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About Cold Damage and Northern Gulf Coast

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Tropicdoc
9 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

As for the two back-to-back freezes this January (about a week and half apart), I feel as though the first one was worse than the second, even though the second freeze was actually colder over here in northeastern Florida (Gainesville).  The first freeze went on forever.  It was so many hours below freezing.  My lowest temperature in that first freeze was 27 F, but it was nothing like the 27 F I have experienced in years past (previously, a very quick drop from warm weather down to 27 F and then quickly back up above freezing again -- maybe 27 F for a few minutes overnight).  This time, there were two very cold nights in a row and the number of hours below freezing was far more than I normally get.  Of course, it didn't stay freezing in the day time, but wow.

 

The back-to-back effect was brutal.  My plant damage looking worse every day.

We stayed at or above freezing all day one day. The ground was frozen solid

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Matthew92

More damage showing as time goes on, even on things that looked unscathed a week ago. This is in a neighborhood right behind the toll area for the bridge that goes across the bay to the barrier island in Destin. The landscaping is more "tropical" than typical for around here. In years past I've thought there may be a slight microclimate (being very close to the bay), but maybe not. I'm guessing low temps were very similar to me this year (I'm a little further inland).

P. canariensis (shortly after the 18 deg freeze, I drove through here and didn't see the brown that now shows)

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Livistona chinensis in the area are showing more burn each day. Still will be totally recoverable.

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Queen palm as shown earlier in this thread. I can't believe how good it looks in this picture- in person I didn't notice the remaining green much at all. Also hard to see are fronds hanging down after having lost rigidity from tissue damage.

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Oleander bushes toasted. It's unfortunate people landscape with the less cold hardy varieties around here. The hardy types hardly even brown at these temps.

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Although hard to tell, this Washingtonian has slight bringing on most all leaves.

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More bronzed Washingtonians and a P. canariensis that seems (for now) to have fared pretty well.

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Edited by Opal92

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mdsonofthesouth

In my limited experience with livistona is most frond just need a quick blast in the teens start the defoliation. My clump took about 5 or 6 high teens blasts to completely defoliate, frond damage easily came at a much higher temperature. I will say it took until late january for the exposed spears declined. Will see if its truly perennial and bud hardy as I have heard for this area as I think it would be the cool to keep around. 

Edited by mdsonofthesouth

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TexasColdHardyPalms

Those L. Chilensis and CIDP look WAY better than and dip to 18F here.  That is what they would look like after a quick dip to 20F.  Same with that Robusta.

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Matthew92

A few more

As expected, this Phoenix roebelleni is a goner.

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This next palm looked like it would have hardly any browning a week and a half ago (the hard freeze was over 3 weeks ago), and now I wouldn't be surprised that it ends up losing all it's fronds. When this subdivision was built in about 2003-04, they installed a large Phoenix palm here (canariensis). It never thrived in this spot (thanks to over trimming, encasing in pavement, and soil compaction), but still was a noteworthy centerpiece. It was damaged but recovered in 2010 where it probably saw temps a little below 20 deg. 2014 put the final nail in the coffin. They replaced it with this Phoenix dactylifera which seems to be of less hardy stock than some others I've seen in the area.

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Now for a couple good examples of hardiness

This Livistona decora looking about perfect

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I am surprised that this weeping Bottlebrush looks as thought nothing happened. From what I had researched, I thought the common weeping types were more mid-zone 9 hardy. Apparently not this one- it actually looks better than some of the "hardy" standard, red flower, upright type (Callistemon citrinus) in the area.

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Sandy Loam

In the first photo, the double phoenix robelleni might recover fine.  Here, after the 2010 freeze, there were brown looking Phoenix Robelleni all over the place, but they eventually recovered (bud-hardy) to my best recollection. Now, after the January 2018 freeze, they are brown again here in northeastern Florida, but I think they will spring back.

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Matthew92

I was curious to further explore areas on the "barrier island" (technically Destin is not a barrier island being connected to the mainland) to see how things fared compared to the mainland.

Livistona chinensis noticeably less burned.

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This is the queen palm I mentioned earlier in this thread that was one of the only survivors I saw personally in the area that didn't have mortal damage in the 2014 freeze. Even with over trimming, nutritional deficiencies, and more temps in the 20's this winter, it is still chugging along.

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Queen palms performance was a mixed bag. Not sure if they were overtrimmed before or after the freezes. All the specimens here were planted after the 2014 freeze (about the same time as those planted in front of that apartment complex Estlander posted photos of earlier in this thread).

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P. reclinata clumps already hacked to remove damaged fronds. (I'm thinking that larger trunk was from pre-2014).

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Hard to tell in picture (couldn't figure out how to zoom in with my surface), but this is another P. reclinata (or hybrid) clump.

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That resort has been very bold with planting more tropical things in their landscaping over the years. Besides the queens and Phoenix reclinata, I've even seen royal palms planted there (seen on a pre-2010 streeview image- obviously a short lived planting). There's another sign for the resort out near the main road U.S. 98. Sometime around 2007 or before, they planted Bismarkias there. They survived fairly well for a number of years. 2010 killed some of them, and left one Bismarck that looked horrible at first but recovered well and was growing strong in it's last years before it was killed in 2014. All that is left now is one lone P. canariensis which itself was heavily damaged in 2014.

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Edited by Opal92

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Sandy Loam

Wow.  I can't believe we talking about Phoenix Canariensis, Syagrus Romanzoffiana, Phoenix Reclinata and Livistona Chinensis as at-risk Palms in the panhandle.  Those are some of the bullet-proof palms here in Gainesville and, despite the nasty January 2018 freeze, none of those species suffered any damage here,  Naturally, the tender stuff was fried, but the cold-hardy palms were completely unharmed here.  And yet, I am located at almost the same latitude as you, Opal, and you are closer to an "ocean" than me.

There are not a lot of Bismarckia Nobilis here in Gainesville, but two that I recently drove past did not look damaged by the big January 2018 freeze.  The Phoenix Robelleni, on the other hand, are looking badly damaged, among many other zone 9b palms and plants that probably don't belong way up here in northeastern Florida.

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Matthew92
31 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

Wow.  I can't believe we talking about Phoenix Canariensis, Syagrus Romanzoffiana, Phoenix Reclinata and Livistona Chinensis as at-risk Palms in the panhandle.  Those are some of the bullet-proof palms here in Gainesville and, despite the nasty January 2018 freeze, none of those species suffered any damage here,  Naturally, the tender stuff was fried, but the cold-hardy palms were completely unharmed here.  And yet, I am located at almost the same latitude as you, Opal, and you are closer to an "ocean" than me.

There are not a lot of Bismarckia Nobilis here in Gainesville, but two that I recently drove past did not look damaged by the big January 2018 freeze.  The Phoenix Robelleni, on the other hand, are looking badly damaged, among many other zone 9b palms and plants that probably don't belong way up here in northeastern Florida.

I'm surprised any significant number of queen palms survived in Gainesville in 2010. I remember checking the temps that morning and Gainesville was about the same as me at 17 deg. I mean, we are both zone 8b, which means upper teens on average every winter. There was nothing unusual this year, and actually you stayed at 9a I believe.

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Sandy Loam

.... to my knowledge (and I could be wrong), no teens in Gainesville since the big 2010 freeze night, and 17 F might have been out at the airport.  Yet it certainly was extremely cold in that freeze and I recall at least one queen palm that was killed outright in 2010, although there are still many mature queen palms around town.  Gainesville is zone 9a, says USDA, but there is a lot of climate variation from patch to patch around town.

This year was a shock and people are still talking about what a cold January it was in 2018.  One night hit 23 degrees in some parts of town. Until this January, my backyard thermometer hadn't recorded any temperatures lower than 26 F for at least six+ years, and there are many parts of town that are warmer than mine. 

Twenty minutes north and west of Gainesville, however, you won't see a single queen palm (Newberry, FL, High Springs, FL, etc.)  Those places get very cold in winter.  Six degrees colder than Gainesville is pretty common out there.    

 

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Matthew92
29 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

.... to my knowledge (and I could be wrong), no teens in Gainesville since the big 2010 freeze night, and 17 F might have been out at the airport.  Yet it certainly was extremely cold in that freeze and I recall at least one queen palm that was killed outright in 2010, although there are still many mature queen palms around town.  Gainesville is zone 9a, says USDA, but there is a lot of climate variation from patch to patch around town.

This year was a shock and people are still talking about what a cold January it was in 2018.  One night hit 23 degrees in some parts of town. Until this January, my backyard thermometer hadn't recorded any temperatures lower than 26 F for at least six+ years, and there are many parts of town that are warmer than mine. 

Twenty minutes north and west of Gainesville, however, you won't see a single queen palm (Newberry, FL, High Springs, FL, etc.)  Those places get very cold in winter.  Six degrees colder than Gainesville is pretty common out there.    

 

Huh, according to this site http://www.plantmaps.com/interactive-florida-usda-plant-zone-hardiness-map.php Gainesville is well within 8b.

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Sandy Loam

That's strange.  The map you posted is from plantmaps.com, but if you go to USDA's site, you'll see that Gainesville is in zone 9a both on the actual map and when you enter zip codes, such as 32601:  http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/

I don't know why plantmaps.com has zones that are different from the USDA's own zone map.

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Sandy Loam

.... I've been looking at that plantmaps.com map again and it has several major differences from the USDA hardiness zones map.  Among other things,  It has Palm Beach in zone 9b and zone 10a for Miami and the Keys.  In the USDA map, Miami is zone 11a and the Keys are entirely zone 11b.  Palm Beach is at the top end of zone 10b on the USDA map too. The shapes of the zones are different as well. 

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Estlander
32 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

That's strange.  The map you posted is from plantmaps.com, but if you go to USDA's site, you'll see that Gainesville is in zone 9a both on the actual map and when you enter zip codes, such as 32601:  http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/

I don't know why plantmaps.com has zones that are different from the USDA's own zone map.

That’s because it’s the old 1990 USDA Hardiness Zone Maps. USDA updated their zone maps in 2012. 

The beaches here on the panhandle used to be in 8B on the old version but were upgraded to 9A. Gainesville too. 

Edited by Estlander

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Matthew92
8 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

.... I've been looking at that plantmaps.com map again and it has several major differences from the USDA hardiness zones map.  Among other things,  It has Palm Beach in zone 9b and zone 10a for Miami and the Keys.  In the USDA map, Miami is zone 11a and the Keys are entirely zone 11b.  Palm Beach is at the top end of zone 10b on the USDA map too. The shapes of the zones are different as well. 

Huh.. okay. Well I guess I'm a little behind the power curve on that one.

7 hours ago, Estlander said:

That’s because it’s the old 1990 USDA Hardiness Zone Maps. USDA updated their zone maps in 2012. 

The beaches here on the panhandle used to be in 8B on the old version but were upgraded to 9A. Gainesville too. 

Hmm.. well both Gainesville and Panhandle beaches have seen 8b temps within the last 8 years. If I were giving advice to a gardener moving to either area I'd definitely tell them to prepare for such temps.

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Xerarch
9 minutes ago, Opal92 said:

Hmm.. well both Gainesville and Panhandle beaches have seen 8b temps within the last 8 years. If I were giving advice to a gardener moving to either area I'd definitely tell them to prepare for such temps.

I think it’s a generally good idea to plant the backbone of your garden to withstand at least a half zone lower than your rating. Feel free to have some fun and zone push, but nobody wants their entire garden looking like world war 3 after a cold winter. 

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Estlander
2 hours ago, Opal92 said:

Huh.. okay. Well I guess I'm a little behind the power curve on that one.

Hmm.. well both Gainesville and Panhandle beaches have seen 8b temps within the last 8 years. If I were giving advice to a gardener moving to either area I'd definitely tell them to prepare for such temps.

If you look at the temps we regularly 

experenced in the past then in the 60’s and 80’s

Destin would have been classified as Zone 8A. 

The lowest Destin had seen is 4 F (1985) :D

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TexasColdHardyPalms

The USDA rating is the average lowest temperature seen during the year.  Average is the key word here so while you have seen 18-19 two out of the last 8 years if the other years lows were 20-28 you would easily average above 20F (9A zone). The USDA rating has nothing to do with what the absolute coldest you could see in your respected area.  

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Matthew92

Here's a good example of a hardy oleander (mentioned earlier in thread). Upper teens? no problem.

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To compare, this other one is in the same neighborhood. I seem to notice that the leaves on the less hardy varieties are a lot bigger.

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When I visited the Dallas, TX area this past January, it was right after they had mid to lower teens- and I remember spotting a group of oleander bushes that astonishingly looked untouched! I do know the pink flowering variety "Calypso" is good, and I've seen a white flowering one in my area that is hardy, but does anyone else know what the other zone 8-proof varieties are? I'm sure there has to be a good market for them in more marginal areas: again, I'm surprised more people in my area don't invest in them.

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Xerarch

I have been under the impression that the standard size oleanders are quite hardy, but the dwarf sized ones are not. At least I know the “petite pink” dwarf variety is a wimp, and of course it was the most commonly used variety in AZ. The large ones, regardless of color, white, red, or in between, were always hardy by my observation. Having said all that I’m sure there are many many varieties with which I am not familiar. 

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ShadowNight030

I’m in central Louisiana (16 degrees). In town we have LOTS of Mexican fans, Phoenix palms of many types, Chinese fans, queens, and majesty palms that were hit hard. I expect all the queens and majesty palms to die. A few Phoenix palms may rot but hopefully many will live. And I see green crowns on the Chinese and Mexican fan palms. All the butias and mules look fine. My mule that is 3 feet high only had light damage on the leaf tips. A few of my neighbors have larger mules that are unharmed. Almost every house in my neighborhood has citrus which is super unfortunate. Many of the trees were only 6 feet tall and are either completely or mostly defoliated. I’m in zone 9a so this was a hard winter. My neighbor has 3 jacarandas, 3 guavas, a mango, and 5 citrus trees. I have starfruit and bananas that are totally brown. My spineless Yucca, hibiscus, foxtail ferns, philodendron, umbrella plants, and papyrus and totally brown and it’s a waiting game for them. Surprisingly most oleanders in my area are still green, even smaller ones. The birds of paradise in my neighborhood are all brown, but they all survived a winter about 5 years ago when we hit 17 and froze over 4 times, so I expect them to all survive. I was able to wrap my Norfolk pine in many many layers of fabrics and it’s partially yellow, but alive. It’s in a pot now until April. My mother left her Bougainvillea uncovered and it was completely brown. She then trimmed it and found the branches closest to the ground were still green. Her rubber ficus is the same. My had my majesty covered and it was totally brown. There were various green places but I believe it’s dead, although I’m not removing it until July just to make sure (last year when we hit 21 for 2 nights most majestys and Phoenix r. were dead looking, but by July most recovered.) 

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Tropicdoc

Greetings ShadowNight. Where abouts are you? 

I had a huge bougainvillea. I got tired of fighting the thorns to trim the dead branches every year. I'm gonna put some in large pots and keep them in bush form and protected from the cold.

I lost 2 king palms and 2 Dypsis leptocheilosis to this freeze. They were zone pushed anyway.

Chaemadorea radicalis-unfazed, Sabal bermudana- almost unfazed, Livistona chinenesis (under canopy) - unfazed, Arenga Engleri (under canopy)- 50% burn, mule palm in a pot- unfazed, Butia x parajubaea- 15% burn, but heroic protection measures were used (these are expensive palms)

To be planted in April- 2 more butia x parajubaea, 2 butia x jubaea x syagrus, butyagrus.... will probably start a thread on this planting as it will be around the new pool being built right now and it will be fun to watch things grow

 

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ShadowNight030
50 minutes ago, Tropicdoc said:

Greetings ShadowNight. Where abouts are you? 

I had a huge bougainvillea. I got tired of fighting the thorns to trim the dead branches every year. I'm gonna put some in large pots and keep them in bush form and protected from the cold.

I lost 2 king palms and 2 Dypsis leptocheilosis to this freeze. They were zone pushed anyway.

Chaemadorea radicalis-unfazed, Sabal bermudana- almost unfazed, Livistona chinenesis (under canopy) - unfazed, Arenga Engleri (under canopy)- 50% burn, mule palm in a pot- unfazed, Butia x parajubaea- 15% burn, but heroic protection measures were used (these are expensive palms)

To be planted in April- 2 more butia x parajubaea, 2 butia x jubaea x syagrus, butyagrus.... will probably start a thread on this planting as it will be around the new pool being built right now and it will be fun to watch things grow

 

I’m 30 minutes south of Alexandria. I knew my majesty was a little push, but they did so well here so I thought I’d give it a try. I lost a Bismarck palm, and I lost a Phoenix r. Along with a spineless Yucca which I’m hoping will come back from either the ground or the trunk. In spring I decided I will dig out the palms since majesties and phoenix r. are so cheap. I will replace the Bismarck with a mule palm. We have harsh winters in the high teens every 5 or so years and I don’t have the time or patience to keep up with a Bismarck palm. 

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Sandy Loam

Tropicdoc, we can't wait to see your photo evolution around the pool over the next few years.  Strart a fresh thread for us all to follow!

Speaking of Butia x Jubaea x Syagrus, has anyone seen a photo of one at a semi-mature size?  I haven't bought this hybrid because I need to stop planting anything with the slightest bit of Syagrus, just in case Fusarium Wilt gets it.  However, I would love to see photos, especially in Tropicdoc's new landscaping this summer.

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Tropicdoc

Will do I need to figure out how to put a link in this thread 

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Tropicdoc

Ok I started it it’s called new pool with landscaping

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ShadowNight030

I talked with some family in Nola. Around their pool they have a foxtail palm and several Phoenix r. They believe they have lost most of them, and if it did get 19 there they probably did lose the palms. In Nola it’s not uncommon to see royal, foxtail, fishtail, Bismarck, or lady palms. I have even seen Christmas and bottle palms there. I have a friend there that has a 9 foot white bird of paradise clump and 13 foot Norfolk Pine. She trimmed up the bird of paradise and is getting the Norfolk cut down. 

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Sandy Loam
7 hours ago, ShadowNight030 said:

I talked with some family in Nola. Around their pool they have a foxtail palm and several Phoenix r. They believe they have lost most of them, and if it did get 19 there they probably did lose the palms. In Nola it’s not uncommon to see royal, foxtail, fishtail, Bismarck, or lady palms. I have even seen Christmas and bottle palms there. I have a friend there that has a 9 foot white bird of paradise clump and 13 foot Norfolk Pine. She trimmed up the bird of paradise and getting the Norfolk cut down. 

Wow.  If New Orleans got down to 19 degrees Fahrenheit one night, that would kill all of the palms you mentioned except for the lady palm (rhapis excels) and the phoenix reclinata, unless they are pure reclinata.  A lot of the phoenix reclinata that we see around Florida here don't seem like pure reclinata.  I always look for the fatter trunks because the very thin-trunked specimens are supposedly pure Phoenix Reclinata and the others are accidentally hybridized and spread around.    

I hope the Bismarckia Nobilis in NOLA survived 19 degrees, although I don't know if that is possible. They have survived much colder than that in Tallahassee, so I remain hopeful. Let us know what your next drive-around in New Orleans shows survived. 

PalmTalk Keith in Louisiana said that this was a thirty-year freeze for your state. I assume that means it was the worst freeze in three decades.  Wow.     

 

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ShadowNight030
On 2/18/2018, 10:35:12, Sandy Loam said:

Wow.  If New Orleans got down to 19 degrees Fahrenheit one night, that would kill all of the palms you mentioned except for the lady palm (rhapis excels) and the phoenix reclinata, unless they are pure reclinata.  A lot of the phoenix reclinata that we see around Florida here don't seem like pure reclinata.  I always look for the fatter trunks because the very thin-trunked specimens are supposedly pure Phoenix Reclinata and the others are accidentally hybridized and spread around.    

I hope the Bismarckia Nobilis in NOLA survived 19 degrees, although I don't know if that is possible. They have survived much colder than that in Tallahassee, so I remain hopeful. Let us know what your next drive-around in New Orleans shows survived. 

PalmTalk Keith in Louisiana said that this was a thirty-year freeze for your state. I assume that means it was the worst freeze in three decades.  Wow.     

 

Most of the bismarks in Nola I have seen personally are not small nor tall. They are medium ish sized. Although driving through the riverfront homes I’ve seen them planted very small. I know the royal palms have survived past winters with complete leaf loss, but those lows have been 25, and I’m giving them 25 and maybe 24 as their ultimate low. I think majesties can maybe recover from this, as I’ve seen 14 and 15 foot majesty palms in various neighborhoods and personally I’ve had them come back from 20 degrees. I know foxtail palms are barely zone 9b palms so I know they will not return. I don’t know much about the others as I’ve been into palms for maybe 2 years. I know the queen palms will been fine as there are huge ones in Nola and they are very widely planted Baton Rouge down. I have seen a maybe 20 to 30 foot Norfolk in the french quarter in between houses and I wanna see how it faired. 

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Tropicdoc

For everyone’s knowledge.... i am now seeing queens and Pygmy dates around town pushing green spears.... after 17 F

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TexasColdHardyPalms

I'm surprised. I was on i10 and 12 yesterday and saw a lot of collapsed robusta crowns and burnt butia. 

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Palmensammler

Here in Germany we are now facing a short cold spell with minimum temps down to 10F. Hope my unprotected Trachies will survive.

At the end of thet week warmer temps shall come back.

Hope all your palms will survive too.

Eckhard

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TexasColdHardyPalms
3 hours ago, Palmensammler said:

Here in Germany we are now facing a short cold spell with minimum temps down to 10F. Hope my unprotected Trachies will survive.

At the end of thet week warmer temps shall come back.

Hope all your palms will survive too.

Eckhard

10f doesnt phase waggy or fortunei. 

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Tropicdoc
22 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

I'm surprised. I was on i10 and 12 yesterday and saw a lot of collapsed robusta crowns and burnt butia. 

Well the palms I mentioned are defoliated but have green coming from the growth point

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TexasColdHardyPalms

@Tropicdoc I forgot to mention that I stayed north of the lake and didn't go in New Orleans. It was an ugly site and shocking for South Louisiana.

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ShadowNight030

So far I have seen Sylvester and Chinese fan palms starting to put our fresh growth. Mexican fan and date palms have green spears but no new fronds. Many perennial tropicals are coming back as well including all the citrus, Bougainvillea, rubber focus, bird of paradise, etc. I had also seen a tropical guava with leaves midway down the tree budding out. One of my majesty palms’s spear pulled and the other didn’t. I’m not going to pour anything on them like peroxide. If they die they die. I’m just interested still if they can recover. Pygmy dates aren’t a rarity in my area. Many of them look dead, but they did last year this time of year, too. I wanna see if maybe the bigger ones will come back. People already cut down their queens in my area. A few medjool dates have been removed as well. One yard the owners removed a huge canary island palm. There’s a yard not far from my house that has 20+ canary island palms sizes ranging from a foot to 10 feet. They take wedding photos there I believe. 

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Sandy Loam

Wow.  I am surprised to hear about CIDP being removed.  That's bad.  Maybe queens, but CIDP?!!  The extreme lost temperature on the coldest night in NOLA was 19 F, wasn't it?

ShadowNight030, you mentioned that the Bougainvillea are coming back again, but from the roots..  How do Bougainvillea do over winter in New Orleans?  Does it vary from year to year?   Here in northeastern Florida, they generally die back in winter, but just a couple of hours south of here, in Tampa and Orlando, Bougainvillea grow into big trees which stay beautiful all winter long.     

Based on what I have seen here, I suspect that your Pygmy date palms will come back again.  During northeastern Florida freezes, I have seen several Pygmy Date Palms turn 100% brown/grey, but they always seem to recover again.  Their fronds are very dainty for such a bud-hardy tree.  The 2009-2010 freezes were so bad here, but the Pygmy Date Palms all came back again.      

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TexasColdHardyPalms

The owner that cut the canary down killed a living tree. Cidp is very bud hardy. Trunking specimens will survive 10f without issue. 

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ShadowNight030
23 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

Wow.  I am surprised to hear about CIDP being removed.  That's bad.  Maybe queens, but CIDP?!!  The extreme lost temperature on the coldest night in NOLA was 19 F, wasn't it?

ShadowNight030, you mentioned that the Bougainvillea are coming back again, but from the roots..  How do Bougainvillea do over winter in New Orleans?  Does it vary from year to year?   Here in northeastern Florida, they generally die back in winter, but just a couple of hours south of here, in Tampa and Orlando, Bougainvillea grow into big trees which stay beautiful all winter long.     

Based on what I have seen here, I suspect that your Pygmy date palms will come back again.  During northeastern Florida freezes, I have seen several Pygmy Date Palms turn 100% brown/grey, but they always seem to recover again.  Their fronds are very dainty for such a bud-hardy tree.  The 2009-2010 freezes were so bad here, but the Pygmy Date Palms all came back again.      

I do not live in Nola, I live in central Louisiana where it got down to 16. But still the canary palms here do fine. Bougainvillea here dies to the roots every few winters, and in Nola they grow rather large. Is say they only died back a few inches to feet depending on location. My family on Nola say the only tree being removed in their area is their foxtail. All the queen palms there should come back due to their size, and queens can be found practically everywhere there, even lining a few streets in the city. 

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_Keith

Judging by the pictures most of you guys got off light compared to here.  My CIDP had 100% foliage loss and I was delighted to see a tiny bit of green emerging.  I have the 6  P. sylvestris, with 3 showing life and 3 still with nothing.  I will be very surprised if my P. reclinata comes back.  It appears dead to the ground.   Same with my very large A. engleri.   My really big queen that sailed through previous hard winters still shows no sign of life.  While all of my mules are alive, they vary from 100% foliage loss to hardly disturbed.   I walk around every few days with binoculars look up at the crowns hoping for a tiny bit of green emerging.

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