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Indian coconut sprouted - in Okinawa

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palmfriend

Hello everyone,

hooked by the thread about the most cold tolerant coconuts and since it was mentioned that Indian Cocos nucifera might 

be a candidate for top of that list, I crawled through the web looking for a shop IN Japan selling imported coconuts -

and I got a super hit! There is one INDIAN shop in Tokyo selling exactly those - coconuts from INDIA!

(I don`t know if they ship internationally, the shop`s name is "Desibasket Tokyo". You will find it quickly through a web search.)

Order was placed after getting informed about a new arrival of fresh coconuts - mid of September - and a few days later

I got them delivered.

001x.thumb.jpg.116b012429b2c144269b1b748

I had no idea about their viability, so I kept the order in a small frame.

002x.thumb.jpg.279c99a9e21c833a766b3480f

Here they are - Indian coconuts from the Mumbay region.

I wasn`t sure about their husks` condition, so I just sprayed and zip-locked them, placed them first outside and when the temperatures started to drop a few days ago,

inside on a heating mat.

004x.thumb.jpg.dfc168a2677084523728163dc

I lost one quite soon due to a damaged husk - milk came out through different tiny holes - but the remaining three seemed to be in a perfect condition.

Yesterday, when family business came to an end for the day I went up for a check and...

005x.thumb.jpg.767ae0a5706adcfadd2445258

Ho ho ho!!! Is it what I think it is....?!

007x.thumb.jpg.c53e0ddc3bd632399b1c6542a

Wow, no doubt - an Indian cocos nucifera is coming to life here on Miyako island, Okinawa-Japan. (yesterday)

006x.thumb.jpg.e9a8d1de0ecb344b3bb057e45

"Say `Hello` to the world, little beauty!"

008x.thumb.jpg.ce534cc69fd0b88324b34793c

A final photo (for the moment) taken toady a few minutes ago - I am really really excited!!

Ok, that should be it for the moment, I thought I should let the pt-community know - updates will follow,

best regards

Lars

 

 

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palmfriend

Hello there,

 

I just thought about a short update about my Indian coconut - here we go:

001.thumb.JPG.7dba8806f7bb2a4628056f6032

After two months, placed on a heating mat in a ziplock with some water.

002.thumb.JPG.a80208b0b333132e977ed878e2

Looks good, I think!

003.thumb.JPG.e3d5ff49d1afa9e4175bf52183

It seems that it will warm up during the next days, so I am probably going to pot it up but I will keep it protected.

Result: I got one out of four from this batch - the next order about eight pieces has already arrived and is 

placed on a warm spot, too. 

I will keep you informed,

 

best regards

Lars

 

 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
3 hours ago, palmfriend said:

Hello there,

 

I just thought about a short update about my Indian coconut - here we go:

001.thumb.JPG.7dba8806f7bb2a4628056f6032

After two months, placed on a heating mat in a ziplock with some water.

002.thumb.JPG.a80208b0b333132e977ed878e2

Looks good, I think!

003.thumb.JPG.e3d5ff49d1afa9e4175bf52183

It seems that it will warm up during the next days, so I am probably going to pot it up but I will keep it protected.

Result: I got one out of four from this batch - the next order about eight pieces has already arrived and is 

placed on a warm spot, too. 

I will keep you informed,

 

best regards

Lars

 

 

Lars,

That's great news, and it looks great!  If I were you, I wouldn't wait to pot it up.  It's not good for tree roots to be exposed to air for any length of time, and yours has a good healthy root, so I would go ahead and get it in some potting soil or plant it directly into the ground where you eventually want it to grow (just mark the area really well, so you don't accidentally mow over it, LOL!).  Plus, it needs to start getting sun as soon as possible (but since is has been inside since it sprouted. maybe partial shade outside to begin with).  By the way what are your normal high/low temps in F in your coldest month there?  Here my normal high/low in Jan. (the coldest month) is approximately 65F/50F, so I wouldn't plant one in the ground here in the winter, but yours should be fine planted in the ground now, as people sometimes plant them in the winter in South Florida and they do fine there, and your island is probably a little milder in the winter than South Florida.

John

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GottmitAlex
27 minutes ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Lars,

That's great news, and it looks great!  If I were you, I wouldn't wait to pot it up.  It's not good for tree roots to be exposed to air for any length of time, and yours has a good healthy root, so I would go ahead and get it in some potting soil or plant it directly into the ground where you eventually want it to grow (just mark the area really well, so you don't accidentally mow over it, LOL!).  Plus, it needs to start getting sun as soon as possible (but since is has been inside since it sprouted. maybe partial shade outside to begin with).  By the way what are your normal high/low temps in F in your coldest month there?  Here my normal high/low in Jan. (the coldest month) is approximately 65F/50F, so I wouldn't plant one in the ground here in the winter, but yours should be fine planted in the ground now, as people sometimes plant them in the winter in South Florida and they do fine there, and your island is probably a little milder in the winter than South Florida.

John

Agreed

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palmfriend
On 2/14/2018, 2:52:48, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Lars,

That's great news, and it looks great!  If I were you, I wouldn't wait to pot it up.  It's not good for tree roots to be exposed to air for any length of time, and yours has a good healthy root, so I would go ahead and get it in some potting soil or plant it directly into the ground where you eventually want it to grow (just mark the area really well, so you don't accidentally mow over it, LOL!).  Plus, it needs to start getting sun as soon as possible (but since is has been inside since it sprouted. maybe partial shade outside to begin with).  By the way what are your normal high/low temps in F in your coldest month there?  Here my normal high/low in Jan. (the coldest month) is approximately 65F/50F, so I wouldn't plant one in the ground here in the winter, but yours should be fine planted in the ground now, as people sometimes plant them in the winter in South Florida and they do fine there, and your island is probably a little milder in the winter than South Florida.

John

 

On 2/14/2018, 3:19:33, GottmitAlex said:

Agreed

John, Alex,

I must have had the same thought after posting this - the coconut is already potted up in some good soil, the hole pot put in a 

big plastic bag and placed in a half shady spot. It should work. Temperatures are starting to rise, it seems winter comes to an end.

Regarding our highs and lows: We just had ten days in a row with 56F~59F, which is really cold and usually happens just day wise,

(never constantly), if the northern wind stops - like now - temperatures bouncing back immediately into the 70`s. If we get wind 

from the south, temperatures can make it up to 80F easily. This winter is already considered as "very cold" among the locals,

happens every ten years or so. Generally spoken, winter days in the lower 70`s are common, low tops can reach 52F, high 

tops can make it up to 82/83F. Since we do not have permanent northern winds, I would say, there is no real concern about

a possible life threatening cold damage to our cocos nucifera palms.  

 

Best regards

Lars

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gtsteve

Make sure that you plant it deep enough.

We have only had experience with growing one coconut just a bit older than that. We started babysitting it when it had a few leaves in a pot. The problem was that it had only been planted to the depth of less than half of the seed. The consequence of that was in the wind the root was rocking and being stressed. If it was planted to it's full depth the seed would anchor the root firmly and only the trunk would be bent harmlessly in the wind. We had to wedge two large rocks either side of it to keep it stable in the pot.

This is how we ensured that it got sun as early as possible in the morning. Then inside every night.

PA110003.thumb.JPG.9a0242f041d8e440bdf25

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Mr. Coconut Palm
On ‎2‎/‎16‎/‎2018‎ ‎6‎:‎47‎:‎23‎, palmfriend said:

 

John, Alex,

I must have had the same thought after posting this - the coconut is already potted up in some good soil, the hole pot put in a 

big plastic bag and placed in a half shady spot. It should work. Temperatures are starting to rise, it seems winter comes to an end.

Regarding our highs and lows: We just had ten days in a row with 56F~59F, which is really cold and usually happens just day wise,

(never constantly), if the northern wind stops - like now - temperatures bouncing back immediately into the 70`s. If we get wind 

from the south, temperatures can make it up to 80F easily. This winter is already considered as "very cold" among the locals,

happens every ten years or so. Generally spoken, winter days in the lower 70`s are common, low tops can reach 52F, high 

tops can make it up to 82/83F. Since we do not have permanent northern winds, I would say, there is no real concern about

a possible life threatening cold damage to our cocos nucifera palms.  

 

Best regards

Lars

Hi Lars,

I wouldn't leave your sprout in the plastic bag, unless you want it to get fungus and die.  Now, that it is growing well, it needs to be exposed to the elements, sun and wind and dry out.  Just keep it watered about once every 3 or 4 days when it is not raining there.

John

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Mr. Coconut Palm
On ‎2‎/‎18‎/‎2018‎ ‎5‎:‎02‎:‎34‎, gtsteve said:

Make sure that you plant it deep enough.

We have only had experience with growing one coconut just a bit older than that. We started babysitting it when it had a few leaves in a pot. The problem was that it had only been planted to the depth of less than half of the seed. The consequence of that was in the wind the root was rocking and being stressed. If it was planted to it's full depth the seed would anchor the root firmly and only the trunk would be bent harmlessly in the wind. We had to wedge two large rocks either side of it to keep it stable in the pot.

This is how we ensured that it got sun as early as possible in the morning. Then inside every night.

PA110003.thumb.JPG.9a0242f041d8e440bdf25

Steve,

The wind didn't cause it to slide down off the roof?  Where did you get if from, by the way?

John

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gtsteve

Hi John, if you look closely you can see that we have levelled the pot with a piece of 4"x2" x3' rough sawn timber, which gripped very well, otherwise it would have slipped. Then we moved it around to a better spot then the sun was higher. With this treatment we kept it growing steadily all through winter. The truth is that we were glad to get rid of it, it was quite an effort to warm it in the sun as much as possible and heat the room for it at night.

Mohsen, a regular contributor here grew it from a seed (unhusked) for fun, then had to leave for a while on business so we kept it alive for him until he could get another babysitter for it and ultimately a home was found for it up in hot Queensland. I don't know where the seed came from originally. I believe that it is now quite advanced and doing well in the ground.

I hope that it was ultimately buried properly, you can see how the root would be rocked in the wind like this. 

P7250047.thumb.JPG.018412df00ccc5f7f17d8P7250051.thumb.JPG.0c900bd5d0cba9b217c88P7250052.thumb.JPG.1fe098cc3e0f1da3ccb79

 

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palmfriend
On 2/20/2018, 11:32:56, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Hi Lars,

I wouldn't leave your sprout in the plastic bag, unless you want it to get fungus and die.  Now, that it is growing well, it needs to be exposed to the elements, sun and wind and dry out.  Just keep it watered about once every 3 or 4 days when it is not raining there.

John

John,

no worries about the plastic bag, it is not a ziplock one, just slightly knotted that air can circulate but to keep it a little more moist for a couple days.

Out of the high humidity ziplock straight into our currently dryer air had concerned me a bit - since it is still the only Indian Coconut I have at the moment.

But anyway, I am going to remove the bag probably quite soon - updates will follow :greenthumb:

...

On 2/19/2018, 8:02:34, gtsteve said:

Make sure that you plant it deep enough.

We have only had experience with growing one coconut just a bit older than that. We started babysitting it when it had a few leaves in a pot. The problem was that it had only been planted to the depth of less than half of the seed. The consequence of that was in the wind the root was rocking and being stressed. If it was planted to it's full depth the seed would anchor the root firmly and only the trunk would be bent harmlessly in the wind. We had to wedge two large rocks either side of it to keep it stable in the pot.

This is how we ensured that it got sun as early as possible in the morning. Then inside every night.

 

Steve,

Thank you for your advice - I made the same mistake when I planted my first (sprouted) coconut palm five years ago. I just came back right on time during a typhoon 

to secure it and put a massive layer of soil around it - the wind was awful. Now it is doing very well.

When I plant a sprouted (dehusked) coconut in a pot, I do it this way:

001.thumb.jpg.a1cbbe1a9a5f02a8032cb2f6f0

If it is husked one:

002.thumb.jpg.4a646f8a9e2212624dbbc4115c

Best regards from Okinawa -

Lars

 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
On ‎2‎/‎20‎/‎2018‎ ‎5‎:‎46‎:‎05‎, gtsteve said:

Hi John, if you look closely you can see that we have levelled the pot with a piece of 4"x2" x3' rough sawn timber, which gripped very well, otherwise it would have slipped. Then we moved it around to a better spot then the sun was higher. With this treatment we kept it growing steadily all through winter. The truth is that we were glad to get rid of it, it was quite an effort to warm it in the sun as much as possible and heat the room for it at night.

Mohsen, a regular contributor here grew it from a seed (unhusked) for fun, then had to leave for a while on business so we kept it alive for him until he could get another babysitter for it and ultimately a home was found for it up in hot Queensland. I don't know where the seed came from originally. I believe that it is now quite advanced and doing well in the ground.

I hope that it was ultimately buried properly, you can see how the root would be rocked in the wind like this. 

P7250047.thumb.JPG.018412df00ccc5f7f17d8P7250051.thumb.JPG.0c900bd5d0cba9b217c88P7250052.thumb.JPG.1fe098cc3e0f1da3ccb79

 

Oh, okay, Steve, after closer observation in the photo, I can see the board.  Thanks for being such a good babysitter for Mohsen's baby.  It looks like you took good care of it, but I am sure it is quite happy now in the ground in a tropical part of the country and will soon be bearing fruit I bet!

John

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Mr. Coconut Palm
On ‎2‎/‎21‎/‎2018‎ ‎12‎:‎24‎:‎37‎, palmfriend said:

John,

no worries about the plastic bag, it is not a ziplock one, just slightly knotted that air can circulate but to keep it a little more moist for a couple days.

Out of the high humidity ziplock straight into our currently dryer air had concerned me a bit - since it is still the only Indian Coconut I have at the moment.

But anyway, I am going to remove the bag probably quite soon - updates will follow :greenthumb:

...

Steve,

Thank you for your advice - I made the same mistake when I planted my first (sprouted) coconut palm five years ago. I just came back right on time during a typhoon 

to secure it and put a massive layer of soil around it - the wind was awful. Now it is doing very well.

When I plant a sprouted (dehusked) coconut in a pot, I do it this way:

001.thumb.jpg.a1cbbe1a9a5f02a8032cb2f6f0

If it is husked one:

002.thumb.jpg.4a646f8a9e2212624dbbc4115c

Best regards from Okinawa -

Lars

 

Okay, Lars, it sounds like you are doing good with it.  It looks good, by the way.  I am looking forward to the updates.

John

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Cluster

Hello Lars,

Those are great news, keep us up to date! Are there any others sprouting so far? It must be awesome to sprout such an exotic coconut. I am just not sure about the variety, they have many varieties in India, to get the cold hardy ones must not be easy.

Regards,

Pedro

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palmfriend
2 hours ago, Cluster said:

Hello Lars,

Those are great news, keep us up to date! Are there any others sprouting so far? It must be awesome to sprout such an exotic coconut. I am just not sure about the variety, they have many varieties in India, to get the cold hardy ones must not be easy.

Regards,

Pedro

Hello Pedro,

Thank you - I am definitely going to keep the palmtalkers up to date! You are right about the varieties, the trader told me that his coconuts 

are from the Mumbay region which is not really cold... If I didn`t get it wrong - I checked some Indian home pages - they grow West Indian Talls

for the milk and Dwarfs for the coconut meat. Since the trader in Tokyo offers only coconuts with a lot of milk inside, I am guessing it might be

a West Indian Tall. But we will see, time will tell. (The pot with the palm is already outside in half shade, later I am going to move it to a more

sunnier spot.)

From the new batch (8 pieces) I lost two - the were somehow damaged, milk came out - the remaining six are looking very nice, still

splashy with clean eyes (no mold or scratches), I am optimistic to get at least one more sprouted.

Alright, updates will follow,

best regards -

Lars

 

 

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palmfriend

Hello there,

today I had a day off and after spending some time in the garden I went inside to check my youngest seedlings and seeds,

where I took my time to give my newest coconut delivery a closer look - especially checking the coconuts` eyes for mold 

or scratches.

I didn`t see it first hand...

001x.thumb.jpg.1cfaf590a7d8a92ebdb686133

...even after opening the ziplock, ...

002x.thumb.jpg.e0c6c97ce5c390290e5e79152

...but after lifting it a bit...

003x.thumb.jpg.96bc048688859b39a324fb2a3

Here it is - number two of my Indian cocos nucifera!!  :D:D:D

That was quite fast, germinated within five weeks...

Alright, that for the moment, updates will follow,

best regards -

Lars

 

 

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palmfriend

Hello there,

just a short update about my Indian cocos nucifera - 

here we go:

006.thumb.JPG.1e54e244ebb880190a607ff40a

007.thumb.JPG.5d7a32b5e94341e523d4f6ebe1

It looks strong and healthy - I am really forward to see this one growing up.

Unfortunately the second sprout didn`t make it, but I got still plenty of other still good looking coconuts - updates will follow.

Best regards from Okinawa -

Lars

 

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sandgroper

This is a great thread! Good luck with your coconuts, I’m really interested in seeing your results as they’re looking really good, thanks for sharing your efforts.

cheers, Dave.

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Cluster

Hello Lars,

What an amazing update! Just to be clear how many coconuts do you still have to germinate? I wonder how fast this one will grow and adapt to Miyako, please keep us up to date! I also wonder how it will adapt without husk, but some people on the forum are having success without it, lets hope for the best

 

Regards,

Pedro

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palmfriend

@sandgroper & @Cluster  - Thank you for your kind comments! I have still four other Indian coconuts, looking fine but probably 

taking their time.

Here are some photos from today:

001.thumb.jpg.e7dac9a574c501a1d396825213

Looks definitely good but seems to be not fast - this would speak for a tall species.

In comparison:

003.thumb.jpg.3f6ef0b785a2e88aec2d81d8d2

On the right, a local green one...

004.thumb.jpg.09a2a38b441765a62fa6379ff3

...which sprouted in March, three months after the Indian one.

Today`s find when I checked my coconuts I collected here on Miyako:

005.thumb.jpg.b95bff0d9749261699fde08460

and

006.thumb.jpg.6ddba17e1204d2110f75ca81fd

..here they are - roots breaking the through the shell. "Welcome to the world, baby!"

Alright, this as a short update - I will keep you posted,

best regards

Lars

 

 

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sandgroper

Great stuff Lars! You're doing really well with these. I picked up 24 coconuts from along the beach further north in our state years ago and 23 of them germinated! Unfortunately they all died eventually but I had no idea what I was doing at the time, I reckon I would have a much better chance now as I've been experimenting and playing with these things for a long time now. One thing I did with about 10 of them was to throw them in the garden and cover them with lawn clippings, they germinated the fastest of all, I think the heat and the humidity in there made a big difference. I've always meant to try doing that again but with shop bought coconuts, I think the lawn clippings would maybe take the place of the missing husk as well as providing heat and humidity. I'll give it a go with a few and see what happens.

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palmfriend
17 hours ago, sandgroper said:

Great stuff Lars! You're doing really well with these. I picked up 24 coconuts from along the beach further north in our state years ago and 23 of them germinated! Unfortunately they all died eventually but I had no idea what I was doing at the time, I reckon I would have a much better chance now as I've been experimenting and playing with these things for a long time now. One thing I did with about 10 of them was to throw them in the garden and cover them with lawn clippings, they germinated the fastest of all, I think the heat and the humidity in there made a big difference. I've always meant to try doing that again but with shop bought coconuts, I think the lawn clippings would maybe take the place of the missing husk as well as providing heat and humidity. I'll give it a go with a few and see what happens.

Dave, great advice - thank you very much! 

Btw., I went to the shore last week and couldn`t resist to grab some (more) coconuts which came in from the sea...

0020.thumb.jpg.2ccb896f711d2c6e09815ba2d

and

0021.thumb.jpg.2f11c59fcbd589890c7a126ab

They look all different and it is great fun to find out what species they might be when sprouted. The current from the south passing our island starts in the 

PNG area, passing Indonesia and the Philippines - it should be good for some surprises ;) 

I have posted these two ones before - both are four years old from coconuts I found at our beaches - they are looking really good and strong, I love them.

0023.thumb.jpg.ff0785da3f124e92cac3d4037

and

0024.thumb.jpg.97a55f840a5c641032992fbce

Best regards,

Lars

 

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sandgroper

They look fantastic mate! What a great looking garden you have.

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Cluster

Hello Lars,

Awesome update! Must be cool to live surrounded by coconuts and all looking great! It is nice the Indian ones keeps growing, wonder if the others will also sprout.

Regards, 

Pedro.

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PalmTreeDude

Nice coconuts you got there! If you ever plant those Indian coconuts in the ground and they fruit, prepare to be begged for some of the nuts! :winkie:

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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palmfriend

Thank you all very much!

I am going to keep this thread updated - I am sure there is more to come. :D

Best regards -

Lars

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