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bgl

Lundkvist Palm Garden

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bgl

Yesterday, Madagascarbob asked me to post more photos, so that gave me an excuse to get some up-to-date shots of various areas of our garden. :)  

I'll post a few now, and will continue tomorrow. Can only cover but so much (and it's getting close to bedtime here!).

Here's our main entrance from Malama Street. A Clinostigma samoense is visible in the upper left, the then there's a Cycas circinalis (and another one on the right hand side of the entrance), a Salacca wallichiana (planted from a 4 inch pot in 1997!), and the smaller palms to the right of it are Pinanga philippinensis. Towering above (and behind) the Salacca are a few more Clinostigmas and Veitchias (difficult to make out). Sort of in the center of the photo (to the right of the driveway) is a trio of Dypsis Orange crush, and to the extreme right is a Dictyosperma. And I should also mention that the tall trees in the background are native ohi'a trees (Metrosideros polymorpha), and we have plenty of those!

Incidentally, I have named all the various drivaways/paths on our property. This is Pacific Drive.

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bgl

Before we head in, here's a look to the left, down Malama Street. The Clinostigma that's just barely visible in the upper left on the previous post, is on the extreme right in this photo. There's obviously a row of Phoenix roebelenii here, behind them is a row of Pinanga coronata (looks like they need to be fertilized...!) and then a row of Clinostigma samoense (now apparently called C. warburgii, but I'll stick with the old name - for now...).

You might ask, why plant P. roebelenii? Well, I needed a small palm that could take full sun and I wanted a whole bunch of them (85 to be exact, because I planted them exactly 3 ft apart) and I didn't want to plant real small stuff (4 inch or 1G size), and P. roebelenii was the only one that was available in quantity and in the appropriate size. Bought all 85 from Kapoho Palms in Aug 1998. They were about 4 ft tall and I paid $12 each, which was pretty reasonable!

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bgl

And heading in thru the main entrance, on Pacific Drive, I decided to make the first right, which is Madagascar Drive. This is looking back where I came from (so I could have the sun in my back when I took the picture!). A few Hyophorbe lagenicaulis, and to the right of them a Pritchardia beccariana. Just to the left of them a trio of Dypsis carlsmithii (but only one is really visible in this photo). In the distance, on the other side of Pacific Drive, an Orania palindan is clearly visible. There's also a bunch of other palms, but they all tend to blend together!

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bgl

The Dypsis carlsmithii in the previous photo is visible in the lower part of this photo. Well, actually, two of them are visible, one on each side of the entrance to Samoan Loop - so named because there's a whole grove of Clinostigma samoense here (visible in the right center) and the 4 taller palms towering over everything else are Pigafetta elata. Palm all the way to the left is a Bentinckia nicobarica.

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eastern.nurseries

Bo, your garden is beautiful and is a credit to your hard work and determination. And your still there.

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bgl

And heading further in on Madagascar Drive, this is the view towards the house. There is a major crack that runs diagonally across our property (30-35 ft deep in some places), formed thru a series of earthquakes, who knows when (but at least several hundred years ago), so we've built this 60 ft long bridge across the crack. The "smaller" palm to the right of the bridge is a Beccariophoenix madagascariensis, and the taller palm above and behind it is a Dypsis lastelliana. The fronds of a number of (smaller) Dypsis leptocheilos are also visible.

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bgl

Jon,

Thank you, and I guess I should point out that I have personally planted every single palm in our garden. Enjoyed every minute of it....

Bo-Göran

OK...heading further back on Madagascar Drive, in this photo the Beccariophoenix madagascariensis that's on the extreme right in the previous photo is now on the extreme left. And two Dypsis nauseosa in the center here, with a Dypsis utilis on the extreme right and also a few Ravenea hildebrandtii.

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bgl

20-25 steps further back, and I now have a view of a couple of Encephalartos ferox on the left, and our tallest Bismarckia nobilis. This was planted from a 25G container in April 1996, and was probably 11-12 years old at the time. It was JUST about to form a trunk at that time. I.e. total age today, approx. 23 years. The two Dypsis nauseosa are visible straight ahead.

(And that's it for tonight - more tomorrow).

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madagascarbob

Wow!You may possibly have one of the best gardens in the world!And you did it all your self it's amazing .I know time flies but didnt you move there about 12 years ago?Seems like just yesterday you were selling your palms in california preparing for the move.Bo I think a you should write a book about it. But that would take time away from your garden, and that would'nt be good.Cant wait for more photo's!AMAZING!

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TikiRick

Bo,

Once again--UNBELIEVABLE garden. I could sit there all day---but I would just want more for myself. Your garden is a true inspiration to the rest of us attempting to accomplish that. I would move to Hilo (or vicinity) tomorrow if I could.....but I think I may suffer socially.

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Mike4284m

Beautiful.  I look forward to more pictures as always.

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Kamipalms

Bo,

It's been said many times before, your garden is absolutely wonderful !

Plus, you have given me some great ideas with your rock walls and colour contrasts between the roads/walls/garden .....

Now, where to find some black stone ....hmmm

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Peter

Bo, I'm glad you showcased those D. nauseosa; they don't get mentioned much but they were one of my favorites in your garden.

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Mats

Thanks for giving us an updated tour of your property Bo.  It's such a treat to see your thriving palms luxuriating in that environment.  It's quite a contrast to the many pictures of tropical palms we see struggling in our So. Cal. Mediterranean climate.  The rate of growth you achieve there is absolutely incredible.  

You've said you planted every palm yourself.  Do you have much natural soil on your property?  I remember someone with property in Puna (Matt?) describing how he brings in large truckloads of soil to fill the holes he carves in the lava.  Can you simply dig your holes with a shovel or are you out there with a jackhammer and blasting caps?

I've got to assume you have hired hands helping with maintenance/cleanup on such a large property.  Do you have a large compost pile hidden back in the Ohi'a forest or are you trucking the old fronds and debris off to a dump?

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MediaHound

(Kamipalms @ May 25 2007,09:39)

QUOTE
Now, where to find some black stone ....hmmm

Bo,

Your garden is amazing! Truly inspirational... kudos!

Kamipalms - look into "feather rock". I get mine locally here in S. Florida, it's shipped from Hawaii into Mississippi via the Panana Canal. The wholesaler is there in Mississippi, then on from there to down here to the place where I get mine. Dare I post photos of mine here in this thread and take away the ambiance, but they are beautiful black rocks - very sharp edges though! I wish I had more info for you about the company that's shipping them, I can look into it but not sure if my place will disclose their source to me because I'm always there buying more! All they told me is where they're shipped in from...

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DoomsDave

Bo!

More pictures!

Swooning sofa's so beat up, I'm just gonna use the floor . . .

dave

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Exotic Life

Beautifull yard!

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Kim

I can look at photos of your garden over and over and never tire of it.  I have some of the same questions as Mats.  I wondered if you used heavy equipment to dig trenches when planting, for example, the rows of P. roebeleniis, Pinanga coronatas and Clinostigma samoense?

And what is the flowering plant in the rock planters at the entrance?  I'm thinking anthurim, but can't quite make it out.

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Kris

Dear Bo Goran  :)

that garden looks like we are in the middle of the rainforest,

like brazil or malaysia...

and iam very happy this time ? since there was also a still of my favouriate fan palm_Bizie Lady(Special thanks for that one)

and that drive way and its entrance is totally out of the world

experience.and as jon said you have soiled & toiled for that

effect and you are living in it_Wow.since all are not blessed to

live their lives in a palm nursery kind of enverinoment.since

even nursery folks have their place of residence elsewhere.

As dave said the desire to see more has been kindeled

i hope you will satisfy it !  :D

Thanks & Love,

Kris  :)

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Don Little

Bo

Once again such an inspiration for all palm growers no matter how long they have been doing this.  Thanks again for the photos

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mike453

Thanks for the updated photos Bo, Beautiful as always!

                    Best regards, Mike

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bgl

Wow, everybody, thanks for your comments!  :) And questions! Before I post any more photos, let my try to answer the various questions:

We bought the initial 3 acres in Feb 1996, and I planted the first palms in late March 1996, so everything on the property has been planted in these 11 years. The "heavy" planting years were 1997, 1998 and 1999 and I planted between 1000 and 1200 palms in each of those three years.

There is hardly ANY soil here in this area, maybe just a thin layer of 2-3 inches, so we had to bring in numerous truckloads of a cinder-soil mix. At that time, there was a cinderpit very close to us (well, it's still there, but it's been closed since 2001...!), and every single palm has been planted in that mix. The mix is naturally occurring, and a truckload of 26 cubic yards was right around $125-$150. Today, this really excellent mix isn't even available and substitute cinder-soil mix (for 26 cubic yards) is in the $400-$500 price range. We only used a jackhammer ONCE, and that was when I wanted to plant seven Neoveitchia storckii along the driveway, and I wanted them EXACTLY 14 ft apart. Other than that, I have tried to use the terrain & topography to my advantage. There are lots of little ups and downs as you walk thru the forest here, so when I planted most of the palms, I would look for a little depression, try to dig down just a little bit (usually an exercise in futility), then simply put the palm there and fill up with cinder-soil. In some places I had to mound up a little bit. For instance, the tall Bismarckia was planted in such a way: I had to mound up around it by about a foot. When we acquired the last (and 5th) acre in June 2001, we cleared out all the invasive stuff (primarily Strawberry guava and Tibouchina) with a D9 bulldozer, and then brought in truckload after truckload of the cinder-soil mix and simply spread it out. That was in Aug 2001, and the company that delivered all the cinder-soil was Bryson's Cinders in Pahoa. The next month, Sep 2001, they lost the lease to the cinder-pit, and access to this great stuff ended abruptly. By that time we had taken delivery of 44 truckloads and spread out all those truckloads on our "5th acre". Talk about being lucky.... I'm going to post some photos from this area shortly, and we have a circular "driveway" here, which we have named Polynesian Circle. The cinder-soil in this area is about 2-3 ft deep, and it really shows in the palms that are planted here. MUCH faster than in other areas. And when the P. roebelenii, P. coronata and C. samoense were planted out front along the street, those holes were all dug by hand.

The red plants out front, by the entrance, are indeed Anthuriums. These are great plants if you want color: 1) one plant will maintain color for something like 6 weeks at a time, and 2) they have color ALL YEAR round. I'll sneak in a few photos of anthuriums later today....

We do have help; two guys come in a couple of days a week (for a total of about 23-24 hours/week) and they mow the grass and do general maintenance such as remove all the old fronds (a BIG job!!). One of them has been with us since Jan 1998 so he's actually learned quite a bit about the palms, and their names, which is very useful. And talking about old fronds, we do take them to a special location, behind our property, and when I get to that point I'll even take a photo of that, and explain a little bit more.

I think I've covered all the questions. :)  More photos soon....

Bo-Göran

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bgl

OK, resuming the tour...: continuing from Madagascar Drive, and making the first right hand turn takes us out to Polynesian Circle. This is the acre we acquired in June 2001, so most of the palms here were planted around Aug/Sep 2001, after we had cleared it out and brought in the cinder-soil mix (see post above). This is a group of Dypsis sp. bejofa (sold under incorrect name Dypsis bejofo). These were all in 3G pots, about 2 ft tall at the time. Reasonably fast growers. There are a total of 24 in this group.

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bgl

Heading west (counter clockwise), two Metroxylon amicarum, with a group of Cyrtostachys renda a little bit behind them (these are on the "outside" of the circle). The Metroxylons were planted from 1G pots in 1999, but in a different location (since we didn't have this acre in 1999!), and I moved them to their present location in Aug 2001 and Dec 2001, and they were both about 6 ft tall at that time. Pretty fast growers!

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bgl

And more of less from the same spot, this is looking "in", towards the center of the circle: a group of Neoveitchia storckii. The taller ones came from Hawaii Palm Company in July 2001, and they were in 25G pots, so nice size when planted, but no trunk at that time. Moderately fast growers.

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bgl

And heading north (that's heading left from where the previous photo was taken): this is the northwest ("outside") corner of Polynesian Circle; a number of taller Clinostigma samoense, with a row of Dypsis lutescens to the right of them (they are on the inside of the rockwall along Malama Street), and behind them and to the left a bunch of Areca vestiaria. The cycad sort of in the lower part of the photo (center) is an Encephalartos laurentianus, and behind and to the right of it is a group of smaller Lemuropohoenix halleuxii. These palms do NOT like to be out in full sun when smaller. Takes them several years to adjust and look reasonably good, and I have lost a few smaller ones. To the left of the cycad are a couple of Cyrtostachys sp. (NOT renda), and the small pathetic looking palm is probably dead at this point. Need to get it out of there.... The two palms to the left with the very visible trunks are Ponapea ledermanniana.

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bgl

And the last one for now, and the last one from Polynesian Circle: continuing in the same direction and now facing east, a group of Dypsis carlsmithii (about 20 individuals in this group) with a few Bismarckia nobilis in the distance (close-up coming up...). Unfortunately, when we had the D-9 bulldozer clear out this area, we must have damaged a number of the ohi'a roots, because a number of these trees have lost all their leaves over the last several years, and are now presumably dead. So, we need to remove them. That won't be cheap....

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deezpalms

Great shots of your garden Bo as always. I can never see too much of your garden. A true paradise!! Mahalo bradah Bo!!

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osideterry

Unreal. Maybe "the book" could be a huge coffee table book. You could probably start taking preorders right now from everyone on this forum.

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ania

It is one increadible place you have created there, Bo. I have seen most of the gardens of Hawaii, like Foster's and Ho'omaluhia, but yours is truly spectacular one. Foster's palm section doesn't even come close to yours.

I can't wait to tour it one day.

Ania

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BigFrond

Very impressive as always Bo!  What I'm really waiting for is the pictures of your fruiting Lodoicea maldivica. :D

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Dypsisdean

I would like to hope that everyone realizes that as nice and impressive as looking through these photos and commentary is, it doesn't come close to walking through and taking the tour with the always gracious host. The photos can't even come close to showing the size, and giving you the feel, of a truly remarkable garden.

I have been forunate to have visited five or six times, and have come no where close to noticing everything. I enjoy taking seasoned palm enthusiasts there, just to watch their eyes glaze over after the first ten minutes of what amounts to a 2 hour tour.

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Gtlevine

I remember it like yesterday. The thing I don't remember is the clear blue skys I see in these latest pics, when I was there it rained every day and night. Gives me a good reason to return.

Gary

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madagascarbob

(osideterry @ May 25 2007,13:58)

QUOTE
Unreal. Maybe "the book" could be a huge coffee table book. You could probably start taking preorders right now from everyone on this forum.

As an art director osideterry ,you could whip one  up pretty quick! :P

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JakeK

Bo, why you gotta post these pics man, giving us all serious fits of envy. You're brutal.  :;):

Like always, the place looks great. Enjoy the long weekend & holiday in paradise!!!

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Alicehunter2000

And remember, Bo does this while tracking every single airplane flight in the world (right Bo?). Your a machine :)

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Gileno Machado

Wow...everytime I see these pictures I get more and more ideas...Palm paradisiac gardens do exist !!

Btw, Bo, now I understand your special love for Clinostigmas, as my seedlings here are rapidly showing their marvelous and distinct elegance too. There are two other palm genera that I have been growing from seed (still small) that you mention but I don't sense much your enthusiasm for them, and I had great hopes here myself: Rhopaloblaste and Bentinckia. I'd appreciate to read your comments about these palms too and their performance and looks, since i had plans to try them on special spots in the ground too and now I'm tempted to expand the Clinostigma small grove, like in your garden and at O'homaluia pictures I've seen.

Thanks in advance.

PS: Where are those incredible looking Attalea, Socratea and Iriarteas? Did you plant the South American section all at the same time? How do you estimate the hybridization is occuring at the moment in so many mature species in this lovely garden?

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bgl

Wow, again, thanks for all your comments. And where do I begin...!? ???  

Everybody here on the Forum obviously is welcome to stop by for a garden tour,  but Ania, as you know, you have a special open invitation whenever you're able to make it (which I hope will be soon). And Gary, the weather has been fairly dry recently. And June is (on average) the driest month of the year. And it's been almost six months since your visit here... :D

Dean, I don't know if I ever told you, but the very first time you were here was the longest garden tour EVER -I believe it took us about 3.5 hours! And don't get me wrong, that was GREAT! I enjoy it immensely (as I know you know) when knowledgeable people visit. I need all the help I can get with these darn Dypsis... :D

Jake, actually I had no intention of starting this thread with these photos since I posted a bunch of garden photos last year, and it doesn't seem like there's anything new here to show. I'm blaming madagascarbob. He made me do it! :D

Gileno, Bentinckias coming right up.... And the South American section is behind the house. It'll take me a while get there at this pace! And when it comes to hybridization, I have no idea what will happen! We'll just have to wait and see!

Oh, and BigFrond, the fruiting Lodoicea is probably 30 years down the road...In the meantime I'm simply enjoying the fact that they thrive here!

OK, let's proceed. After walking past the grove of Dypsis carlsmithii, I make a left turn onto a more narrow red cinder path, named Masoala Trail.

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bgl

And within a few feet there's a group (5, to be exact) of Bismarckia nobilis. Can't get a good shot of the whole group, but here are two of them.

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bgl

And heading up to our right on Masoala Trail, in the direction of Madagascar Drive, this is the view: A few Marojejya darianii.

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