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bgl

Lundkvist Palm Garden

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bgl

Backtracking a little bit, making a left on Madagascar Drive, and another left onto Pacific Drive, we're back on the main driveway (from the entrance to the house). I have turned around here, so I have the entrance behind me, the first left (narrow red cinder path, the opening between the rockwalls) is Taveuni Trail, and Madagascar Drive is on our right. Sign is visible on the rockwall, but not really legible in this photo. Palms, from left to right: Big palm all the way to the left is a Metroxylon salomonense, then there's a tall trunk and that's a Clinostigna ponapense. Three smaller palms (two on this side of entrance to Taveuni Trail and one just beyond) are Orania palindan. And straight ahead is the New Caledonia section (and the driveway heading off to the left there is New Caledonia Place, while following Pacific Drive and making a slight righ turn will take us to the house - see another photo coming up). Anyway...behind the rockwall that has the Madagascar Drive sign is a group of Bentinckia nicobarica (next photo is better), and then to the immediate right of Madasgacar Drive, a group of Dypsis baronii right on the corner, and to the right of them the palm that was sold as Dypsis amboistrae (now "fine leaf"??).

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bgl

And taking just a few step forward, this photo is for Gileno! Behind the rockwall a few Bentinckia nicobarica. The smaller, somewhat stout, palm in the lower right is a Carpoxylon macrospermum. Pigafetta elata is in the background, towering over everything else!

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bgl

Close-up of the anthuriums just below the Bentinckias.

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bgl

And proceeding up Pacific Drive and making the right turn towards the house. Row of Neoveitchia storckii spaced out 14 ft apart to the right. A bunch of (mainly) Bentinckia nicobarica behind them. And up towards the house, just to the left of the driveway, a Clinostigma samoense, as well as a few smaller N. storckii and also a handful of Kerriodoxa elegans (somewhat difficult to make out).

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osideterry

No time to chat... I gotta get back to work on Gary's Madagascar Calendar.

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ron@springhammock

Let me know when one of those lawn mowing jobs open up!  :D

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quaman58

Bo,

I can now better relate to the time when my kids would go into complete "overload" as we walked through the gates at Disneyland.  :D

Just a magnificent, well planned layout.

Thanks for the tour.

Bret

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PALM MOD

O'side Terry,

That's classic.

I would like to know how you did that. Especially the fold in the middle of the book. Is that a Photo Shop effect?

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bgl

Ron, that could take a while.... - - and Bret, thank you! But the tour is just getting started! :P  And Terry, that's truly amazing! Almost had me fooled there ("I'll have half a dozen of those books..." :D )

More photos in a little while.

Bo-Göran

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bgl

Time to resume the tour! Looking back on Pacific Drive, more or less from where I took the previous photo (post 44), is a group of Cyrtostachys renda. Most of these have been in the ground for 8-10 years, and the tallest one is approaching 30 ft in height. It was about 8 ft tall when planted.

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bgl

Continuing up to the house, this is the view when looking left. All these Clinostigmas were planted in May 1997, exactly ten years ago. The overwhelming majority were about 5 ft tall at that time.

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bgl

And following Pacific Drive, to the right of the house, it now morphs into Atlantic Drive.

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bgl

And this is the view looking down Atlantic Drive, towards the back of our property. All the palms on the left are Roystonea oleracea. On the right, the Madagascar section actually continues about halfway down Atlantic Drive (to where the tall R. oleracea is planted), with a green Bismarckia and quite a few Dypsis lastelliana and other misc. Madagascar palms.

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bgl

Halfway down Atlantic Drive, we make a right onto Amazonas Walk, which is the dividing line between palms from the Americas and palms from Madagascar,

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bgl

A view of Amazonas Walk, which has VERY dense vegetation, palms and as well as many other plants. Obviously Dypsis lutescens on the right....

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bgl

And after a short walk we're at the end of Amazonas Walk, which happens to be at our second bridge. This is a smaller one, only 14 ft long, and this was also built across the crack that runs across our property.

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bgl

Making an immediate right after crossing the bridge, we're now on Pemba Path, which runs parallel to a deep and wide portion of the crack. Apart from the palms, there are also a number of misc. plants that I don't know where they came from. I didn't plant them! The torch ginger in the photo is one of those plants.

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bgl

And a close-up of one of the flowers on the torch ginger plant.

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bgl

And looking straight down from Pemba Path is this 14-15 ft wide hole, which is 20-25 ft deep with completely vertical walls. It's extremely difficult to get a decent photo that does it justice. This is about as good as it gets! And my wife and I call this "our tourist attraction" :)

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bgl

And, looking up instead of down, this is the view: a group of Marojejya darianii, that thrives in this protected location.

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bgl

Exiting at the other end of Pemba Path, we make a left onto Tongan Drive, which is actually a continuation of Madagascar Drive.

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bgl

We had our pavilion built in Aug 1997, 6 months after moving into the house. Great for various events. As a matter of fact, we just had one here yesterday, for a group of 5 visiting Rotarians (members of a Rotary Club), from the Brisbane area (Wal - are you reading this??? ??? ). The team leader was from Goondiwindi and some of the others were from Stanthorphe and the Gold Coast. Garden tour and lunch. Great people and the weather was perfect! (You never know here!!).

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bgl

And just beyond the pavilion, our tallest rockwall, surrounded by Clinostigma samoense and Ravenala madagascariensis. The two Metroxylons are M. warburgii.

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bgl

And right across Tongan Drive is the entrance to Vanuatu Walk, where all (except two!) of our Carpoxylon macrospermum are planted. (The other two were planted along Pacific Drive very early on).

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bgl

Taking a few steps back, the C. macrospermum grove from the "outside". Vanuatu Walk begins just to the right of the C. macrospermum with the more yellow crownshaft.

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bgl

And from the "inside". Last time I took an inventory there were 75 C. macrospermum in this area. I planted a total of 83, but have lost a few for various reasons. For one thing, a tall ohi'a tree fell back in 1999 and wiped out a few!

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bgl

At the other end of Vanuatu Walk, we find ourselves on Metroxylon Avenue - so named for obvious reasons! There are M. amicarum, vitiense and warburgii here, as well as numerous other palms. The group of three Lodoicea maldivica is visible in a distance (somewhat left of center).

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bgl

Getting closer to the three Lodoicea maldivica

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bgl

And a little bit of a close-up of two of the Lodoiceas. The "wall" behind them consists of Dypsis lutescens (left) and Livistona chinensis (right). The tall palms are Clinostigma samoense.

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tim_brissy_13

Awesome shots Bo.  Keep up the good work.

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bgl

Thanks Tim! And forgot to say, that's it for today! Heading off to Hilo in about an hour's time for HIPS' Licuala evening! :)

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Walter John

Excellent tour guidance Bo, to have over 70 well grown Carpoxylons to me is like some place in heaven, is that heaven ?

I chuckle to myself when I see in nearly every "walk" or "drive" there stands yet another Clinostigma samo... er... warbughii (how's that spelt again?). No doubting your pet palm Bo. Amazing amount of work for a truly world class palm garden. I tip my hat and bow, do a backflip and spin on my heel very fast to you.

over 70 ? bloody unreal.

Now here's what I want to see, I want to see your new plantings, just to break the monotony of superbness  :)

We had our pavilion built in Aug 1997, 6 months after moving into the house. Great for various events. As a matter of fact, we just had one here yesterday, for a group of 5 visiting Rotarians (members of a Rotary Club), from the Brisbane area (Wal - are you reading this??? ??? ). The team leader was from Goondiwindi and some of the others were from Stanthorphe and the Gold Coast.

Perhaps instead of the Brisbane area ,you should of said  the South East Queensland area as Gundy and Stanthorpe are quite a few hours drive away from Brissy and the Goldie boys wouldn't want to be classed as in the Brisbane area either, hey Daryl and Newcal  :;):

Thanks Bo. When's Dean's place going to look the same ?

One more question, is it possible for you to obtain any more Lodoiceas ? I think you should to protect this species as they would be in the best of hands for the rest of the world to appreciate. Have you seen the Lodociea group in Darwin ? they are ginormous.

Well that's more than a mouthful from me.

bye

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bgl

Wal,

Thanks a lot for all the feedback! And it was actually the Aussies themselves who mentioned the "Brisbane area" but maybe they only did that for easy reference - Brisbane obviously being the closest city to where they came from that anyone here would be familiar with!

I believe it's C. warburgii. But for the time being I'll stick with C. samoense... :P

Last time I did major plantings on our 5 acres was almost six years ago, so the Polynesian Circle photos is pretty much it! BUT, as I have mentioned in other threads, we have leased the land next to us from Kamehameha Schools (largest private land owner in Hawaii), and I have JUST started to plant a few palms there, so after I'm done with the "tour" I'll throw in a few photos of what a newly planted area looks like!

I don't believe it's possible to acquire Lodoicea seeds from the Seychelles at the present time. At least that's what I've heard. And never been to Darwin. Unfortunately!

Aloha!

Bo-Göran

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Walter John

One day Bo, your "Double Coconuts" will get to this point, here they are in Darwin, whenever I was there, 2 years ago ?, oh I hate getting old.

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PatientPalms

Bo,

As usual, the Lundkvist Garden competes with the best in the world.  Thank you for making your garden available online.  Taking all the photos and posting them here takes a great deal of effort.  The gardens are amazing and walking in that paradise daily must be such a reward for all your labors.  Can't wait to see more pics!   Keep up the good work!

Bill

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madagascarbob

Bo, Thanks for the online tour ,you sound like your more busy than most of us in the rat race(a better kind of busy though).Sorry to add to it but I really appreciate the time you took out of  the last few day's for us,it's the most fun I've had in a long time!Your doing what the rest of us just dream about!I hope you can take time to enjoy the fruits of your labor,I Know we have!

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Kris

Dear Bo Goran  :)

In post no 74 the flowering plants seen are they also called as

devils tongue ?

Dear Terry  :)

that still in post no.43 its fentastic.i think soon when Bo will

be realeasing a book.i think he will get your assistance in

designing that book.great job !

And Dear wal  :)

what is that fan palm you are standing in that still in post no.74 ? since all of you know iam a fan of giant palms...

it did look more like a crypoha or a sabal ? but just a

guess !

And Bo why have you not planted any CIDP's in your Palm

garden..

Thanks & Love,

Kris  :)

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osideterry

Just a quick note on post 43. No filters or effects used. My work for the past 18 years has been mainly in Photoshop. I just dug up two book images, a coffee table, and dropped in two of Bo's photos. Spent my lunch hour "clipping paths", changing perspectives, layering images and and adding gradations were needed (the book spread).

I spent 5 minutes on the book cover itself, maybe less. It would be an honor to spend some real time on a project like this.

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Licuala

Having been at Bo's a little over a month ago, I must agree with Dean that although these photos show an absolutely magnificent garden, they pale to the effect of actually being there.  You can walk around for hours and pass by the same place a dozen times discovering palms you had not seen previously.  

I was there during the biennial in 2004 and in 3 years, the growth has been phenomenal.  I only wish it had been a bit sunnier when I was just there for some better photo taking.  There are few places on earth which can match the climate that Bo has for growing palms.  It is no wonder I am contemplating a move to the Big Island ???

Great Garden Bo!!!!

pablo

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fiji jim

Awesome garden Bo.

Would love to see it one day.

Wish that plants and soil mix etc was as available here in Fiji.

It is much more of a pioneering job and more expensive here. Also every palm being grown from seed as there is not much appreciation for the natural beauty of plants here unless one can eat them.

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