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Lundkvist Palm Garden

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bgl

Jason,

Thanks! When we bought the initial 3 acres (Feb 1996), to build our house, and establish a palm garden, I knew instinctively that I wanted to plant by region. It just made a lot of sense based on what I wanted to achieve. I've always been interested in geography and travel. To me, having a bunch of Madagascar or New Caledonia palms (for instance) in the same area, gives me almost a sense of being there. When I walk on Vanuatu Walk thru our Carpoxylon grove I feel I have a little bit of Vanuatu right here. Mixing palms from different continents wouldn't give me that feeling. Having said that, though, there are, by necessity, certain areas that I consider "transition areas". In other words, where palms from different continents are very close to each other, or even interspersed.

The actual design of the 3 acres was pretty simple. The typical "Leilani acre" is 100-436 ft/30.5x133 m. We had 3 of them side by side, so 300x436 ft/91.5-133 m. There was a fairly open (and flat) area in the center, about two thirds back on the property, so it was a given to open up that area and build the house there. After the bulldozer was done with that I had him open up a number of secondary driveways, away from the housepad (and circling it). These are now all paved and are wide enough (just barely) that I can drive on them with our car. Since I wanted to plant by region, it was an easy decision to put all the palms of the Americas behind the house, since that area was considerably smaller than the area between the house and the street, and I knew I was going to have many more palms from SE Asia, Madagascar and the Pacific. After the secondary driveways were in place, we began to handclear the various areas in between them, and build footpaths using red cinder. The ground is VERY uneven here, so it was always a surprise to clear a new area, because we'd find ups and downs in the landscape that had previously been covered by vegetation, most of which was invasive so I had no qualms about removing it.

Two other priorities when I designed our garden was to avoid straight lines, wherever possible AND to create more interest in the landscape by attempting to make each area separate and removed from the surrounding areas. Ideally, when standing in one open space and viewing the palms & plants in that area I don't want to be able to see people who might be in the next open area on the other side of those palms. The fact that I like the jungle look didn't hurt with this philosophy!

I think I covered everything but if you have any more questions, ask away! :)

Bo-Göran

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Kris

Dear Bo Goran  :)

thanks for the info on wal's palm.i thought it was sabal riverside Sp.and i must say that the carypoha one that i got

recently its colour is not as greenish as the Talipot palms or the C.locomteei.its mild ash in colour and the leaves are trying to split and try emerge some charastristic..

but the color is not what is in our forums memeber stills of talipot palms !

thanks & Love,

Kris  :)

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LJG

Just another plam garden. If you've seen one, you've seen them all....

:D

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Kom Thai Palm

Bo,

Incredible garden!!!, I very like your idea, hopefully you create new more Trail, Valley or Drive in the future more and more. Although I'm not actually there but I think we all here certainly enjoy your pictures.

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Carlo Morici

:o You are having a big time! Great report. Good luck, Bo.

Carlo

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mike in kurtistown

Bo,

Still awe-inspiring, and I am getting ideas for designing my 5 1/2 acres, 8 1/3 when I eliminate strawberry guavas in my ravine. I recall your saying that your canopy palms (Clinostigma, Carpoxylon, Actinorhytus, others?) may have been planted too close together and were cutting out moisture for plants beneath. What do you recommend for an optimum spacing for these?

I like the idea of geographical groupings. However, dispersing related species (Pritchardias, Livistonas, etc.) could have the advantage of preventing cross-pollination. Now I don't know what to do!

Mike

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bgl

Everybody, thanks for the comments!

And Mike, with Clinostigmas you have to be careful. They provide a great canopy (and will get up in size quickly, with about 2.5-3.0 ft of new trunk every year), but if you plant them closer than about 12 ft, center-to-center, you're going to have a couple of unrelated problems: 1) the canopy will eventually be so tight that it won't let rain thru. The rain will land on the fronds, and then travel down the trunk of the palm to the ground, leaving areas in between bone-dry. 2) Clinostigmas have very aggressive roots, and they will pretty much choke out everything else that's planted within a 6 ft radius. And if you plant something that close, and it manages to survive (I have done that in a few cases), then the smaller palm will be a bonsai palm. It'll never grow to its full potential. One other problem that you also need to be aware of with Clinostigmas (no matter at what distance from each other you plant them) is that the falling fronds can create havoc among smaller palms below. 15-18 ft apart is a reasonably good distance if you want the Clinostigma fronds to be overlapping, and then you can also plant a few things in between. If you have the space, and want to plant more stuff in between, then 24-30 ft, center-to-center, is optimal.

Actinorhytis calapparia is even faster than C. samoense, and will add about 4 ft of trunk per year. A more slender palm, and the falling fronds don't weigh much so you don't have to be concerned about damage from them. If you want a tight look, 7-8 ft apart is not too close. 10-12 ft apart is probably optimal if you want a nice canopy that's going to let the rain thru unhindered.

I havn't used Carpoxylons as a canopy palm. The area where we have our 75 Carpoxylons is exclusively Carpoxylon territory. No other palms! Even though it's not a slow palm, it doesn't come close to Clinostigmas or Actinorhytis as far as growth rate goes. IF you do intend to use them for canopy; 1) be patient, and 2) plant them at least 18 ft apart. The crown is fairly dense.

Other palms I can think of that would be good for canopy: Bentinckia nicobarica, Carpentaria, Veitchia, Bactris gasipaes, Euterpe (single trunked ones), Wodyetia, Dypsis madagascariensis and any species in the former Gulubia genus (now lumped in under Hydriastele). Other palms that are a little bit slower than these (but certainly as fast as a Carpoxylon); Chambeyronia macrocarpa, Neoveitchia storckii and Dypsis leptocheilos. This is by no means a complete list. Just the ones I can think of right now!

Regarding geographical plantings - there's nothing to say you can't exercise some flexibility! I have my Pritchardias spread out all over the place. Of course, I don't know if that's enough to prevent hybridization. If you like the concept, then create certain areas for palms from Madasgascar, New Caledonia, etc. and if there are certain palms you want to be more flexible with, then why not? I have Clinostigmas spread out pretty much all over the place in those areas where I have "Old world" palms. I can take a photo of Clinostigmas with Lemurophoenix in between them for instance!

Incidentally, the fastest of them all, Pigafetta, is not a good choice - IMO - as a canopy palm, because the fronds have thousands of very annoying spines. The falling frond is not very heavy, though, because it tends to hang on to the palm for a couple of weeks before falling down. A Clinostigma frond won't do that, it'll just fall!

Good luck!

Bo-Göran

Edit: I should probably point out that you can certainly plant Clinostigmas MUCH closer than 12 ft. Check out post 51. There are Clinostigmas in that area that are no more than 2 ft apart, and most of them are around 6-10 ft apart. And they all look great and are very healthy. Some of them may grow at slightly less than optimal speed, but so what!

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Walter John

Oh to have the space to have that flexibilty in plantings. 12 feet apart etc. When you're a suburban palm nut with little space, one can only do what one can only do with palmaholicism. Plant close.

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mike in kurtistown

Bo,

Thanks for the spacing and other info. This will go into my files for future reference.

Mike

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MediaHound

(bgl @ May 26 2007,18:27)

QUOTE
A few more steps, and we're at an intersection. Colombian Path continues to the left, and Panama Path (which we will be taking in order to get back out onto Caribbean Way) goes to the right. I used to be able to push a wheelbarrow thru here. The roots from the Socratea (and they can go 15 ft out from the plant) have effectively blocked off the entrance to Panama Path...

Hmm... maybe a new bridge is in order  ???

:)

Anyway... like I said before, great photos, you have an amazing collection of palms and a beautiful property to adhere them to. Kudos!

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Mats

Remember the old Nike Ad Campaign, 'Bo Knows'?

to view the commercial.

Well, 'our' Bo knows palms!

.

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ariscott

Gosh.... what a garden.... It must be constant work to make it look so immaculate.

BTW, I absolutely love those clinostigma samoense. I can understand why they are your favourite palm, Bo. I would not mind a few myself. Do they tend to drop their fronds like royals do? I was thinking of putting them near our outside ensuite... so, we can look up one day and see nice canopies, but then... it they drop fronds, it can be disasterous for our heads... :)

Regards, Ari :)

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bgl

Thanks everybody for your comments! And Ari, yes, Clinostigma fronds are very similar to Roystonea fronds. They are heavy (never weighed either of them, but I think they're very similar in weight), and the Clinostigma palms are VERY efficient in dropping them. In other words, the fronds come off VERY quickly and without warning. (Some other palm fronds tend to hang on for a few days before falling). Don't plant them closer than 15 ft to where people may sit or congregate!

Bo-Göran

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Walter John

(ariscott @ May 29 2007,17:32)

QUOTE
Gosh.... what a garden.... It must be constant work to make it look so immaculate.

BTW, I absolutely love those clinostigma samoense. I can understand why they are your favourite palm, Bo. I would not mind a few myself. Do they tend to drop their fronds like royals do? I was thinking of putting them near our outside ensuite... so, we can look up one day and see nice canopies, but then... it they drop fronds, it can be disasterous for our heads... :)

Regards, Ari :)

Hello Ari and Scott

Long time no hear, how are things up there now. You'll have to post a new thread on your landscaping and building, driveway etc. What palms and other plants are in the plan. People here would love to know (especially me). I wanna go back there something chronic. I know a couple of members on this board are planning a trip later this year, on a mission for you know what.

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RRONNIE

Bo,

I think you by now i can manage "words drawing" - Alas, when in such "wow" no one comes to mind now - so just this: ah ah aaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhh, boy that was a good one ! :laugh:

BTW - Do you have your own Zip Code ?  :D

Ronnie

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Mike4284m

(bgl @ May 26 2007,19:13)

QUOTE
Looking up to our left, there's a Calamus all the way to the left, the taller single trunked palm is a Ponapea ledermanniana, our largest Johannesteijssmannia altifrons is just above the steps, and to the right of it (and about 15 ft behind) is a group of Iguanura wallichiana.

That's a great looking J. altifrons.  About how tall is it?  Do you have any J. magnifica?

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bgl

Ronnie,

That's a good one....! :)  And, no, unless you count the additional 4 digits that have been added to the original 5 digit zip code, we don't have our own! As a matter of fact, the 96778 zip code for Pahoa (about 4 miles away from us, and that's where the post office is) covers a very large area of the lower Puna district.

Mike,

That J. altifrons is just over 7 ft tall. I do have a few smaller J. magnificas. These are beautiful palms, but they are VERY slow here. My guess is that they thrive (and grow faster) in a more humid and hotter environment, i.e. close to the equator. There's a spectacular group in Singapore Botanic Garden and they are considerably hotter than we are.

Bo-Göran

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Shon

Hey Bo any chance you can get a couple of shots of your Dictyocaryum lamarckianum?

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ariscott

(Wal @ May 29 2007,07:56)

QUOTE

Hello Ari and Scott

Long time no hear, how are things up there now. You'll have to post a new thread on your landscaping and building, driveway etc. What palms and other plants are in the plan. People here would love to know (especially me). I wanna go back there something chronic. I know a couple of members on this board are planning a trip later this year, on a mission for you know what.

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bgl

Ari,

Actinorhytis calapparia is a more slender palm and would be an excellent substitute. Faster than the Clinostigma and not as massive. Fronds, even though relatively long, won't cause any damage when falling.

Shon,

here are two of the Dictyocaryum, photo taken a month ago. I think I already posted this elsewhere.

Bo-Göran

post-22-1180484218_thumb.jpg

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bgl

And since Wal wanted photos of new planting areas, here's one more. Not very impressive at this time. This area is on the land we're leasing from Kamehameha Schools, and it's right next to our shadehouse. I've planted 12 Bismarckias in this area. Spaced them out about 25 ft/7.5 m. center-to-center in order to give them plenty of space when they grow up. The tallest ones are only about 3 ft tall at this time. You can make out four of them in this photo.

post-22-1180484499_thumb.jpg

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bgl

And to put things a little bit in perspective, here's the shadehouse with a bunch of Clinostigma samoense in front of it, and a number of small Bismarckias in 5G pots just to the right. The open area to the right of the shadehouse is where I've planted the 12 Bismarckias. The one that's closest to the shadehouse is probably about 35 ft away (from the shadehouse), but I really can't make out any of them in this photo... :( Well, maybe JUST barely since I know exactly where to look, but it's definitely a challenge!

post-22-1180484715_thumb.jpg

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Shon

Thanks Bo, love that blue on that palm.

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Mike4284m

Came across this thread while looking for another.  I thought people might appreciate a second look.

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DoomsDave

Need to put a grab bar on the Swooning sofa . . .

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el-blanco

Bo,

Do you ever come across Karel Havliczeck?  IF so please tell him Jeff White from Dana Point said hello!

THanks,  J

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PALM MOD

Hey Jeff,

I talk with Karel from time to time, and even exchange my money for his plants. :)

I'll tell him hello as well.

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Chuck B

Bo,basically all I can do is echo what all the others say,but your piece of paradise is just awesome,and truly an inspiration to us little guys.I love seeing your home pics!Feel free to keep posting,and posting,as many times as you'd like,I'll never get bored with them.

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bgl

Jeff,

Yes, Karel is a very good friend. He actually lived on Makamae Street here in Leilani Estates a few years ago (right after moving here from SoCal, and before moving to his present location in Hilo). As a matter of fact I'm overdue for a sushi dinner with him! :)

Chuck,

Thanks a lot - I have to go thru the entire thread and see if I can add anything that I didn't already cover.

Bo-Göran

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amazondk

Bo,

I don't remember reading this whole thread before.  But, I did now and it is great.  It gives me some ideas for my project here at Bela Vista.  Also, I like the Amazonas trail.  It sort of reminds me of home.  You certainly have marked the Earth in your spot.  It looks great.

dk

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palmislandRandy

Bo, I don't know if this was asked, but, how do you maintain such a large collection? How many "ranch hands" do you have? Oh yeah, do you fertilize them all, or do they need it ?  Just magnificent, thanks for posting :D   Randy

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bgl

Don and Randy,

Thanks! One "ranch hand" only. His name is Ed, and he's been working here for 10 years now. He's here about 15 hours a week, and does misc. things, such as mowing grass, weedwhacking, collecting fallen fronds etc. and I do a little myself obviously, even though I do spend most of my available time in the shadehouse in the nursery area. Ed is of course not a palm person, but over the years he's picked up quite a few names, so if I ask him to pick up some fallen fronds from a Pigafetta or Clinostigma or whatever, he'll know what I mean.

My plan several years ago was to fertilize once a year with Nutricote 180 day time release, and the palms certainly seemed to be happy with that. Not that they weren't happy before I began that "program" (a few years after my first plantings). However, it's a) a very big job (takes me a couple of months), and B) it's expensive. So, now it's more like once every 2 years. Can't tell the difference. In some specific cases if it looks like a particular palm (species) is suffering from lack of nutrition I'll spread some fertilizer in that area. That's unusual, though.

Bo-Göran

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realarch

Looking forward to seeing your place is putting it mildly. Will be back in Hilo the weekend of the 29th....just a couple of weeks!

Tim

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Wai`anae Steve

Bo great garden.  Wish I had started when I first bought 25 years ago.

My place is not as pretty as yours that's for sure.

I began planting by "location" also but I just decided in the past year to mix as much a possable to try to stop cross pollination.

someday I'll get around to posting a bunch of "area" shots rather than just one palm at a time.  But I'll have to clear a bunch of rubbish first.   :P

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bgl

Tim and Steve,

Thanks a lot! Tim - I look forward to seeing you in a couple of weeks. And Steve - I guess it still remains to be seen but I don't believe cross polination is going to much of a problem. Many of the palms seem to flower at different times. And IF they do cross polinate - well, I should end up with some interesting hybrids! :)

Bo-Göran

Matt (MattyB) and Paul (pohonkelapa) visited us in Nov 2007 and Matt very generously offered to bring me some more "street signs" for some of my paths and driveways that did not have signs. This is one of the signs he brought: Kerriodoxa Valley. Took the photo late this afternoon and was running out of daylight, so will shoot some of the others tomorrow.

THANKS MATT!! :)

post-22-1203136631_thumb.jpg

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bgl

Finally got around to taking a few more pics of the signs that Matt brought. Here's Clinostigma Cathedral (with C. samoense in the background).

post-22-1203212796_thumb.jpg

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bgl

Polynesian Circle with group of Dypsis sp. bejofa. And in case you wonder what Dypsis palms are doing in Polynesian Circle, one half of the circle is planted with palms from the South Pacific, and the other half is in "Madagascar territory"! :)

post-22-1203212954_thumb.jpg

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bgl

Pemba Path. Sorry, couldn't really get any palms in this shot, except the Pritchardia lowreyana on the left (out of focus - sorry!). But there's a nice blue orchid in the upper left!

post-22-1203213102_thumb.jpg

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bgl

Masoala Trail with group of Marojejya darianii.

post-22-1203213247_thumb.jpg

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bgl

And since I was out taking pictures, couldn't resist a few more. Here's another group of Marojejya darianii, actually right off Pemba Path. These are in fairly deep shade.

(And Matt, still have two more signs that I actually didn't put up yet - Pacific Drive and the second Polynesian Circle sign. Need to attach those to the rockwalls, but will take care of that soon. And post pics to prove it... :)  Again, thanks a lot!).

post-22-1203213461_thumb.jpg

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