to your list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sabal_Louisiana

Hi all. Thanks so very much for responding to my post. I have a few comments to add.

I am by no means a palm expert and thats why I produced this list - so I can learn.

My main source of reference was the excellent "Encyclopedia of Cultivated Palms" but I also consulted a couple of other books and various websites.

As I said, alot of these on the list would really be pushing the limits on cold tolerance etc for this region so yea a cautious planter regardless of where they live along the coast would consider risky/take great care of most of those in say recommended zone 9b but we do get occasional surprises where plants that arent supposed to make it do. It is unfortunate that this region has such volatility in regards to winter cold and thats the biggest challenge. A big arctic outbreak could be devastating anywhere.

I think what would qualify as zone 9B is quite limited but would include Galveston, downtown Houston up to about Sabine Pass/Cameron La. It would also include SE LA  towns close to the coast such as Morgan City, Golden Meadow, Grand Isle and most of Plaquemines Parish and possibly New Orleans. Miss. Gulf Coast would be questionable but in AL Dauphin Island and maybe Gulf Shores could qualify. On the Fla panhandle, it would be confined to barrier islands inc. Destin and certainly down around Port St Joe and Apalachicola. The least likely areas to freeze would be around Galveston Bay, the true delta of the Miss R (Boothville has not dropped below mid 20s since 1989) and Cape San Blas/St George Is, Fl. Inland coastal communities like Beaumont, Lake Charles, Pensacola would qualify as 9A with a slight tendency towards less hard freezes eastward. Interstate 10 is the approximate dividing line b/w 8b and 9a. Folks as far north as Shreveport, maybe Jackson,MS, Montgomery AL, Columbus and Macon GA would still be in Zone 8.

I will gladly look at some of those species names I missed and re-evaluate others on the list. I know that cold tolerance is only part of the equation for success.

I have seen some filifera growing around here but maybe they were hybrids with robusta? I'll post some pics perhaps. I know that Chilean wine palm is said not to do well in humid climates - I wouldnt attempt it but I wonder if anyone has tried them in the SE US. Regarding Nannorrhops_ritchiana, I know it is a desert palm but according to  palmpedia.net it does "very well in warm, humid, high rainfall climates"..Go figure. Manalto, thanks for the name correction (these Latin names can be confusing). I'm wondering why I put T. martianus in zone 8. Like you say, I should move it down. Perhaps some other trachys too.

Thanks again for the replies, guys.

 

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TexasColdHardyPalms

Ill say it again Jubaea has have zero issue with heat and humidity.  They must have well draining soil and a shallow water table or low drainage area will result in death.  As far as florida goes I am pretty the nematodes are what eventually kills them just like trachycarpus.  I have several customers kept potted jubaea and trachycarpus for years near cape Canaveral over to tampa and up to panama city. Both species did great while in pots and then declined and die within a few years after put in the ground. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sonoranfans

Yes I purchased a "icy blue" brahea clara from tejas tropicals in 2011 as a strap leaf seedling in a 4" pot.  I put it in the ground in full sun after it became root bound in a 3 gallon container about a year later.  today its about 10' overall growing out of the overhead(lawn) sprinkler range, which used to lead to some mold spotting on lower leaves.   The palm was hammered in IRMA, as it was very exposed.   It lost most of the leaves on the windward side, just shredded them.  Its doing fine though, putting out spears again, nice color, really blue/green, not "icy blue".  It might be better off if I had planted it in a dry area, out of sprinkler range and the drainage path(low spot), but I had few really sunny spots left.  These palms don't like wet roots in winter, period.  But compared to B. armatas and dulcis(Ive killed every one of 4 tried), they are far better growers in the florida humidity.  Now I'm just waiting for the IRMA haircut to grow back.  But it is  a low to no maintenance palm for me. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fusca
2 hours ago, sonoranfans said:

Yes I purchased a "icy blue" brahea clara from tejas tropicals in 2011 as a strap leaf seedling in a 4" pot.  I put it in the ground in full sun after it became root bound in a 3 gallon container about a year later.  today its about 10' overall growing out of the overhead(lawn) sprinkler range, which used to lead to some mold spotting on lower leaves.   The palm was hammered in IRMA, as it was very exposed.   It lost most of the leaves on the windward side, just shredded them.  Its doing fine though, putting out spears again, nice color, really blue/green, not "icy blue".  It might be better off if I had planted it in a dry area, out of sprinkler range and the drainage path(low spot), but I had few really sunny spots left.  These palms don't like wet roots in winter, period.  But compared to B. armatas and dulcis(Ive killed every one of 4 tried), they are far better growers in the florida humidity.  Now I'm just waiting for the IRMA haircut to grow back.  But it is  a low to no maintenance palm for me. 

Hope your clara grows back well and you don't experience another storm like that.  That's great info - I didn't find much info online.  Mine is also the "icy blue" variety and in full sun.  It's a nicely grown 3-gallon size palm I got from Joseph @TexasColdHardyPalms Hopefully mine will keep its color in the sun.  I think the blue/silver color in palms tend to be heightened in more desert conditions.  And you've got experience in that environment as well!  @Sabal_Louisiana, I would recommend this one for you - I think it would do well in the Red Stick.

Jon

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Matthew92

I have always thought that Washingtonia filifera can't grow that well in the Southeast U.S. due to humidity. A success story here and there, but nothing like ones out west. But just recently, I came across a find that seems to prove that they can do just fine maybe given a proper well draining site. Saw the grove of W. filifera at the Montgomery Botanical Center in Miami, FL. I was told by staff that these came from seed collected directly from native stands in habitat in the Western U.S. I would think that the reason their trunks are not as fat as ones in arid areas is that here they don't need as much water to store in the trunk in this climate.

IMG_1945.thumb.JPG.cc118c9c870d9f8eb0605

IMG_1967.thumb.JPG.cbb8d4e0aa9f3c6a56739

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Umbrae

I wouldnt bet the farm on acrocomia 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sandy Loam

I might actually keep accocomia totai on the list if you get seed from the Dade City, Florida and Lake City, Florida experiments (both places are unusually cold in winter, especially Lake City which can rival any Gulf Coast town for extreme winter cold).  However, I would strike the following from your list as simply too cold-sensitive for long-term viability:  thrinax, cocothrinax, attalea and archontopheonix.

Based on my own garden's experience, I would keep arenga micrantha on the list because it will grow new fronds back, even after an exceptionally cold winter.  It will look terrible in those bad winters (while Arenga Engleri will look great), but it will survive.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

Definitely agree with @Sandy Loam on Dade City winter weather and tossing out archontophoenix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Nannorohps (arabica) from Joseph TexasColdhardyPalms .... pic is about a year old .... its hanging in pretty good. I'm in a cold 9a .... it saw 20 last year briefly uncovered.....some burn but came back strong

20180501_184438.jpg

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Actually pic was from after the 20degree winter.....I trimmed of the dead leaves

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GaDawg

 "Interstate 10 is the approximate dividing line b/w 8b and 9a. Folks as far north as Shreveport, maybe Jackson,MS, Montgomery AL, Columbus and Macon GA would still be in Zone 8..."

Until you reach Maclenny, Fl. At that point it turns into a 9a. I would say, if you drew a line along 301, starting at MacClenny, and followed it until it turned to 84 and then toward Savannah, Ga. and Hilton Head, SC , you're hugging 9a/8b border.

Edited by GaDawg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Some more 9a pics

Brahea clara

 

20181219_085002_001.jpg

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Dypsis decipiens barely grows but doesn't die. It's planted on the root ball of the big S. causiarum

20181219_084502.jpg

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sandy Loam

AliceHunter2000, did you plant your dypsis decipiens in full sun?  Mine did not grow a single mm before it died, after spending about six or seven years in the ground.  However, it was planted in deep shade on a rocky mound to keep it cool and well-drained.  I wish I had tried it in full sun to maximize growth speed. 

 

I will be amazed if anyone ever produces a large, trunking Dypsis Decipiens in Florida.  Mine was impervious to cold, but it was just weird.  It kept trying to stand up on its tip-toes (it wanted to grow upwards above the soil line with its roots exposed).  It wasn't terribly happy in shade either, although it may have melted in our sun if I had planted it there.  It simply isn't a tree for a humid and rainy climate. 

 

Dypsis Decipiens seem to grow at ten times the speed in California, although I am referring to the palm photos posted in semi-coastal (not desert inland) locations on PalmTalk.

I hope yours survives up there in the Panhandle.  When you're 1,000 years old, maybe you'll have some trunking photos to post on PalmTalk.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swolte

Great list, and thanks for sharing!! I have been working on one of my own for the past few months that also adds some additional information. I know it's a lot of puzzling! I may share mine later (though I only focused on palms up to zone 8b). Some of the Sabal, like Birmingham and Brazoria, may be good additions to the list! 
:) 

Edited by Swolte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon

Galveston is a solid 9b, borderline 10a. Low there did not drop below 30F from 1997-2009. Probably only Grand Isle/extreme southeastern LA can rival it. Last winter was a landscape changing freeze (25F), the streets are now full of dead (though a few seem to be regenerating) "Norfolk Island Pines" (Araucaria columnaris) that had been there since the early 2000s. A few royals and foxtails managed to squeak by. Lots of nice Bismarckia. It looks a lot less tropical now, but people were pulling some crazy zone pushes back in the 2000s. Mature Carpentaria, Satakentia, Dypsis lutescens etc. 

Houston (especially the core and south of I-10) and New Orleans are probably milder than even the warmest micro-climates in AL/MS/FL Panhandle. There are many old queen palms and pygmy dates. 

There are a lot of mature Washingtonia filifera in Galveston. Pretty sure it is even more steamy than S. Florida in the summer. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Yes...that is where the division lay....can you grow regular queens and roebelinis....there are very few survivors of either in my area. But some other things seem to squeak by. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

C. cateractum gets protected every year

20181222_163818.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

I grew this P. Sylvestris from seed ... it's really starting to turn into something nice. I purchased the mother of this tree from Albert Livingston Palms in Homestead Florida more than 15 years ago...this palm is probably 10 years old.

20181222_163709.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Here is a L. decora ....it's grown quite a bit from Fishbranch Tree Farm .... one thing I've learned about ribbons is that they never seem to get enough water. I imagine these palms would grow super lush planted next to a lake or pond where it has an unlimited water supply.

20181222_163441.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmTreeDude
3 minutes ago, Alicehunter2000 said:

Here is a L. decora ....it's grown quite a bit from Fishbranch Tree Farm .... one thing I've learned about ribbons is that they never seem to get enough water. I imagine these palms would grow super lush planted next to a lake or pond where it has an unlimited water supply.

20181222_163441.jpg

I remeber seeing these on Hilton Head Island thinking, "What is up with these palmettos?" A few years ago. I like the look of them though! 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
Added Text

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Was unsure of A. engleri for my area ....but this one I've grown from seed has been slow but reliable. 

20181222_163456.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr
Just now, Alicehunter2000 said:

Was unsure of A. engleri for my area ....but this one I've grown from seed has been slow but reliable.

Very nice!  I have a pile of seeds (literally) here.  Any words of advice on germination protocol?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Yes PalmTreeDude .... I really need an irrigation system ....a lot of my stuff would look better and grow faster with consistent water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000
1 minute ago, kinzyjr said:

Very nice!  I have a pile of seeds (literally) here.  Any words of advice on germination protocol?

I just used the baggie method on the water heater method. They sprouted pretty easy

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×