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Show Us Your Bromeliads!

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Ben1

Hey guys. 
 

I really enjoy this thread and all the pictures you share. 
 

time to contribute something myself.... 

of course not as lush and tropical than your gardens as I can’t plant any tropical/ subtropical outside but I still like little bromeliad corner in our yard where a mounted some of me bromeliads in a half rotted oak stem. 
 

Gonzer, thanks for your tip how to cut back mother Neoregelias that set pups. I’ve just given it a try and can’t wait for the pups growing better then when I’ve fully cut back the mother plant. 

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Gonzer

What I consider the crown jewel of Tillandsias; T. erici. Harder 'n hell to find (luckily I've got 3) and very temperamental it's pups usually flower after right after appearing so you're lucky if you get a keeper offset that hasn't flowered. No scent but the color is sublime.

0730201310.jpg

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Tracy
2 hours ago, Gonzer said:

What I consider the crown jewel of Tillandsias; T. erici. Harder 'n hell to find (luckily I've got 3) and very temperamental it's pups usually flower after right after appearing so you're lucky if you get a keeper offset that hasn't flowered. No scent but the color is sublime

Very nice color!  What is the overall size of the plant? It is hard to tell without something for perspective in the photo.  When you say temperamental, is that in reference to light exposure, water quality/quantity, low temps, high temps or all the above?

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Gonzer
21 hours ago, Tracy said:

Very nice color!  What is the overall size of the plant? It is hard to tell without something for perspective in the photo.  When you say temperamental, is that in reference to light exposure, water quality/quantity, low temps, high temps or all the above?

Tracy, hard to explain about it's temperamentality, it's got what I call the Diva Syndrome; always wants more, more, more. You give IT more and it just pisses her off! Like I say, hard to explain.  Here you can see the old inflorescences on the pups.

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Tampa Scott

Neoregelia 'Burnsie's Spiral' piZap_1596318558208.thumb.jpg.2c1a510406c86ea5be7bd2bc25f49044.jpg

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Gonzer

An unregistered hybrid; Billbergia 'Domingos Martins' x 'Beadleman'. This guy thrives in full coastal sun.The strappy leaves are leftovers from it's days in lower light.

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Gonzer

And one of mine, Bill. 'Psychotic Reaction'; 'Calcite' x 'Bravo'. Extra large inflorescence.

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Tracy

The flowers are slow to develop on the Hechtia glauca.  I'm still waiting for them to open but the inflorescence has pushed out a bit further.  THe pup appears to be malformed after running  into the adjacent rock while being covered by the parent plant.  I was curious if Hechtia are monoecious or dioecious so looked it up.  Apparently they are doecious, so I am curious if I have a male or female plant.  Probably difficult to assess until the flowers actually bloom.

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Gonzer

As yet unregistered but my cross of Billbergia 'Bob' x "Domingos Martin' finally blooming.

 

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Gonzer

A very, very cool cross; 'Domingos Martins' x 'Beadleman'. Don Beadle is/was (RIP) considered the premier hybridzer of Billbergias.

0822201438 - Edited.jpg

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palmsOrl

I had been wanting to display my Tillandsia and few other smaller bromeliads in my collection on a nice, sinewy piece of wood for a more natural look.  This camphor branch came down in a severe thunderstorm last month so I decided to use it, since it has a nice shape to it and some side branches.

I let it dry out in the car for a month, then sealed all the cut ends with Gorilla glue.  I will be using 2×4s to secure the branch to that wooden base on wheels.  I will also be removing the ties on some of the plants once the glue dries.

I have a few more bromeliads to add, but I think it has turned out pretty well thus far.

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palmsOrl

For all you bromeliad experts out there, I have a question.

I had two large Vriesea gigantea nova that I had grown up from small plants over the past 6 years.  One of these (the larger of the two) I had planted out as part of the landscape at the house.  In late July, it abruptly died of crown rot, less than a week after I had given it a good cleaning up (oh well).  The plant did not produce an inflorescence in its life and did not pup at anytime before or after it died.

I have left the remaining base there in case it would produce a pup to replace the plant, but I have not seen any signs of this occurring.  Is it common for large, tank-forming bromeliads such as the species in question to die without producing at least one pup?  Did this one likely not pup because it abruptly rotted, rather than reaching maximum size and then reaching senescence?  I know that sometimes diseased plants of certain types will put out side growth as a last ditch effort to survive when the main part is dying.

I am kind of worried for the other one and did give it a weak dose of fungicide and have cut back big time on watering (not that it has been required lately).  I guess in the future I will water it less and disinfect the pruning device between cleaning the dead material from the base and cutting any live material.

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Gonzer

Many Vriesea species small/large produce their pups up on the stem rather than near the base. On large species this is especially evident and the main reason why removing offsets is such a pain in the ass. If your plant is totally devoid of greenery I'd say replace it now. And yeah, the big guys can croak suddenly without gifting you any  descendants. When flushing the water from any bromeliad make sure to also hose out between the leaves. All the crap from cup and upper leaves accumulates in the lower regions.

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sandgroper

Mine are not as colourful but they do taste good!

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Silas_Sancona

Dyckia "No ID" after a long HOT Summer where nothing, even stuff in total shade, was spared..  Decided to start pupping, finally.
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Like those long leaves.. Quite brittle though. Have to be mind full whenever i move it to rake out excess duff from the Mesquite from the gravel. Imprints on the back side of the leaves are nice too.
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Tracy
2 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Dyckia "No ID" after a long HOT Summer where nothing, even stuff in total shade, was spared..  Decided to start pupping, finally.
DSC09586.thumb.JPG.a21bf0813c71c9e6868a5b590cac266c.JPG

Like those long leaves.. Quite brittle though. Have to be mind full whenever i move it to rake out excess duff from the Mesquite from the gravel. Imprints on the back side of the leaves are nice too.
DSC09587.thumb.JPG.b7bb0fd567227d27f88d3666b2bc5c9d.JPG

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The imprints aree reminiscent of another bromeliad genus, specifically Puya's.  It does add a lot of character!

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Silas_Sancona
7 minutes ago, Tracy said:

The imprints aree reminiscent of another bromeliad genus, specifically Puya's.  It does add a lot of character!

Have thought the same thing but Puya are next to impossible to grow here.

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