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How Is Water Effecting You Climate Now Campared To Away From Water?

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PalmTreeDude

Right now by the lake it is warmer than away from it, so it is warming it up, I am going to see how long it takes to stop. What about you, if your near a lake?

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Palm crazy
On November 20, 2017 7:31:40 PM, PalmTreeDude said:

Right now by the lake it is warmer than away from it, so it is warming it up, I am going to see how long it takes to stop. What about you, if your near a lake?

Here we have warm rain and air that come from the South Pacific Ocean, there called pineapple express.  Right now at 2:20 pm 65F/18.3C with a low of 59F/15C. Will cool down to normal after Turkey Day. 

Edited by Palm crazy
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Palm crazy
30 minutes ago, Palm crazy said:

Here we have warm rain and air that come from the South Pacific Ocean, there called pineapple express.  Right now at 2:20 pm 65F/18.3C with a low of 59F/15C. Will cool down to normal after Turkey Day. 

But getting back to your question, here the farer you are from Puget Sound the cooler it can get at night.  Especially in my area, winter nights can sometime be 15-18 degrees colder 5 miles inland.  

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Walt

The thermal effect of water is apparent when you look at the below temperature map and the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Note the higher temperatures compared to inland locations at the same latitude.  Nighttime lows are higher, but daytime highs will be lower as the inland soil temperatures will warm up faster during the day, while the ocean and sound waters have too great a thermal enertia to rise much, thus holding daytime temperatures down some.

But as the winter chill comes, the ocean and sound waters will cool to a point that the nighttime lows won't be as great a difference than inland temperatures. This will be more apparent towards the end of the winter. When spring comes the daytime highs near the ocean will be lower and lag behind inland locations, as the cold water will draw heat from the air, keeping the air cooler.

http://www.thorntonweather.com/national-temp.php

 

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