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jb1336

Albizia coreana (or kalkora?)

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jb1336

I recently last year received seeds of Albizia coreana (or kalkora) from a university in North Carolina. The Albizia species is reportedly "rare" but I think they're just rare in cultivation, but I could be wrong.  Here are photos on the internet of the prince ear tree (왕자 귀 트리) which aren't my photos but show a good representation of the species.

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Missi

Albizia...Calliandra....visually very similar :blink:

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Silas_Sancona
1 hour ago, Missi said:

Albizia...Calliandra....visually very similar :blink:

Albizia, Acacia, Mimosa and Calliandra, among other Genera with the classic puff-ball type flowers, are all in the Mimosoideae subfamily of Legumes. 

Wonder if this species exhibits any aggressive seeding tendencies like A. julibrissin or A. Lebbeck. Specimens of our regionally native A. sinaloensis don't seem to.. or should i say, i wasn't able to locate seedlings under or near the large ones in Scottsdale. Compare this with White Lead Tree ( Leucanea leucocephala) that sprouts everywhere the pods are blown.

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jb1336

Its looks like its a  more controlled species of Albizia. But hybridization between the weedy and invasive A. julibrissin is a risk because they're genetically close but not exact.

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Eric in Orlando
On 1/10/2018, 11:26:50, Silas_Sancona said:

Albizia, Acacia, Mimosa and Calliandra, among other Genera with the classic puff-ball type flowers, are all in the Mimosoideae subfamily of Legumes. 

Wonder if this species exhibits any aggressive seeding tendencies like A. julibrissin or A. Lebbeck. Specimens of our regionally native A. sinaloensis don't seem to.. or should i say, i wasn't able to locate seedlings under or near the large ones in Scottsdale. Compare this with White Lead Tree ( Leucanea leucocephala) that sprouts everywhere the pods are blown.

Albizia sinaloensis is an awesome tree. I have seen the large specimen at the U of AZ campus in Tucson. I found lots of pods with viable seeds but no seedlings. We have a couple growing here now.

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Silas_Sancona
2 hours ago, Eric in Orlando said:

Albizia sinaloensis is an awesome tree. I have seen the large specimen at the U of AZ campus in Tucson. I found lots of pods with viable seeds but no seedlings. We have a couple growing here now.

Agree w/ you Eric.. 

Until I'd discovered the specimens planted around the south side of the Library in Scottsdale,  the U.of A. specimen was high on my list to investigate since it appeared that it was one of the few cultivated anywhere here in Arizona. From all i'd noted, it really seems to be a very clean tree, certainly much cleaner than your average Silk Tree. Far larger than I'd have guessed under local conditions( ..let alone those in Tucson) that include more susceptibility to occasional frost/ drier overall conditions compared to where it comes from just to our south. 

Like I'd said before in a thread late last summer, this Albizia sp. seems like a nice candidate to experiment with on a wider scale in local parks and commercial landscapes where it's mature size wouldn't be an issue. Reminds me alot of some of the larger Enterolobium specimens I'd see around Clearwater.

On a side note,

Conzattia multiflora, Hesperalbizia occidentalis, and Platymiscium trifoliatum are 3 other, pretty much unknown, Legume type  sp. from the same section of Sonora and Sinaloa, that deserve wider investigation/ experimentation.  Think there are acouple other Platymiscim sp. further south in Mexico, worth looking at as well.

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jb1336

Update:

Planted a few and so far one germinated. They don’t look like kalkora or coreana though looks like regular albizia juli

4A46FCE9-56E5-4894-8C40-AD8A25B52873.jpeg

335EF31C-7578-4CDA-87CB-9380A9993195.jpeg

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TreeHunterDonald
On 1/10/2018 at 6:42 AM, jb1336 said:

I recently last year received seeds of Albizia coreana (or kalkora) from a university in North Carolina. The Albizia species is reportedly "rare" but I think they're just rare in cultivation, but I could be wrong.  Here are photos on the internet of the prince ear tree (왕자 귀 트리) which aren't my photos but show a good representation of the species.

 

Hey, I’m really interested in acquiring these seeds, could you kindly share which university you got them from and how. Thanks, I live in GEORGIA 

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jb1336
On 2/6/2021 at 4:13 PM, TreeHunterDonald said:

Hey, I’m really interested in acquiring these seeds, could you kindly share which university you got them from and how. Thanks, I live in GEORGIA 

JCRA Raulston in either Durham or Raleigh, NC I think. The seeds I got never germinated and one the ones that did didn't come up as Albizia kalkora. Even now I'm still looking for sources and haven't had any luck so far. There is one source that claims it is Albizia kalkora on Alibaba and on cnseeds.  I found a feral tree on Google Maps I hope to get some root cuttings from it soon. Good luck.

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Patrick
On 6/19/2019 at 12:57 AM, jb1336 said:

Update:

Planted a few and so far one germinated. They don’t look like kalkora or coreana though looks like regular albizia juli

4A46FCE9-56E5-4894-8C40-AD8A25B52873.jpeg

 

Though these Albizias are a wonderful group of plants, this was an evil sight to see over in Hawaii/ Pahoa as this was the common name for their hugely (and huge) invasive trees that they  are battling over there. The seedlings looked exactly like this and you pull them without a second thought. The actual name of their problem tree is Falcataria moluccana- from Malaysia I believe. I once had a surveyor cut a perimeter around my property  to find the pins at the property corners, and I spent the next couple years picking out THOUSANDS of seedlings just like this along the lines that he had cleared. The sunlight finally hitting the cleared ground activated seemingly every viable seed that had landed in these areas. Tedious work. I ringed one tree that had probably a 6' diameter (if not more) trunk a few vacant lots over. I called it "The Mothership". 

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