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Moose

It's On

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Moose

Last cool morning for "cool season". Mild winter for South Florida. Ongoing drought by South Florida standards. Heat, oppressive humidity and tropical conditions in store until the end of October. At least the palms will love it. Happy growing.

 

:D

Edited by Moose
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Missi

If the plants are happy, the plant parents are happy! ^_^

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Moose
2 hours ago, Missi said:

If the plants are happy, the plant parents are happy! ^_^

As long as I can sleep in my AC at night.  :asleep:

Otherwise the Moose gets very Cranky with high humidity and 90 F type climate.  :evil:

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mdsonofthesouth

I love heat and humidity! But I must ask if you dont then why live there?

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Moose
On ‎4‎/‎29‎/‎2018‎ ‎8‎:‎47‎:‎31‎, mdsonofthesouth said:

I love heat and humidity! But I must ask if you dont then why live there?

I've been in Miami since 1965. We didn't get A/C until 1968, central air was a big ticket luxury item then. Now I am older elevator guy. Working in Elevator machine rooms is hot work. The newer machine rooms have air conditioning. But I work on lots of older equipment.. Especially downtown and Miami Beach. My palms still favor the humidity.

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mdsonofthesouth
7 hours ago, Moose said:

I've been in Miami since 1965. We didn't get A/C until 1968, central air was a big ticket luxury item then. Now I am older elevator guy. Working in Elevator machine rooms is hot work. The newer machine rooms have air conditioning. But I work on lots of older equipment.. Especially downtown and Miami Beach. My palms still favor the humidity.

Ahh just wondering. Almost went to Miami for school with Lynn University as a backup many years ago but my father screwed me out of that, but I digress. Well I am definitely jealous of your climate!

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GottmitAlex

It's on for all Socal as well.

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Missi
On 4/26/2018, 3:39:08, Moose said:

As long as I can sleep in my AC at night.  :asleep:

Otherwise the Moose gets very Cranky with high humidity and 90 F type climate.  :evil:

Same with Missi! :greenthumb::innocent: She will wilt. :bemused:

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Palmsbro
On 4/26/2018, 3:39:08, Moose said:

As long as I can sleep in my AC at night.  :asleep:

Otherwise the Moose gets very Cranky with high humidity and 90 F type climate.  :evil:

The humidity doesn't bother me...

But the HEAT definitely does...

So on goes the AC!

On 4/26/2018, 5:34:52, Moose said:

Last cool morning for "cool season". Mild winter for South Florida. Ongoing drought by South Florida standards. Heat, oppressive humidity and tropical conditions in store until the end of October. At least the palms will love it. Happy growing.

 

:D

Highs solidly in the late 80s F/90s F (30C to 37C/38C) from mid-May to September...

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kinzyjr

My preference is to have heat and humidity over cold and wind.  I'll take the rapid growth brought on by long, hot days and tropical showers while they're here, and then enjoy some sweater weather in late fall, winter, and early spring.  :)

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Moose

Lots of rain kept temperatures down. Seems we are out of the drought now, we are on the plus of average precipitation for this time of the year. Plants look happy.

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Moose

Got a chance between rain showers today to grab 50 mangoes off the tree.

Mango season is on. :wub:

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mdsonofthesouth
49 minutes ago, Moose said:

Got a chance between rain showers today to grab 50 mangoes off the tree.

Mango season is on. :wub:

 

I heard mangos are related to poison ivy, how easy is it to get the toxin while tending and gathering? All that aside LOVE mangos!

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Moose

Some people are highly allergic to sap from the tree or sap where stem meets the fruit. Others it's a mild irritant. It does not affect me, like most of the population.

If you are highly allergic, you can't peel the mangoes or even touch the skin.

Whatever the toxin is that affects people, I don't believe it gets into the fruit under the skin. Have a fellow Palm Talker who is highly allergic, breaks out with severe rash when contacts even the skin of the fruit, but has no problem eating the fruit. The smallest piece of skin left on any of the fruit does give him a reaction.

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mdsonofthesouth

Ahh well I have handled mangos still with skin many times with no issues. I LOVE eating them, and always had the dream or possibly growing them one day. But the fact remains I do get poison ivy contact dermatitis, but its on the lower spectrum of allergic reactions. Maybe there is hope for the dream lol.

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GottmitAlex

Sorry about that. That mango sap... well, the only thing I'm allergic of are felines. Specifically cats. Not a mild allergy mind you. Hospital grade...

 

Edited by GottmitAlex

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GottmitAlex

It's on! May 29th, barely 10:30am and 81F.  14 miles inland

 

20180529_103629.jpg

Edited by GottmitAlex

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mdsonofthesouth

I do love summer! We have been on for a few weeks save for a day or 2.

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Moose

It's back on after a week of rain. Mangoes are ready, getting harvested.  It's definitely on. 

Trying to stay hydrated until October.

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GottmitAlex

One of the benefits of (accidentally) being in the California sunset zone 23: It's +8c warmer than beachside. 

Temps at 3:03pm pst.

81F/28C

More than sand/drainage, etc, I believe this factor is key.

14+ whatever linear miles inland makes a world of difference. 

Yesterday my Frau and I went to Rosarito Beach. Upon arrival it was an easy -10f compared to our temps inland. 

Foggy and cloudy. So the sun was there, however it could not penetrate the marine-influenced cloud layer. Once we arrived back home, at 7pm, it was cloud free and sunny. 

Here's another pic of the status quo at 3:20pm pst of the garden sliver. The camera is facing west.

So 14+ miles westwardly past the car port door lies the ocean. 

Reading the Temps for Chula Vista,CA, they are -8c of what my three thermometers are producing.

I think this bit of empirical evidence info can contribute to provide a pointer to folks in Socal looking to plant the more tropical palms.

 

20180604_150345.jpg

20180604_151931.jpg

Edited by GottmitAlex
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