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sandgroper

My Perth coconut palm

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wrigjef
On 12/6/2019 at 10:01 PM, Tyrone said:

If you made a purpose built 15m tall atrium and enclosed the coconut in winter and grew it like an indoor plant during the cooler months then opened it up during summer then you would get it to fruit in Perth. Not many people have the money or space to do that though. It would be cool to design and build a house around a central atrium like that and put a Coconut and some lipstick palms in.

Tyrone has a great point about building an atrium or greenhouse around it in winter. 

I live in Phoenix, Arizona and have a Coco in the ground for over 3 years now.  7 years from a seed.  I kept in a pot for 4 years before planting.  
 

SandGroper,

    Your Palm looks awesome, especially with the lack of protection. I think with minimal protection and a halogen lamp on it in cool nights It would fruit. You give me hope in AZ 

The second tree is my Baccariophoenix Alfredii which is a great alternative to the Coconut.  The one pictured was grown from a seed from a friend and is 5 years old.  So far they do great in Arizona.  This one is in my screened porch until it gets planted in spring next to the pool. 

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sandgroper
1 hour ago, wrigjef said:

Tyrone has a great point about building an atrium or greenhouse around it in winter. 

I live in Phoenix, Arizona and have a Coco in the ground for over 3 years now.  7 years from a seed.  I kept in a pot for 4 years before planting.  
 

SandGroper,

    Your Palm looks awesome, especially with the lack of protection. I think with minimal protection and a halogen lamp on it in cool nights It would fruit. You give me hope in AZ 

The second tree is my Baccariophoenix Alfredii which is a great alternative to the Coconut.  The one pictured was grown from a seed from a friend and is 5 years old.  So far they do great in Arizona.  This one is in my screened porch until it gets planted in spring next to the pool. 

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1990926E-E2CF-4925-89E9-3A6A7C826B44.jpeg

I protected my coconut with a plastic greenhouse over winter for as long as I could, it just grew too big to protect any longer. I still make an effort to do what I can but it is quite difficult now. It would be great have it fruit but I don't think it ever will although we live in hope! I'm very happy to have one growing but a fruiting one in Perth would be great, if it does ever happen Palmtalk will be the first to hear about it, I'll be a very excitable boy!

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Tyrone
6 hours ago, sandgroper said:

I protected my coconut with a plastic greenhouse over winter for as long as I could, it just grew too big to protect any longer. I still make an effort to do what I can but it is quite difficult now. It would be great have it fruit but I don't think it ever will although we live in hope! I'm very happy to have one growing but a fruiting one in Perth would be great, if it does ever happen Palmtalk will be the first to hear about it, I'll be a very excitable boy!

The way everything is getting warmer across the globe and in Perth you will be the first to succeed.

Myself I will be really chuffed to get a fruiting Beccariophoenix alfredii. They are my coconut alternative. However if I want to eat something with coconut flesh my Parajubaea fruit will be it (but I think I would feel bad eating them, and would rather see them growing) and if I find a way to make them grow fast maybe Jubaea fruit by the time I’m 80.

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sandgroper
1 minute ago, Tyrone said:

The way everything is getting warmer across the globe and in Perth you will be the first to succeed.

Myself I will be really chuffed to get a fruiting Beccariophoenix alfredii. They are my coconut alternative. However if I want to eat something with coconut flesh my Parajubaea fruit will be it (but I think I would feel bad eating them, and would rather see them growing) and if I find a way to make them grow fast maybe Jubaea fruit by the time I’m 80.

Tyrone, if by some miracle my coconut ever does fruit I will drive down to Albany and we'll eat one together washed down by a few frothy's. I  read everything you ever wrote about your coconut over the past 6 odd years that I've been a member here and learnt a lot from your contributions so at the very least I owe you a coconut mate. I really have had a lot of fun playing around with growing one, I've worked out methods that seem to help but most of what I've been able to do is simply learning from yourself and others and just developing my own ideas from there. So thanks to you mate, you gave me hope that they can grow in Perth if you want one bad enough.

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sandgroper

Looking dark green and pushing out new fronds regularly,  this is definitely the happy time of year for this fella.

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Mr. Coconut Palm
8 hours ago, sandgroper said:

Looking dark green and pushing out new fronds regularly,  this is definitely the happy time of year for this fella.

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Dave,

I hope it gets some good growth for you over the summer there, and the little one adjacent to it too.  Good work, and keep us all posted!!!

John

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BrianRBruning@gmail.com

Someone should try importing half mature coconut trunks and planting them.  More mature palms are hardier than seedlings.  

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sandgroper
6 minutes ago, BrianRBruning@gmail.com said:

Someone should try importing half mature coconut trunks and planting them.  More mature palms are hardier than seedlings.  

Apart from the few of us that really want one there wouldn't be too many people here that would be too bothered about growing them, if they want to see a coconut palm they'll just drive 4 hours further north in the state and see them in Geraldton.

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sandgroper

Nice green growth on the little one and on his big brother, everything is going well at the moment. 

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GottmitAlex
2 hours ago, sandgroper said:

Nice green growth on the little one and on his big brother, everything is going well at the moment. 

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:greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:  Way to go Dave! Fantastic job!

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sandgroper

Thanks Alex, just love that nice dark green colour.

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sandgroper

First day of Autumn here in Oz and the coconut is going well, way too big for winter protection this year so hopefully it'll be a nice mild one when it gets here.

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sandgroper

A month into winter this year with no protection from the elements other than a reflective, metallic table cloth taped to the window! This thing cost only $6 but it's reflective surface is incredible, I actually think it works better than the reflective roofing insulation I've used in the past. Unfortunately the palm is just too big to cover or protect but hopefully it has enough size and hardiness now to continue to survive on its own, time will tell. It looks a bit tatty as I've left the dead and crook fronds in place to help insulate the palm, we'll see what happens. I'm really impressed with the cheap metallic disposable table cloth though, you can see how effective it is by the shadow the palms create, these shadows are towards the sun! 

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GottmitAlex

Keep it up Dave! Smart move with the tablecloth.

Keep us apprised.

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sandgroper

Cheers Alex, I've been using silver roofing insulation for years to reflect sunlight but saw these table cloths a month or so back and thought they could work, they're incredibly reflective, I'm really impressed with them, they're wafer thin but if you stand in front of it you can really feel the warmth being reflected and you can't look at it, it's just too bright. Not bad to play around with for $6! :D

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Cluster

Dave good luck with the winter, please don't forget to fertilize during winter this year for comparison! :)

 

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sandgroper

I've just fertilised my coconut palms, I usually do it a couple of times over winter but I'm going to do it a bit more regularly this winter and see if it helps as they have no protection this year. 

This is what I use, in summer I fertilize weekly with the liquid fertiliser and monthly with the sulphate of potash but I'll use the liquid fertiliser probably every 3 weeks during this winter.

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greysrigging
37 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

I've just fertilised my coconut palms, I usually do it a couple of times over winter but I'm going to do it a bit more regularly this winter and see if it helps as they have no protection this year. 

This is what I use, in summer I fertilize weekly with the liquid fertiliser and monthly with the sulphate of potash but I'll use the liquid fertiliser probably every 3 weeks during this winter.

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They're all good stuff, and like any food/fertilizer, variety is the spice of life. I like to mix it up a bit, not using one product exclusively ( other than diluted urine, which I can produce profusely haha ). I also use the products diluted somewhat as foliar sprays as well.... plants love it !

 

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sandgroper

I use the urine too, watered down it's fantastic. I even tried justifying my beer intake by suggesting it was a necessary ingredient in my liquid fertiliser manufacturing process but my lovely bride saw straight through that effort. Was worth a shot. :D

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Fi Melbourne

 Beautiful coconut tree. You are doing a great job Sandgroper. I  used to live in Malaysia,  surrounded by coconut trees. Kinda miss the view. :lol:  And I would love to be able to grow one here in Melbourne but I don't think it will survive due to the cold weather in winter. I might just try growing it indoor as house plant :P

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sandgroper

Well we are right smack bang in the depths of winter, today has been one of the coldest, bleakest days I can remember, I could see my breath for most of the day which is very rare here thank God, couldn't tolerate days like this too often.  The coconut(s) are still alive but probably aren't enjoying the weather much, they have no protection this year. Another 6 odd weeks and I'll know if they've survived winter, not sure I will, the cold temps have been very unpleasant. 

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Fi Melbourne

The little one seems ok. The big ones just have  a slight frost damage on the leaves. Fingers crossed they will survive and become strong again when spring comes.

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sandgroper

The tips of the fronds have windburn from the cold winds we've had, fortunately we don't really get frosts.

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GottmitAlex

 Dave, how long have you had the little one in the ground?

 

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sandgroper
15 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

 Dave, how long have you had the little one in the ground?

 

About 18 months I think. It's never been looked after to the extent that the big one has but has performed really well. It was very skinny & spindly when it went in but has thickened up a lot and is now starting to push upwards. I'm pleasantly surprised by it, I'm sure it's a different type of coconut to the large one and seems much more suited to our climate.

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GottmitAlex
15 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

About 18 months I think. It's never been looked after to the extent that the big one has but has performed really well. It was very skinny & spindly when it went in but has thickened up a lot and is now starting to push upwards. I'm pleasantly surprised by it, I'm sure it's a different type of coconut to the large one and seems much more suited to our climate.

Did you protect it last winter? 

I like your approach on not draping/protecting it. 

I protected mine (all except my red Tahiti dwarf) throughout their first two winters. I have not protected them since. 

I said to to myself (referencing Ivan Drago): " If they die, they die." 

All I wanted to know know by doing that was if they were hardy enough for my microclimate.

 

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sandgroper
32 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

Did you protect it last winter? 

I like your approach on not draping/protecting it. 

I protected mine (all except my red Tahiti dwarf) throughout their first two winters. I have not protected them since. 

I said to to myself (referencing Ivan Drago): " If they die, they die." 

All I wanted to know know by doing that was if they were hardy enough for my microclimate.

 

No mate, I didn't protect it last winter, it probably got a bit of protection from what I did to look after the big one but neither of them have any protection this winter which is a bit more severe than last year so we'll see what happens. I think your heat lamps will help yours through the coldest nights, I haven't done that but I did intend to pile lawn clippings around them to generate warmth and to insulate but I just never got round to it. Time will tell mate, I'll know how they've gone in another month and a half.

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GottmitAlex
14 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

No mate, I didn't protect it last winter, it probably got a bit of protection from what I did to look after the big one but neither of them have any protection this winter which is a bit more severe than last year so we'll see what happens. I think your heat lamps will help yours through the coldest nights, I haven't done that but I did intend to pile lawn clippings around them to generate warmth and to insulate but I just never got round to it. Time will tell mate, I'll know how they've gone in another month and a half.

Nice! What I meant by "protection" was tarps above them to deflect cold rain.

The heat lamps are trained on the soil for those cold nights. 

 

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sandgroper
28 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

Nice! What I meant by "protection" was tarps above them to deflect cold rain.

The heat lamps are trained on the soil for those cold nights. 

 

No mate, no tarps, no protection at all, they're completely exposed to the elements day and night.

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GottmitAlex
6 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

No mate, no tarps, no protection at all, they're completely exposed to the elements day and night.

Well done!

 

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sandgroper

5 weeks of winter left here in Perth, we are 2/3rds of the way through and although we've had some very cold days and nights the worst should be behind us now. The coconuts, particularly the big one, look a bit rough but fingers crossed it looks like they'll get through winter in reasonable condition considering it's the first time they've gone through completely unprotected in any way. They don't look as good as they do in Broome or Coral Bay etc... but for Jandakot they look great, I'm very pleased with them, here's hoping they can see out the next 5 - 7 weeks then I'll rest easy.

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GottmitAlex

Way to go Dave!

Personally,  I would protect them as much as I REASONABLY could. No ladders or tarps  but a simple brood lamp can go a long way. 

That's the reason I bought the red Tahiti (true dwarf).  Because those can be protected for a very long time in a common-sense manner. 

My hat's off to you for going full bore on this.

Keep us apprised.

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GottmitAlex

Dave. How are your coconuts doing? It's been two weeks and you're in the heart of winter.

@sandgroper

 

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sandgroper
3 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Dave. How are your coconuts doing? It's been two weeks and you're in the heart of winter.

@sandgroper

 

They're looking a bit rough Alex but it's been extremely cold here this past fortnight,  we've broken records, we had one day where the temperature only got to 12c which was the coldest August day ever recorded. I'll be glad when this cold spell is over it really has been freezing cold for us, even today is only 18c. Fortunately the silver reflective stuff I have put up around the coconut make a difference and the temps at the base of the palm are quite good, I also wrapped an old blanket around the big palm during the week which should help. The tips of the fronds look pretty fried with the cold winds but there's not much I can do about that. Hopefully it will start warming up again over the next couple of weeks, here's hoping!

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GottmitAlex

18c isn't bad at all! 

What are your lows? 

Here we get 17C-20C lows and of course, 28C-37C highs (during our summer).

I was worried for the worst since you went full bore on no protection for the cocos.

 

 

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sandgroper

Our lows are about the same, 17c to 21c winter temps but they can be colder and warmer than that, summer can be from 32c to 42c but, again, it can be cooler or hotter than that. We've had some very cold mornings this past fortnight too, I think the coldest got down to 4c in Jandakot. We're in for a big storm tomorrow with strong winds and up to 40mm of rain, Monday the winds should calm a bit but still expecting another 35mm of rain then. No complaints about the rain just not keen on damaging winds and cold temps.

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GottmitAlex
3 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

Our lows are about the same, 17c to 21c winter temps but they can be colder and warmer than that, summer can be from 32c to 42c but, again, it can be cooler or hotter than that. We've had some very cold mornings this past fortnight too, I think the coldest got down to 4c in Jandakot. We're in for a big storm tomorrow with strong winds and up to 40mm of rain, Monday the winds should calm a bit but still expecting another 35mm of rain then. No complaints about the rain just not keen on damaging winds and cold temps.

Dave. Your lows are 17c in winter? 

You are set.

 

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sandgroper
5 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Dave. Your lows are 17c in winter? 

You are set.

 

No mate, our minimum lows are much lower than that, I think Perth's average winter low is around 8c so pretty chilly, our winter high is somewhere between 17c and 21c but, of course, it can be colder or warmer than that in both our mins and max winter temps.

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sandgroper

Two weeks left of winter in southern Australia now and this morning just feels like there is a change, the fruit trees are putting out little shoots, flowers are opening and the weather just has that "feel" about it. We are in for a cold week ahead but I think change is in the air which makes me quite happy as although the coconut looks a bit ragged I think it'll survive. It has had no protection from the elements this winter apart from a two week period where I wrapped an old removalist blanket around the trunk. The photos don't really do it justice, although it looks a bit rough it really does look much better in real life than the photos would suggest. I am pretty pleased with it and am quietly confident that it will get through it's first winter virtually unprotected. 

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Tyrone

I hope she keeps going on mate. Every year it survives it will get tougher and stronger provided it gets enough nutrients in the warmer weather. We had a 20C day here today. All my Beccariophoenix alfredii have remained deep green despite that neg 2.5C we had and the 150mm of rain we have already had in August so far. They are my Cocos equivalent now. A real Cocos would dead by early May here.

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