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bgl

Lundkvist Palm Garden

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bgl

Bill, Bob and Jim - thanks a lot for your comments. And, Bob, yeah, there's definitely always something to be done here, but I certainly didn't mind taking time to shoot these photos and post them. (My mother always used to say "we do the things we want to do." That was of course in reference to me not spending as much time on her as I should have... And that's why my desk is a mess. I'd rather be out in the garden! :D ).

Kris,

Post 74 is of Wal and a Corypha in Darwin. What flowering plant are you referring to? (What post, I mean)

Pablo,

Thanks a lot for your comments. We certainly enjoyed having you and Larry stay here last month. And in case you didn't realize it, statistically there's a pretty good chance that you'll end up living here on the Big Island, as have many past IPS Presidents. A few years ago we actually had four IPS ex-Presidents living here: Al Bredeson, Jules Gervais, Ken Foster and Donn Carlsmith. Ken and Donn unfortunately died a few years ago.

Terry,

You actually put some ideas in my head (not always a good thing! :P ). I'll send you a PM.

OK, time to wrap up this tour before you guys drop out of exhaustion...

Here's the upper end of Metroxylon Avenue with a bunch of Areca vestiaria and two Pigafetta elata towering over them. The gate is our side gate (off the end of Kumakahi Street), and when we get cinder-soil deliveries in big trucks (for instance) this is where they come in.

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ron@springhammock

(bgl @ May 25 2007,20:43)

QUOTE
Ron, that could take a while....

Oh, darn.  I was already there...riding a mower through tropical palm paradise, with one hand on the wheel and another on a Mai Tai. :(

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bgl

Turning the corner and facing east, along the back side of our property is Satellite Drive, lined with a row of Roystonea oleracea on the south (right) side. In case you wonder about the name, we used to have a large 14 ft satellite dish here, but replaced that monstrosity with a much smaller dish on top the roof a few years ago. This photo was taken against the sun, so it's a little bit dark. Another photo will be coming up below, facing the opposite direction.

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bgl

Ron,

I don't know about that Mai Tai. Somehow you must have gotten the wrong impression of what we do here... :D

A few feet onto Satellite Drive and we're getting ready to make a left turn onto Iquitos Trail

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Walter John
Post 74 is of Wal and a Corypha in Darwin.

Negatory Bo, that's the biggest of the Darwin Lodocieas.

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bgl

Wal,

I knew that!!!! My mind was just elsewhere.... :D

Here's the entrance to Iquitos Trail. A row of 19 Euterpe oleracea on the right hand side, planted 4 ft center-to-center provides an impenetrable wall as you walk down this trail. Allagoptera arenaria in front of it, and another Roystonea oleracea to the left of the trail.

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bgl

And a few feet onto the trail, plenty of palms and misc other plants.

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bgl

And from the same vantage point, looking up into a canopy of one Roystonea oleracea and numerous Iriartea deltoides

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bgl

Continuing on Iquitos Trail, we actually end up on Amazonas Walk, and then we make a right turn onto Atlantic Drive, and after walking past a row of Roystonea oleracea and R. regia, this is the view at the end of Atlantic Drive: a group of Mauritiella armata with the ohi'a forest (Kamehameha Schools property) behind it. The rockwall has two signs: Satellite Drive to the right and Caribbean Way to the left.

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bgl

And looking west (to our right) is Satellite Drive with the row of Roystonea oleracea (see also post 83). In front of them is our one and only Acoelorraphe wrightii.

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bgl

Looking the opposite direction, and after taking a few steps on Caribbean Way, we have this view of a row of Roystonea regia and a few Attaleas.

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bgl

At about the same spot, and to our left, is the entrance to Colombian Path with a group of Euterpe oleracea that I have planted in a complete circle. The path goes right thru the circle.

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bgl

Taking a few steps inside the circle and looking straight up, this is the view. These palms were all planted 11 years ago, and they were about 8-9 ft tall at that time. Today, they're 40-45 ft.

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bgl

A few more steps, and we're at an intersection. Colombian Path continues to the left, and Panama Path (which we will be taking in order to get back out onto Caribbean Way) goes to the right. I used to be able to push a wheelbarrow thru here. The roots from the Socratea (and they can go 15 ft out from the plant) have effectively blocked off the entrance to Panama Path...

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bgl

And looking up into a canopy of Socratea exorrhizum and Iriartea deltoides. The ones with fruit are the Socrateas.

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bgl

Back out on Caribbean Way, we make a 90 degree left turn, heading north (and towards the street, which is about 440 ft away), and pass by the entrance to Inca Trail

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bgl

And this is it, somewhat hidden, the entrance to Inca Trail, with two more Socrateas to the right and a bunch of misc. Chamaedoreas in the distance.

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bgl

And to the right (and a few leaves just barely visible in the post above) are a bunch of Anthurium hybrids: "Bella Grande" developed by Palms of Paradise in Hilo.

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bgl

And taking just a few more steps and Caribbean Way changes name to New Guinea Place and we are now back in the "Old World", with Corypha utan, Caryota gigas/obtusa, a bunch of Licualas and Heterospathe (on the right).

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bgl

And a few more steps and the driveway to our left (visible in the post above) is Licuala Lane with a canopy of Licuala ramsayi. Clinostigmas (of course!) in the background.

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bgl

Continuing in the same direction, we're soon on Seychelles Court, with five different genera from the Seychelles: Nephrosperma vanhoutteanum, Roscheria melanochaetes, Phoenicophorium borsigianum, Deckenia nobilis and Verschaffeltia splendida. The palms visible in this photo are primarily Nephrosperma (first one on the left), Verschaffeltia (a whole bunch - there are more than 50 in this area) and a handful of Roscherias.

And in case you wonder why the three Lodoiceas aren't planted here, the answer is simple. When I was fortunate to acquire those three seeds in Nov 1999, this area was already planted out. NO WAY I could have squeezed in three Lodoiceas!!

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bgl

And at the end of Seychelles Court, we enter Australian Place, with a few more Licuala ramsayi and a number of Wodyetia and Normanbya palms. None of those are visible in this photo however - these are all Actinorhytis calapparia, and most of them were in 1G pots when planted (in Dec 1998). A very fast growing palm!

The huge palm was sold to me by Palms of Paradise as an Arenga pinnata, but this palm is a double (could have been two seeds I guess), AND with suckers. (Arenga pinnata is supposed to be solitary). It was about 10 ft tall in April 1996 when we planted it. Today it is enormous!

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bgl

At the end of Australian Place, we have to make a choice: Borneo Trail (which would take us back to Seychelles Court) or Sumatra Trail, which is running more or less parallel to Malama Street. We make a left onto Sumatra Trail.

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bgl

And we're now in "Clinostigma cathedral" with dozens of Clinostigma samoense providing a very effective canopy.

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bgl

After walking thru Clinostigma Cathedral, we enter Kerriodoxa Valley (and still on Sumatra Trail) with about two dozen Kerriodoxa elegans.

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bgl

Some time ago, I actually took out our tall extension ladder, put it up against an ohi'a tree and took this photo of Kerriodoxa Valley (didn't have time for the ladder today - this photo is the only one that was NOT taken within the last 3 days).

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bgl

At the end of Sumatra Trail, we find ourselves on Taveuni Trail (Taveuni is the third largest island in Fiji). And I'll have to do something about that Monstera....

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bgl

Looking up to our left, there's a Calamus all the way to the left, the taller single trunked palm is a Ponapea ledermanniana, our largest Johannesteijssmannia altifrons is just above the steps, and to the right of it (and about 15 ft behind) is a group of Iguanura wallichiana.

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bgl

And looking the other direction (which is the direction we're heading in) you can see a number of Areca vestiaria and Areca triandra, Pinangas (difficult to make out) and a tall Clinostigma ponapense. We refer to the "shelter" as our "First bus-stop" (we have a second one as well), even though we have no bus....

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bgl

After passing by the bus-stop, we have Bali Walk on our right: there's a Clinostigma ponapense and Neoveitchia storckii (the two taller palms), a few Heterospathe phillipsii, two monster Salacca magnificas and a handful of Calyptrocalyx pachystachys (the small palms in front of the S. magnifica).

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bgl

And taking a few more steps on Taveuni Trail brings us out on Pacific Drive - the main driveway from Malama Street up to the house. This is the entrance to Taveuni Trail and if you look at Post 41 you can make out the entrance there, even though it's from a different angle. You can also see the Metroxylon salomonense and Orania palindan (one is visible in this photo, to the left). Other palms in this photo: one Clinostigma ponapense to the left of the trail and another one to the right of the trail, plus a number of Physokentia dennisii and P. insolita (both have little stilt roots).

And this concludes the official tour!! On special request from Wal, I'm also going to show where our new plantings are going to be.

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bgl

First a little bit of background: Kamehameha Schools (=KS) and formerly known as Bishop Estate was set up as a foundation in the will of Hawaiian Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop (she was married to an American), and she died in the 1880s. The sole purpose of the foundation is to set up schools and educate children of Hawaiian heritage (and it makes no difference how little Hawaiian blood a potential student has). It's the largest private land owner in the state of Hawaii, and they own 297,000 acres on the Big Island. It is also the richest private school in the entire USA, with assets of about $7 billion. They get their money from leasing out the land they own. It so happens that the land next to us belongs to KS, and we were fortunate to be able to lease it from them (under a long term lease) as of May 2005. The main purpose was for us to set up a palm nursery, but I can also plant all the palms I want. We had a D-9 bulldozer in there in June/July 2005 and cleared out a number of areas. This forest is VERY dense. Decided to save as many of the big ohi'a trees as possible, so we ended up with a lot of "islands" with a number of massive ohi'a trees, and then we cleared out many of the surrounding areas. Here's the entrance from our property to the land owned by KS. (We only put up the field fence and gate last summer after we started having lots of feral pigs come onto our property making a mess...).

Incidentally, the palms in the picture are Raphia taedigera, and there's a total of 20 of them, left and right. Two of them were where the gate is now, and we ended up moving those two so we could build the road.

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bgl

Heading in thru the gate, and making a right turn, we're at the location where all our dead fronds mysteriously end up! (Someone asked me about this). When someone (on one of our garden tours) asked what we did with all our fronds, I used to say "we donate them to Kamehameha Schools". Now, I don't know if that's technically correct, but anyway, there's a LOT of fronds here!!

Incidentally, for those who may not be familiar with Hawaiian history, Kamehameha was the first Hawaiian King, from some time in the 1790s to his death around 1821. He united the Hawaiian islands after centuries of tribal warfare. He was succeeded by Kamehameha I, II, III, IV and V, and then the dynasty died out, and a couple of other Hawaiian monarchs took over.

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bgl

Heading straight in from the gate, this is the first island that we've cleared out. Cut down EVERY single Strawberry guava (plenty!!), but we are leaving the eight massive ohi'a trees. So far I have planted a total of 12 Clinostigma samoense in this island, and some of them ARE visible in this photo. They are about 7 ft tall, so when you locate one (or several) of them, that'll give you an idea of the size of these ohi'a trees.

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bgl

The same "island", a little bit from the left (gate is visible in the distance, sort of in the center of the photo).

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bgl

And looking to our left, the next "island" to be attacked! Have already cut down a number of Strawberry guavas, and every single one will go, plus all the dead ohi'a trees. A few of the Clinostigmas in the first "island" are visible to the right.

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bgl

And this is even more to the left. The "second island" is to our right, and there's actually a driveable path to the left of that "island", so the trees to the left are in yet another "island". That's it for now!! Need a break... :D

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STEVE IN SO CAL

Bo...Talking about dynasties, you've created one yourself. What a great legacy to leave on the earth when you're gone...I'm not trying to rush you off, but it's what strikes me when I see all that you've done. If everyone did SOMETHING to make the world beautiful, we'd be in a good spot.

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bgl

Steve,

Thanks a lot! And I AM planning on sticking around for a L-O-N-G time. For one thing, I need to find out whether I have a male and a female among my three Lodoiceas! :D

And Kris,

I forgot to answer your CIDP question. For one thing, when we moved here from the San Diego area in Southern California in 1995, I was NOT looking to plant Phoenix palms. I had had enough of those in SoCal (even though I really DO appreciate the beauty of many of them, and a well grown CIDP is an amazing sight). I was much more interested in planting tropical palms that would not have grown for me in SoCal. However, as it happens, for some reason, that's not known to me, CIDPs simply don't seem to be available here. I don't believe I have EVER seen a CIDP here on the Hilo side of the island. Not sure about the Kona side (Dean??). At this point, since I have all this open land next to us where I can plant almost an unlimited number of palms, I would certainly plant a group of CIDPs - if I could only find them. (I just bought two dozen Phoenix reclinata seedlings from Floribunda Palms a few months ago).

Bo-Göran

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Kamipalms

Bo, your tour is amazing and how you keep track of your palms must be a mission on its own.

How did you first begin- did you plan all of your gardens or was it random to begin with then the idea of 'zoning' by region came into play?

I'm trying to figure my new backyard on paper and how to landscape it . Most of the garden areas will be raised on a couple of levels with walkways between but it's only a small area ( 12m wide by 35m long) compared to your 'Botanical Garden'

Maybe if I bought a large enough piece of plastic to cover the whole back yard I could create something similar on a smaller scale......

Don't laugh - I've seen it done!

Jason.

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