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    • kinzyjr
      By kinzyjr
      The 2019 Holiday meet-up started at Heathcote Botanical Gardens in Ft. Pierce, Florida.  The gardens are roughly 5 acres and have a densely planted palm and cycad walk as well as a reflection garden full of Bonsai plants.  Our tour guide for the day was none other than @Dave-Vero.  Currently, the gardens are set up with Christmas lights and a train set under a tree as part of their Garden of Lights event.  For more information on the gardens, please visit: https://www.heathcotebotanicalgardens.org/
      On with the show:
      Next 3 photos: The parking lot has pretty standard views for coastal central Florida; with Livistona and Roystonea in fruit, and some yuccas to stop you from parking in the mulch.



      Next 4 photos: The entrance has some more old favorites.  From there you can see some of the canopy palms in the gardens.




      Once inside, a Satakentia liukiuensis all decked out with lights.

      A look down the path shows that all of the palms are under canopy for protection.  A Dypsis decaryi is present on the right fork.

      There are bromeliads and other plants mixed in with the palms as you would expect.  What's that on the left?

      Next 2 photos: If you guessed Howea forsteriana, you are correct.  This palm seemed to attract most of the attention at the start of the tour.  There is a close-up in the second photo.


      The famed 3-headed Sabal makes an appearance in an open spot off the main path.

    • Pal Meir
      By Pal Meir
      According to the palm literature Lytocaryum weddellianum grows at altitudes between 50 and 800 m and Lytocaryum insigne from 1000 to 1800 m (Noblick 2017). But those limitations seem to be not correct. Below four habitat photos showing L insigne at c. 500 m and L weddellianum at c. 900 m (and 1200 m imo):



      This palm is imo also L weddellianum, but I am not sure:

    • Pal Meir
      By Pal Meir
      Not a Lodoicea, but only two L weddellianum potted together, today 6 years old:

      And 2 years ago:

      And when they were still younger:

      And 4 months after birth, er, germination:

       
    • Pal Meir
      By Pal Meir
      Trachycarpus wagnerianus seems to be another ideal bonsai palm.
      Here an 8 years old palm which got transplanted into ground in 2014:

       
      And onother one 12 years old in a Ø12cm x H10cm plastic pot:

       
      The latest leaf of that now 16 years old palm:

       
    • Pal Meir
      By Pal Meir
      This is the story of the weakest of ten Lytocaryum weddellianum seedlings.
      In 2013 all other seeds germinated between April 01 and 26, only one small seed germinated much later on May 8 after 49 days (cf. pic #1).  And this seedling N°1308 would not grow like its siblings and stayed small though it was the only single seedling which was planted since the beginning in a large Ø12xH12 cm clay pot (cf. pic #2).  (The other five singles N°1301 to N°1305 had only tiny Ø8xH9cm clay pots.) So I checked the roots and was very worried (pic #3).  The soil mix could not be the the reason because the other Lyto weddells were planted in the same mix.  So I guessed it might be that the draining hole of the pot was closed by something too tight. I placed another piece of a clay pot over the hole and repotted the palm with the same soil into the same pot.  And it became looking happier (pic #4)  and is a happy little bonsai palm until now, pushing its 18th leaf (pic #5), with very strong and healthy roots (pic #6). 
      So we can see that even an ideal soil mix may cause problems when the pot is too large or the drainage not optimal.
      #1

      #2

      #3

      #4

      #5

      #6

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