Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Tracy

I was out looking at the flush on one of my Cycas thouarsii x cupida, and noticed that the new flush leaflet tips had a significant number of mealybugs on them.  I immediately started thinking about the Cycas scale that has been a problem in so many areas, but fortunately not here in Southern California yet that I am aware.  I went out with the hose and blasted the new leaflets hoping to get rid of most of them, which it did.  Unfortunately some were tenacious and I could see them in a followup about 10 minutes later.  I wasn't real excited to blast it when the foliage is so soft, but felt there were few other options.  It seems that the mealybugs which don't do so well on hardened off Cycas leaves, were having a feast on the still very soft leaflets.

Two shots before blasting and one after the blasting (you can see the leaflets are a bit wilted after the hard spray).  Anyone else have an issue with this and Cycas?  I haven't seen this on my straight Cycas thouarsii nor have I had problems before with either of the Cycas thouarsii x cupida with mealybugs.

20180410-104A9054.jpg

20180410-104A9055.jpg

20180410-104A9060.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GeneAZ

It's a common problem for me because the indigenous prickly pear (Opuntia)  have cochineal scale, as it's called -- which is a mealy insect -- so it will spontaneously appear in my greenhouse on new cycad growth. 

After 35 years of trying various remedies, I landed on Talstar ten years ago to easily control this pest.  You must use a surfactant like 20 drops of Dawn dish soap per quart off mixture.  I blast off the mealy first, then apply the Talstar.  As  long as it is not washed off the plant, it seems to stay  effective against this pest long term.  Additionally, it is safe to use on new tender growth and won't affect the expanding foliage at all; it simply targets the mealy and its eggs/juveniles.  It works equally well as a drench for root mealy.  It also works quite well on  scale insects, even when they have colonized the crevices of a caudex.

Neem oil also works, but you have to apply weekly, usually.

Yours looks to me to be the hibiscus scale, which is very persistent indeed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GDLWyverex
On 4/10/2018, 9:17:31, GeneAZ said:

It's a common problem for me because the indigenous prickly pear (Opuntia)  have cochineal scale, as it's called -- which is a mealy insect -- so it will spontaneously appear in my greenhouse on new cycad growth. 

After 35 years of trying various remedies, I landed on Talstar ten years ago to easily control this pest.  You must use a surfactant like 20 drops of Dawn dish soap per quart off mixture.  I blast off the mealy first, then apply the Talstar.  As  long as it is not washed off the plant, it seems to stay  effective against this pest long term.  Additionally, it is safe to use on new tender growth and won't affect the expanding foliage at all; it simply targets the mealy and its eggs/juveniles.  It works equally well as a drench for root mealy.  It also works quite well on  scale insects, even when they have colonized the crevices of a caudex.

Neem oil also works, but you have to apply weekly, usually.

Yours looks to me to be the hibiscus scale, which is very persistent indeed.

I have had good results using the same procedure and Diazanon

 

 

Richrad

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      I'm wondering if I am too late with the appearance of what appear to be small seeds on the megasporophylls of this Cycas thouarsii x cupida.  I'm still waiting for the male cone to mature on my male plant of the same cross.  The female plant has been giving off a pretty strong odor for close to 3 weeks which is one of the signs I would expect.  Other than my Cycas thouarsii, I don't think I have timed it right with any other Cycas pollination.  Thoughts, advice would be appreciated from someone with more experience pollinating this genus.  With my Cycas thouarsii, I used dry pollination as I had about 3 male cones to choose from and two receptive females at the same time.

    • Jillian
      By Jillian
      Please be gentle, it’s my first request, ha, ha. So a couple of years ago I found someone with a similar problem and they were told that “the white fuzz” on the guys king palm was normal. Well, mine isn’t white close up but it looked like it from the ground. Is this white flies, or mealy bugs?? Don’t suggest soapy water my tress are tall and I need to use a sprayer to take care of this. I’m sad and scared. Thank you. 



    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      It is interesting to see the diversity within a species.  I'm growing a couple of Encephalartos sclavoi.  Perhaps due to age, the older one shows very few spines on the leaflets, even though the younger one still has about a 6" caudex and it's leaflets are loaded with spines.  I hope the smaller one grows out of the spiny leaf and develops a leaf like the older one... I will get a reveal when the next flush finishes opening.  The other thing I doubt will change is that the older one opens with a colorful chocolate mocha fuzzy flush, while the younger spiny form has an attractive fuzzy green flush.  It's not hard to see which color is preferred.



    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      The new flush on the Cycas thouarsii x cupida was a little longer that I expected, while the Caryota is holding almost all its fronds, including the one right over the Cycas.  I know everyone says "don't remove green" from palms.  I also know that the Cycas will appreciate more sun, and I can't even see the top sides of the leaflets on the Cycas now.  The Caryota has plenty of other leaves above, and is a vigorous grower.  It shows no signs that this frond or the one immediate below it (the two lowest its holding) will be turning brown and prepared to drop on their own, any time soon. 
      I also considered where to post this, and decided to favor the "tropical plants other than palms" page rather than the palm page, since the offense would be to the palm, and the protected plant is the non-palm.  So what would you do, follow the common wisdom of leaving everything on the palm, or not stress and remove the offending frond?  To trim... or not to trim?  That is my question.


    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      An Encephalartos princeps is flushing right now and seems to have a couple of aborted or improperly formed new leaves it was trying to push out.  It did something quite similar last year, when a flush ended up aborting everything but three leaves of the flush.  It's not a tiny young plant, as I have plenty of other Encephalartos which push many more leaves at a similar size caudex.  The interesting part is that it seems to be having difficulty on the same side of the caudex, which faces west.  Leaves emerging from the southern, northern and easterly sides are normally formed, but not the west side.  Photos of the plant and closeups of the caudex with the "funky flush".  One year and I would attribute it to a trauma that I might have missed, but two years in a row of a similar phenomena makes me wonder what is going on.



×
×
  • Create New...