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sandgroper

My Perth coconut palm

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Cluster

Hello Dave,

Nice to see it is doing well for you! Did you fertilize it during the winter this year? It seems to me it has more color than in previous years. Keeping my fingers crossed.

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UK_Palms
20 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

I hope she keeps going on mate. Every year it survives it will get tougher and stronger provided it gets enough nutrients in the warmer weather. We had a 20C day here today. All my Beccariophoenix alfredii have remained deep green despite that neg 2.5C we had and the 150mm of rain we have already had in August so far. They are my Cocos equivalent now. A real Cocos would dead by early May here.

You guys had -2.5C at the coast in southwestern WA? :bemused:

At least your Beccariophoenix alfredii's are standing up to that cold and the 6 inches of rain you have had in the past two weeks. It gives me hope for my one here at lat 51N. It was only germinated in the spring, but has been outside since early June and is now on it's 3rd strap leaf. I'll probably bring it indoors by October and continue to mollycoddle it for the next few years.

But ultimately, I will be planting this thing outdoors eventually, once it has a few feet of trunk. We're probably talking a decade from now though. I'll have to put it in a south facing spot with a good microclimate though, no doubt. Even then, we are talking about zone pushing to the max here. I may be trying the impossible this far north... :bummed:

thumbnail_image0-38.jpg

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sandgroper
5 hours ago, Cluster said:

Hello Dave,

Nice to see it is doing well for you! Did you fertilize it during the winter this year? It seems to me it has more color than in previous years. Keeping my fingers crossed.

G'day mate,  yes I did fertilise it several times over winter this year, I use liquid fertiliser, seaweed solution and fish emulsion along with sulphate of potash. The palm does yellow off over winter but does green up again as soon as the weather warms up. I think the winter fertiliser did help, the palm slowed down but has continued to grow over the cold weather and I noticed yesterday a new spear is beginning to open up which is a good sign. Thanks for the support, it's all a big experiment this zone pushing exercise but very rewarding when you see some positive signs.

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sandgroper
7 hours ago, Tyrone said:

I hope she keeps going on mate. Every year it survives it will get tougher and stronger provided it gets enough nutrients in the warmer weather. We had a 20C day here today. All my Beccariophoenix alfredii have remained deep green despite that neg 2.5C we had and the 150mm of rain we have already had in August so far. They are my Cocos equivalent now. A real Cocos would dead by early May here.

I saw the flooding in Albany on the news the other day, it's incredible the amount of rain that fell around the south west. The cockies will be loving it, seems a lot of rain is getting through to the areas that need it, fingers crossed it'll be a bumper year. 

We've had some cold temps in Perth this winter, some of the days have broken records for low temperatures and it's not over, looks like this coming week is another cold one. The days are getting longer, the plants and bees are on the move but winter's not finished with us just yet. I remember this time last year we had a 30c day, we'll only be getting half that tomorrow. 

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Tyrone
7 hours ago, UK_Palms said:

You guys had -2.5C at the coast in southwestern WA? :bemused:

At least your Beccariophoenix alfredii's are standing up to that cold and the 6 inches of rain you have had in the past two weeks. It gives me hope for my one here at lat 51N. It was only germinated in the spring, but has been outside since early June and is now on it's 3rd strap leaf. I'll probably bring it indoors by October and continue to mollycoddle it for the next few years.

But ultimately, I will be planting this thing outdoors eventually, once it has a few feet of trunk. We're probably talking a decade from now though. I'll have to put it in a south facing spot with a good microclimate though, no doubt. Even then, we are talking about zone pushing to the max here. I may be trying the impossible this far north... :bummed:

thumbnail_image0-38.jpg

Give that one enough time to get as big as you can handle it in a pot before letting it handle a uk winter. They are like solar panels so in that respect just like a real Cocos. None of my Beccariophoenix flinched at the -2.5C we had and we were below zero for 8 hrs. Mega frost event for down here. In comparison my trunking roebellinis some which are right next to my bigger Beccies bronzed off. So if you’re growing roebellinis outside you may have a chance with B alfredii.

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UK_Palms
2 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

Give that one enough time to get as big as you can handle it in a pot before letting it handle a uk winter. They are like solar panels so in that respect just like a real Cocos. None of my Beccariophoenix flinched at the -2.5C we had and we were below zero for 8 hrs. Mega frost event for down here. In comparison my trunking roebellinis some which are right next to my bigger Beccies bronzed off. So if you’re growing roebellinis outside you may have a chance with B alfredii.

Yeah, I'll keep it potted and mollycoddled for about a decade or so. Or at least until it has some decent size and a fair bit of trunk to help it survive a winter here. By the time I plant it out though, our winters may have warmed up even more due to global warming/climate change. Winters certainly aren't as cold as they used to be here. They are however a lot wetter these days, but consequently milder. 

My lowest last winter was -3.1C out here in the rural countryside. My nearest big town/city, Guildford, went down to -2.3C. Similar winter low to you. However east-central London and the south coast didn't drop below +1.5C (35F) last winter. No doubt those areas will be better locations to zone push a Beccariophoenix, in regards to winter temps. I don't know whether anyone else is trying them over here? London would certainly be well worth a shout with their milder winters. Better than rural Surrey at least. 

Have you got your Beccies protected against north facing structures, or close to the house? Or are they just out in the open? Also do you irrigate them in summer, or can they take quite a bit of drought? 

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Tyrone
9 hours ago, UK_Palms said:

Yeah, I'll keep it potted and mollycoddled for about a decade or so. Or at least until it has some decent size and a fair bit of trunk to help it survive a winter here. By the time I plant it out though, our winters may have warmed up even more due to global warming/climate change. Winters certainly aren't as cold as they used to be here. They are however a lot wetter these days, but consequently milder. 

My lowest last winter was -3.1C out here in the rural countryside. My nearest big town/city, Guildford, went down to -2.3C. Similar winter low to you. However east-central London and the south coast didn't drop below +1.5C (35F) last winter. No doubt those areas will be better locations to zone push a Beccariophoenix, in regards to winter temps. I don't know whether anyone else is trying them over here? London would certainly be well worth a shout with their milder winters. Better than rural Surrey at least. 

Have you got your Beccies protected against north facing structures, or close to the house? Or are they just out in the open? Also do you irrigate them in summer, or can they take quite a bit of drought? 

No protection. All out in the open. Yes they get irrigation from spring to early winter unless the place floods early. They could probably survive without irrigation ( Ive got peat soil on a valley floor) but that would slow down growth so I irrigate and fertilise to maximise growth. 

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SouthSeaNate
On 8/16/2020 at 3:56 AM, UK_Palms said:

Yeah, I'll keep it potted and mollycoddled for about a decade or so. Or at least until it has some decent size and a fair bit of trunk to help it survive a winter here. By the time I plant it out though, our winters may have warmed up even more due to global warming/climate change. Winters certainly aren't as cold as they used to be here. They are however a lot wetter these days, but consequently milder. 

My lowest last winter was -3.1C out here in the rural countryside. My nearest big town/city, Guildford, went down to -2.3C. Similar winter low to you. However east-central London and the south coast didn't drop below +1.5C (35F) last winter. No doubt those areas will be better locations to zone push a Beccariophoenix, in regards to winter temps. I don't know whether anyone else is trying them over here? London would certainly be well worth a shout with their milder winters. Better than rural Surrey at least. 

Have you got your Beccies protected against north facing structures, or close to the house? Or are they just out in the open? Also do you irrigate them in summer, or can they take quite a bit of drought? 

Beccariophoenix will not survive in the UK, it isn't the minimum temperatures, but once again the fact that daytime highs are far too cool for too long. I tried a decent sized one in my Southsea garden & it died after the first winter in the ground, with only a low of around -1C. You need to look at much more than what minimum temperatures palms can take, as the climate of the UK is completely different, places in Australia, the US & elsewhere in Europe can get below freezing temperatures, but daytime highs rebound into at least the teens or higher.

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sandgroper

The coconut looks pretty ragged but at least it has gone through winter with no protection other than a 2 week period where I wrapped an old removalist blanket around the trunk. It'll green up again now, it's surprising just how quick it comes back with a bit of warm weather.  I'm very pleased with it, very comforting to see that it can tolerate winter unprotected, it might look a bit rough by the end of winter but it still came through.

Screenshot_20200915-155400_Gallery.jpg

Screenshot_20200915-155347_Gallery.jpg

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sipalms
22 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

It'll green up again now, it's surprising just how quick it comes back with a bit of warm weather.  I'm very pleased with it, very comforting to see that it can tolerate winter unprotected, it might look a bit rough by the end of winter but it still came through.

That's great. My Queens (yes I know Queen Palms are a bit of a curse word around here!) are exactly the same. They'll look a bit ragged, tatty and yellow by the end of winter but by mid November I'll be looking at them in amazement. Seem to green up well once the strong sunlight sets in.

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palmsOrl

I never get tired of seeing your coconuts Sandgroper, especially the large one.

Also, it's an extra challenge in a marginal climate because it's a yellow Malayan.

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sandgroper
13 minutes ago, palmsOrl said:

I never get tired of seeing your coconuts Sandgroper, especially the large one.

Also, it's an extra challenge in a marginal climate because it's a yellow Malayan.

Thanks mate. It is a challenge but that's part of the fun. Unfortunately we're a bit limited with the varieties of coconut we can get hold of here, I'd like to try a few of the other varieties if I could get them.

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lzorrito
3 hours ago, sandgroper said:

The coconut looks pretty ragged but at least it has gone through winter with no protection other than a 2 week period where I wrapped an old removalist blanket around the trunk. It'll green up again now, it's surprising just how quick it comes back with a bit of warm weather.  I'm very pleased with it, very comforting to see that it can tolerate winter unprotected, it might look a bit rough by the end of winter but it still came through.

After being through winter with no protection...ragged or not...they are just looking great!

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sandgroper
8 minutes ago, lzorrito said:

After being through winter with no protection...ragged or not...they are just looking great!

Thanks mate!

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sandgroper
3 hours ago, sipalms said:

That's great. My Queens (yes I know Queen Palms are a bit of a curse word around here!) are exactly the same. They'll look a bit ragged, tatty and yellow by the end of winter but by mid November I'll be looking at them in amazement. Seem to green up well once the strong sunlight sets in.

It's amazing how they green up again, you'd think once they turned yellow the fronds days would be numbered but they just turn green again!

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palmsOrl
3 hours ago, palmsOrl said:

I never get tired of seeing your coconuts Sandgroper, especially the large one.

Also, it's an extra challenge in a marginal climate because it's a yellow Malayan.

Or is it golden?  I have indeed seen Malayans I would consider "yellow" and those I would consider "golden".  Then, of course there are "red" as well (and green).

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sandgroper
On 9/15/2020 at 11:20 PM, palmsOrl said:

Or is it golden?  I have indeed seen Malayans I would consider "yellow" and those I would consider "golden".  Then, of course there are "red" as well (and green).

It's a golden Malay dwarf, or that's what it was bought as. We are a bit limited here with what varieties we can get. I have no idea what the small one is but I do think it's a different type, it seems to be a lot tougher than the large one, that little bugger sailed through winter with zero help from me.

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GottmitAlex
15 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

It's a golden Malay dwarf, or that's what it was bought as. We are a bit limited here with what varieties we can get. I have no idea what the small one is but I do think it's a different type, it seems to be a lot tougher than the large one, that little bugger sailed through winter with zero help from me.

And they're growing nicely Dave!

:greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:

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