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sandgroper

A walk around UWA

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sandgroper

Today, with my Wife and Daughter, I went to the University of Western Australia, they had an open day with lots of fun activities for kids and adults alike. I decided to take some photos of the gardens, although we are still in winter here and the plants are not looking their best they are still quite lovely and provide a pleasant place for a quiet wander. Hope you like the pics,

cheers, Dave.

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sandgroper

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greysrigging

Very tropical looking.... but you can't fool all of us.... Perth area is a sandy desert wasteland to those of us from up North..... lol

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sandgroper

Plenty of palms like these growing in Perth, not too bad for a desert wasteland! Lol

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Tyrone
3 hours ago, greysrigging said:

Very tropical looking.... but you can't fool all of us.... Perth area is a sandy desert wasteland to those of us from up North..... lol

Plenty of sandy desert up north. In fact the Great Sandy Desert is exactly that.

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Tyrone
3 hours ago, sandgroper said:

Today, with my Wife and Daughter, I went to the University of Western Australia, they had an open day with lots of fun activities for kids and adults alike. I decided to take some photos of the gardens, although we are still in winter here and the plants are not looking their best they are still quite lovely and provide a pleasant place for a quiet wander. Hope you like the pics,

cheers, Dave.

image.jpeg

I always wanted to check out the Howeas from UWA when I used to live up there, but never got around too it. They're old plants.

Some facts. Howeas love sandy soil especially with a bit of limestone in it. The Perth coastal strip is exactly that. LHI is the same latitude as Perth also. Perth coastline winters aren't much different to LHI winters either. There are heaps of good looking Howeas on the west coast from about Perth down right to the south coast around Albany. Inland areas around Perth are too hot for Howeas in full sun in summer though. They tend to burn. LHI never ever hits 30C yet Perth averages 32C in January and February. Perth summers are generally low in humidity whereas  LHI has year round humidity especially in summer. With added humus and irrigation in the warm season a Howea can be very happy in Perth.

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