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Rhopalostylis Sapida in Habitat, New Zealand

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Jeff Searle

Great habitat pictures, thanks for sharing!

Jeff

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sipalms
On 6/7/2019 at 9:59 PM, cbmnz said:

I'm unsure whether I got it right to draw that spur of range down to Kaikoura. There definitely are Nikau in the Malbough Sounds rainforest. I don't know if the wide Wairau valley is the end of them though, of if any occupy the shady creek gullies along the Kaikoura coast.

 

News flash - I have spent some time in Kaikoura recently and can confirm there are pockets of nikau along the Kaikoura coast in the rainforest, some of which are visible from State highway 1. This includes south of Kaikoura as well, however the lowland forest suddenly changes to drier manuka forest from Oaro onwards further south.

I wonder why these aren't as common on the east coast? Could be to do with substantially lower rainfall than their West coast counterparts. 

It would be interesting to compare the Kaikoura form to the Banks Peninsula form to see if they look similar. 

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Tyrone
33 minutes ago, sipalms said:

News flash - I have spent some time in Kaikoura recently and can confirm there are pockets of nikau along the Kaikoura coast in the rainforest, some of which are visible from State highway 1. This includes south of Kaikoura as well, however the lowland forest suddenly changes to drier manuka forest from Oaro onwards further south.

I wonder why these aren't as common on the east coast? Could be to do with substantially lower rainfall than their West coast counterparts. 

It would be interesting to compare the Kaikoura form to the Banks Peninsula form to see if they look similar. 

Yes, yes do that. I never get sick of seeing Nikaus in habitat.

Send me seeds if you want too as well. Lol

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cbmnz
1 hour ago, sipalms said:

News flash - I have spent some time in Kaikoura recently and can confirm there are pockets of nikau along the Kaikoura coast in the rainforest, some of which are visible from State highway 1. This includes south of Kaikoura as well, however the lowland forest suddenly changes to drier manuka forest from Oaro onwards further south.

I wonder why these aren't as common on the east coast? Could be to do with substantially lower rainfall than their West coast counterparts. 

It would be interesting to compare the Kaikoura form to the Banks Peninsula form to see if they look similar. 

Thanks, that's very interesting to know. 

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Dave-Vero

In my brief visit to Christchurch several years ago, I heard lots of complaints about the dry climate and erratic cold.  The lusher vegetation on the west side of the Southern Alps was obvious to a newbie like me.  So I guess the question is, how are they managing to grow on the east coast? 

It was great seeing the photos again.  I'm fresh back from London, where Kew had a few NZ plants in the big Temperate House, where they'd replaced almost everything in recent years.   When I lived in Portland, Oregon, people tried growing Hebe bushes from NZ, but they didn't seem to like the dry summers, and maybe the winters were too cold, also.  It was certainly no place for nikau.  

I'm still amazed at the Hamilton Garden with its multiple gardens in international styles (and plants).  It's the sort of thing that could be done in the right corner of southern California, with enough irrigation water, or possibly somewhere near Taipei, which has a combination of cool winter weather/no frost, so that temperate and tropical plants can be grown together.  Here in central Florida, a lot of temperate garden plants die of excess heat in the winter, while tropicals periodically get frozen.  Montane tropicals don't like the heat.   Disney in Orlando, Florida does a gallant effort at making its theme park plants interesting (lots of great palms and cycads), but the climate doesn't make things easy.  By the way, they are shut down for at least a couple of weeks due to The Virus.   

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sipalms
7 hours ago, Dave-Vero said:

In my brief visit to Christchurch several years ago, I heard lots of complaints about the dry climate and erratic cold.  The lusher vegetation on the west side of the Southern Alps was obvious to a newbie like me.  So I guess the question is, how are they managing to grow on the east coast? 

Well you're definitely not wrong there. Christchurch city gets 25"/640mm annually, and cold snaps are fickle, but just not cold enough to outright kill a lot of semi-subtropical palms. However, the nearby Nikau palm groves in places like Banks Peninsula and Kaikoura are essentially freeze-free due to their proximity to the sea, and typically sheltered gullies away from cold traps. And both locations would get substantially more rainfall due to proximity to the ocean.

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realarch

Jeremy, thanks for the photos and commentary. A few years back we traveled to Greymouth and was in heaven seeing the palm forest of R. sapida.  Just so spectacular, especially arriving toward

the end of the day with the palms glowing in the sunset.

It was also interesting to see the growth habit of understory palms in your photos. Thanks again for posting.

Tim

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sipalms
On 3/16/2020 at 9:00 AM, realarch said:

Jeremy, thanks for the photos and commentary. A few years back we traveled to Greymouth and was in heaven seeing the palm forest of R. sapida.  Just so spectacular, especially arriving toward the end of the day with the palms glowing in the sunset.

For those interested in a palmy experience, you can do a walk through of the Truman track at Punakaiki.... https://www.google.co.nz/maps/@-42.0942622,171.3434338,3a,90y,82.94h,96.61t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sG2DW5Jx3ih_ydnquP6695g!2e0!5s20091201T000000!7i13312!8i6656 , although as per photos in this thread it is not very clear and doesn't show the palmiest spots in the forest.

Here's another interesting read on the Nikau palm; https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/nikau-the-kiwi-palm/

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sipalms

Many of these photos will be similar to the ones originally posted. But I was in Punakaiki yesterday and thought I'd get some pics, along with some seedlings to raise for my landscaping project...

Some of these photos are blurry due to resizing - but they are all 100% unedited (no filters... in case you were wondering about the colours!)

Your classic Kiwi coastal bungalow:20200318_114422.thumb.jpg.c030b59e07214a56a0a0dafdfc7a5c47.jpg

These things grow anywhere including in cracks in cliffs.20200318_114500.thumb.jpg.b7eda35c4771157473619b9be804ee79.jpg

 

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These were in a cavern right by the sea...

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Flowering had just begun, but no fresh seeds yet.

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After talking with a local conservationist nearby, who agreed (under the radar!) that I could gather some seedlings for personal use only (it is supposedly illegal to take seedlings). But regardless I gathered about seven healthy seedlings, as well as some big ones that came free (taproots intact) out of gravel type material. These were all ones directly beneath parent plants that would have had very little chance of survival to maturity. Then, back on the east coast later that day potted them up for use around my landscape project. 

 

20200318_180408.thumb.jpg.f88e237d0b6c272b8fd568f90e6c779b.jpg

This is my Pitt Island one which came directly from Pitt Island and has been growing happily in ground ever since.

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Edited by sipalms
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Stevetoad
1 hour ago, sipalms said:

Many of these photos will be similar to the ones originally posted. But I was in Punakaiki yesterday and thought I'd get some pics, along with some seedlings to raise for my landscaping project...

Some of these photos are blurry due to resizing - but they are all 100% unedited (no filters... in case you were wondering about the colours!)

Your classic Kiwi coastal bungalow:20200318_114422.thumb.jpg.c030b59e07214a56a0a0dafdfc7a5c47.jpg

These things grow anywhere including in cracks in cliffs.20200318_114500.thumb.jpg.b7eda35c4771157473619b9be804ee79.jpg

 

20200318_121809.thumb.jpg.003bcc6d72216b7c91b52952cafd7932.jpg20200318_122606.thumb.jpg.226e37d269c542726a75e8e7cc850c90.jpg

 

20200318_114618.thumb.jpg.0a48b01a1d02d3968c1d861727ddfea2.jpg

 

20200318_120616.thumb.jpg.7f64334d8b6d2520ccd5e6f6095165c5.jpg

 

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20200318_121019.thumb.jpg.a0d281988156e36f172706df55514ed6.jpg

 

These were in a cavern right by the sea...

20200318_122022.thumb.jpg.5921af73acdacbd0cda48ef7e205169b.jpg

 

20200318_122145.thumb.jpg.af0e051341266455fb5a7bd0ba530111.jpg

 

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Flowering had just begun, but no fresh seeds yet.

20200318_121254.thumb.jpg.9ea4256945b8737e320f333302ba4255.jpg

 

20200318_121258.thumb.jpg.0efdd802d15f878ca46d158c4b7b9016.jpg

 

After talking with a local conservationist nearby, who agreed (under the radar!) that I could gather some seedlings for personal use only (it is supposedly illegal to take seedlings). But regardless I gathered about seven healthy seedlings, as well as some big ones that came free (taproots intact) out of gravel type material. These were all ones directly beneath parent plants that would have had very little chance of survival to maturity. Then, back on the east coast later that day potted them up for use around my landscape project. 

 

20200318_180408.thumb.jpg.f88e237d0b6c272b8fd568f90e6c779b.jpg

This is my Pitt Island one which came directly from Pitt Island and has been growing happily in ground ever since.

20200318_180706.thumb.jpg.444d02002f4a2401e0e52c0e713f0c65.jpg

20200318_122153.jpg

20200318_122307.jpg

20200318_123730.jpg

 

 

20200318_180837.jpg

 

Great shots! Place is beautiful!

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David York

Stunning pictures of Nikaus, really enjoyed seeing them. I just love this species and I wish you could contribute to the EPS forum. I'm sure you would be well appreciated with regards to this species.

Thanks for the amazing pictures.

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sipalms

Bumping this thread...

I'm heading up the east coast / Kaikoura direction later this week for work, and will see what I can find with what time I have, in the way of natural Rhopalostylis population along the east coast. As per earlier in this thread, I was up that way a few months back and saw the odd Nikau poking up through the thick rainforest by the coast and SH1, so will be interesting to investigate further if possible.

There's talk of a one off, really old Nikau in the bush nearby; http://www.stuff.co.nz/marlborough-express/news/kaikoura/3685723/Fence-protects-giant-totara-from-damage maybe a good spot to get some seed of what will likely be a very hardy tree.

On 3/20/2020 at 6:26 AM, David York said:

Stunning pictures of Nikaus, really enjoyed seeing them. I just love this species and I wish you could contribute to the EPS forum. I'm sure you would be well appreciated with regards to this species.

Thanks for the amazing pictures.

I'll have to check it... I assume you mean http://www.palmsociety.org.uk/forum/ ? 

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Tyrone
18 hours ago, sipalms said:

Bumping this thread...

I'm heading up the east coast / Kaikoura direction later this week for work, and will see what I can find with what time I have, in the way of natural Rhopalostylis population along the east coast. As per earlier in this thread, I was up that way a few months back and saw the odd Nikau poking up through the thick rainforest by the coast and SH1, so will be interesting to investigate further if possible.

There's talk of a one off, really old Nikau in the bush nearby; http://www.stuff.co.nz/marlborough-express/news/kaikoura/3685723/Fence-protects-giant-totara-from-damage maybe a good spot to get some seed of what will likely be a very hardy tree.

I'll have to check it... I assume you mean http://www.palmsociety.org.uk/forum/ ? 

Would love to see pics. 

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sipalms

So, I found a decent natural stand of Nikau just north of Kaikoura. (Refer to blue dot)

Screenshot_20200821-215046_Maps.thumb.jpg.42030f64827858f4a5c09796883f6add.jpg

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The Nikau this far south must be pretty rare because this stand was very difficult to spot.

Here's the approx location, the sea fog was rolling in. You can see the start of the Seaward Kaikoura mountains on the right.

Screenshot_20200821-222553_Photos.thumb.jpg.2cfc9e2d4b0a65440ad7b576dade5dc0.jpg

From highway, I just spotted a couple poking out of thick coastal rainforest so decided to explore.

Screenshot_20200821-222454_Photos.thumb.jpg.732d370bfc43425a3b839f0e8bc413f1.jpg

Once under the canopy, I was met with the usual forest floor full of seedlings, before venturing further up to find several large parent trees.

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sipalms

I'm convinced these are some form of East coast NZ Nikau?! They actually look different to the West Coast ones on the other side of the island. The crownshaft is a real unique green, almost blue-green / teal. They actually reminded me a lot of hedyscepe canterburyana.

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These definitely appear different to Chatham Island form. Perhaps I'm looking into it too much but they do have a unique look. I can't wait to compare to the Banks Peninsula variety which may well be the same.

I couldn't find any fresh seed, so instead 'borrowed' a few seedlings and potted them up to raise at home. I'll be watching and comparing these to their west coast counterparts as they grow.

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There are also Nikau south of Kaikoura but I didn't have time to explore.

Screenshot_20200821-224654_Maps.thumb.jpg.1c8d36e0fff63794d641ee747442496f.jpg

The rainforest where these are, is very coastal, restricted to tiny gullies just above the sea. Wouldn't it be great to hire a boat one day and see just how far south these actually occur down this coast. There's no reason why they wouldn't be amongst coastal forest around Cheviot even.

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cbmnz

Very interesting. Long wondered if the Wairau valley was a natural boundary where Nikau stopped, the known grove on banks penisular exempted.

Glad I'm not the only one who bashes through untracked bush to find Nikau in marginal places. I make an effort not to get lost as saves having to explain why was out there!

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sipalms
3 minutes ago, cbmnz said:

Very interesting. Long wondered if the Wairau valley was a natural boundary where Nikau stopped, the known grove on banks penisular exempted.

Exactly, south of the Wairau valley is very arid, in vineyard country, right to the coast. There's actually agaves naturalizing along the roadsides by the sea, it reminds me a lot of SoCal coast around Camp Pendleton for some reason.

3 minutes ago, cbmnz said:

Glad I'm not the only one who bashes through untracked bush to find Nikau in marginal places. I make an effort not to get lost as saves having to explain why was out there!

Please don't ask me to explain more... but I won't share pics of what else was up there further up this steep gully..... I got the fright of my life after finding traces of human activity (undersized paua shells and a washed out campfire/pans for a start) followed by illicit power supply line further up, and the rest we shall leave there!

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cbmnz
4 minutes ago, sipalms said:

Exactly, south of the Wairau valley is very arid, in vineyard country, right to the coast. There's actually agaves naturalizing along the roadsides by the sea, it reminds me a lot of SoCal coast around Camp Pendleton for some reason.

Please don't ask me to explain more... but I won't share pics of what else was up there further up this steep gully..... I got the fright of my life after finding traces of human activity (undersized paua shells and a washed out campfire/pans for a start) followed by illicit power supply line further up, and the rest we shall leave there!

Have had one or two simillar experiences, not specifically when exploring for Nikau though.  Take it no natural ones in the Tweedies Gully area at Gore Bay?

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sipalms
2 minutes ago, cbmnz said:

Have had one or two simillar experiences, not specifically when exploring for Nikau though.  Take it no natural ones in the Tweedies Gully area at Gore Bay?

I should say, the power supply was probably solar... To give the benefit of the doubt.

Good point, I'll have to take a look. I've never been up Tweedies Gully. There's a couple of big old Nikau in Gore Bay itself, but may not be naturally occurring. I haven't seen them in Cathedral Gully, which is the same patch of bush by the looks.

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doubravsky

beautiful pics.. thanks for sharing! 

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Tyrone

Thanks for these pics. I just love Rhopalostylis. Those ones do appear to have a blue tinge to the crown shaft. I hope your seedlings will kick on to be magnificent specimens in your collection.

A couple of years ago I came across a local succulent nursery with some magnificent trunking Nikaus. Any way I asked if I could have a few seeds and the owner got out a saw and cut 3 big infructenses off!!! Way more than I needed or expected. I didn’t waste a seed and cleaned them all and even planted the green ones. I germinated them outside in 4 big clear plastic storage bins. I didn’t bother counting the seed. I assumed I had around 2000 seed. Anyway they all came up. This winter I started potting them up. The first box gave me 993 plants!!! I’ve got 2/3 of the way through the second box and I’m at 1593!!! I’ve got over 2 boxes to go but I’m out of pots. I estimate when I’m done I will have 3500-4000 nikaus!!! 

Lucky I’m on acreage. I’m going to jam a nikau in anywhere it can fit now.

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sipalms
13 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

Thanks for these pics. I just love Rhopalostylis. Those ones do appear to have a blue tinge to the crown shaft. I hope your seedlings will kick on to be magnificent specimens in your collection.

A couple of years ago I came across a local succulent nursery with some magnificent trunking Nikaus. Any way I asked if I could have a few seeds and the owner got out a saw and cut 3 big infructenses off!!! Way more than I needed or expected. I didn’t waste a seed and cleaned them all and even planted the green ones. I germinated them outside in 4 big clear plastic storage bins. I didn’t bother counting the seed. I assumed I had around 2000 seed. Anyway they all came up. This winter I started potting them up. The first box gave me 993 plants!!! I’ve got 2/3 of the way through the second box and I’m at 1593!!! I’ve got over 2 boxes to go but I’m out of pots. I estimate when I’m done I will have 3500-4000 nikaus!!! 

Lucky I’m on acreage. I’m going to jam a nikau in anywhere it can fit now.

No way.... That would be a sight to behold in 10- 15 years!

What method did you use to germinate them? Just as you say, chuck em in a clear box outside? Wouldn't they get too warm?

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sipalms

20200821_130649.thumb.jpg.0770e23dbf3984ada8b265274af8bdd2.jpg

I love the big weeping fronds on these when they're under canopy. Look like howea.

One of the local housing estates has a good use of palms throughout, combined with large Norfolk Is. Pines, giving a subtropical feel, even though there is semi-permanent snowfields on the Alps in the background! I saw some bangalows growing in one of the back yards as well.

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Last four pics Source https://www.oceanridge.co.nz/gallery/ (since it was terrible weather yesterday)

Edited by sipalms
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Tyrone
3 hours ago, sipalms said:

No way.... That would be a sight to behold in 10- 15 years!

What method did you use to germinate them? Just as you say, chuck em in a clear box outside? Wouldn't they get too warm?

Open lid in the shade with drain holes in the bottom. They stay cool and moist due to the shade, rain, and irrigation in summer.

In 10-15 years it should look good. I’m trying to create tonnes of canopy now for them.

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cbmnz
6 hours ago, sipalms said:

20200821_130649.thumb.jpg.0770e23dbf3984ada8b265274af8bdd2.jpg

I love the big weeping fronds on these when they're under canopy. Look like howea.

One of the local housing estates has a good use of palms throughout, combined with large Norfolk Is. Pines, giving a subtropical feel, even though there is semi-permanent snowfields on the Alps in the background! I saw some bangalows growing in one of the back yards as well.

20200821_145304.thumb.jpg.aec04903ffdcb530c6f9d0d6a151b1e5.jpg

20200821_145254.jpg

170827-ocean-ridge-74295.thumb.jpg.5d4f792a294fef9636b1381639f9e666.jpg

170827-ocean-ridge-74195.thumb.jpg.20880da51ee8ff0d49df1a4d52186356.jpg

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2006-060507May0087.thumb.jpeg.2d7f1d9640418d24424272e1e4f388b0.jpeg

Last four pics Source https://www.oceanridge.co.nz/gallery/ (since it was terrible weather yesterday)

Not sure why most sites list Norfolk Pine as being USDA zone 10 and 11 only.  They seem to easily grow in 9A zones in NZ, and presumably Australia too.

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palmfriend

Great documentation - very interesting!!

Thank you very much for sharing!

best regards from Okinawa -

Lars

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sandgroper

What a stunningly beautiful country you live in, New Zealand really is incredible mate. Those nikau palms just look fantastic, they've got to be one of the best looking palms there is in my opinion.

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sipalms
40 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

What a stunningly beautiful country you live in, New Zealand really is incredible mate. Those nikau palms just look fantastic, they've got to be one of the best looking palms there is in my opinion.

Cheers, I would readily say the same about Australia.

I also reckon they are one of the best looking, especially under canopy. Once they break the canopy they just change altogether.

I'm no scientist but I could ponder for hours, just how these things occur all up and down the country in various forms, and how they have survived previous cold periods. They seem to have such unique climate demands as well. Not too hot, definitely no cold etc.

Next weekend the Banks Peninsula Nikau Gully  track will open for the season. I think I'm definitely going to have to explore...

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Tyrone
18 hours ago, cbmnz said:

Not sure why most sites list Norfolk Pine as being USDA zone 10 and 11 only.  They seem to easily grow in 9A zones in NZ, and presumably Australia too.

I think you are right about the Norfolk Island Pine. They are tough. I’ve got one here in the sheep paddock that a previous owner planted and it has no protection and handles all the frost you can get here. I know it saw minus 2.5C last month and it’s just pushing out new growth. It didn’t even notice it. The same with the Bunya pine. You see old specimens in some very cold parts of inland southern WA that must see a minus 3 or 4 every now and again.

NZ looks absolutely stunning. When this covid thing is over I want to cross the Tasman and take a look for myself.

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PalmCode

Looks like there might be a Kauri - Agathis Australis growing there in one of those last photos as well. That's awesome if it is one.

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sipalms
3 hours ago, PalmCode said:

Looks like there might be a Kauri - Agathis Australis growing there in one of those last photos as well. That's awesome if it is one.

Believe it or not, people are planting Kauri in their gardens in suburban Christchurch. They are for sale at some nurseries. There's a reasonable sized one not far from where I live, it looks a bit orange in winter but ends up looking great by the end of summer. Bizarre!

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Tyrone
53 minutes ago, sipalms said:

Believe it or not, people are planting Kauri in their gardens in suburban Christchurch. They are for sale at some nurseries. There's a reasonable sized one not far from where I live, it looks a bit orange in winter but ends up looking great by the end of summer. Bizarre!

I got Agathis australis seeds in once but not one came up. If I could get a few going here I’d be happy. I need to get myself to NZ I think. The land of the long white cloud is calling. 

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sipalms
On 6/6/2019 at 10:44 PM, cbmnz said:

From my travels and observations, here is a rough range of where R.Sapida occur naturally in NZ. Anywhere in the yellow zone, where you find surviving rainforest- even small fragments, R. Sapida/Nikau dominate the under story.

I live quite close to the yellow/red boundary in North Island, on a forested peak about 25km South of here called Maugatautari, there are plenty in the understory of the bush, up to ~650m elevation. Yet another 50km or so South in the Pureora Forest, I've seen none, even in lowest/wettest parts of the bush there. 

 

R-Sapida-Range-South-and-Chat.png

R-Sapia-Range-North.png

@cbmnz, A question for you, have you deliberately left the Far North / North Cape / Cape Reinga off the yellow zone? Do Nikau Palms not occur naturally up that far north?

I was up there last year, the vegetation is very subtropical and palms are aplenty, but I can't recall whether Nikau were there or not.

Edited by sipalms

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UK_Palms
On 8/22/2020 at 7:49 AM, cbmnz said:

Not sure why most sites list Norfolk Pine as being USDA zone 10 and 11 only.  They seem to easily grow in 9A zones in NZ, and presumably Australia too.

There's some big Norfolk Pine specimens on Tresco over here as well at 50N. I think Tresco is a 10b zone most years though (lowest last winter was +3.8C). I'm not sure if there's any 'big' specimens on the UK mainland. Maybe around Cornwall, Devon and London? Or perhaps the south coast of Ireland? I'm sure there's a few dotted about in mild, protected areas, besides Tresco.

Apparently they get killed off in northern Florida though which is 8b - 9a. I think you need to go a bit below Daytona Beach before you can start growing them over there, in which case it will be 10a zones where you can start growing them. You'll need someone from the States to verify that though...

52679.jpg

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PalmCode
11 hours ago, Tyrone said:

I got Agathis australis seeds in once but not one came up. If I could get a few going here I’d be happy. I need to get myself to NZ I think. The land of the long white cloud is calling. 

That's great to hear, I never knew they would grow down there. Just assumed it would be a bit too cold for them in the winter.

 

11 hours ago, Tyrone said:

I got Agathis australis seeds in once but not one came up. If I could get a few going here I’d be happy. I need to get myself to NZ I think. The land of the long white cloud is calling. 

That's a shame... They're easy as if fresh. Late march / April is when the seeds fall. Then It can only take a week or two for them to come up when put in soil!

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Tyrone
31 minutes ago, PalmCode said:

That's great to hear, I never knew they would grow down there. Just assumed it would be a bit too cold for them in the winter.

 

That's a shame... They're easy as if fresh. Late march / April is when the seeds fall. Then It can only take a week or two for them to come up when put in soil!

I think the freshness was the issue. The seed had likely travelled all around the world before I got them. Oh well. Will need to find a fresher source next time.

As for Norfolk Island Pines they’re everywhere down here. Middleton Beach is lined with them. Back in the Victorian era they were planted everywhere.

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cbmnz
17 hours ago, sipalms said:

@cbmnz, A question for you, have you deliberately left the Far North / North Cape / Cape Reinga off the yellow zone? Do Nikau Palms not occur naturally up that far north?

I was up there last year, the vegetation is very subtropical and palms are aplenty, but I can't recall whether Nikau were there or not.

I've driven up to Cape Rengia and out to Spirits Bay and over to Te Hapua twice and didn't see any rainforest up there, it was all Manuka dominated scrub. Like the soil is too dry/ sandy or it all got burnt in fires hundreds of years ago and never came back. I could be wrong there might be remantant rainforest in some moist gullies well away from any roads. No doubt Nikau would thrive up there if planted but the lack of rainforest on the entire Aupouri peninsula was very noticeable.

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richnorm

This one is from the tiny dry and remote Mokohinau Islands and has just flowered for the first time. I had a feeling it would have white flowers and sure enough it has!    We just endured a 100 year drought and these did OK with no irrigation in quite a dry spot.  

IMG_2261.JPG

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IMG_2260.JPG

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greysrigging
15 hours ago, UK_Palms said:

There's some big Norfolk Pine specimens on Tresco over here as well at 50N. I think Tresco is a 10b zone most years though (lowest last winter was +3.8C). I'm not sure if there's any 'big' specimens on the UK mainland. Maybe around Cornwall, Devon and London? Or perhaps the south coast of Ireland? I'm sure there's a few dotted about in mild, protected areas, besides Tresco.

Apparently they get killed off in northern Florida though which is 8b - 9a. I think you need to go a bit below Daytona Beach before you can start growing them over there, in which case it will be 10a zones where you can start growing them. You'll need someone from the States to verify that though...

52679.jpg

Very common on the Aussie East Coast north and south of Sydney and you do see them inland from the coast where mild frosts might occur. same as the south west of WA.
Even in Darwin they are here and there all through the suburbs, people up here use them as Xmas Trees and decorate with lights in the front yard in December ( although to my eyes they never look all that healthy and happy in our climate, simply too hot, then too dry in the 'dry season'. )
And nowhere on the  Australian mainland do they look as good as on Norfolk Island itself ( and they're happy on Lord Howe as well )
All in all quite a tough resilient tree that will grow ( if not exactly thrive ) in a wide variety of climatic zones and soils way different to its natural habitat on Norfolk Island.

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sipalms
2 hours ago, richnorm said:

This one is from the tiny dry and remote Mokohinau Islands and has just flowered for the first time. I had a feeling it would have white flowers and sure enough it has!    We just endured a 100 year drought and these did OK with no irrigation in quite a dry spot.  

IMG_2261.JPG

IMG_2259.JPG

IMG_2260.JPG

Beautiful... Didn't even know those islands existed.

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