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sgvcns

Vietnam seeds super fresh

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sgvcns

Hi all

I am still in Hanoi for the next few days but thought I would gauge interest.

I have a small number of the following that I am willing to trade for seeds of understorey small palms of a similar Ilk.

I would not think there is any species seeding in California that would be of interest but happy to be proven wrong.

I am not interested in RPS seed that has not sprouted yet as I want as  fresh as these are.

Lanonia magalonii,calciphila and centralis

Pinanga declinata and annamensis(would have to be good for this)

Licuala glaberrima

Caryota monostachya

Happy to swap for seedlings if Aussie shipping

Thanks for looking but I have zero interest in selling these at the moment.

I also have Areca triandra seed which I would be more flexible about a swap as it's not in the league of the rest

Cheers

Steve

 

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sgvcns

Sorry forgot to say PM me with any offers. I will try to respond quickly

Steve

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sgvcns

Done the final inventory and can add limited amount of Pinanga baviensis to the list

Cheers

Steve

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sgvcns

Images

P annamensisP1000028.thumb.JPG.ba21ed34db2131eab79a8

L glaberrimaP1000037.thumb.JPG.1aa5646c7535b4a653829

Lan magaloniiP1000162.JPG.cdaee84ccd98fa1720ae2ac9b0c

Lan centralisP1000249.thumb.JPG.a10953baeb5c8b9a3b7b8

 

Lan calciphilaP1000407.thumb.JPG.df361a450340af4cd4dc8

Pin declinataP1000205.thumb.JPG.cb70d07756d3136036f47

Pin baviensisP1000387.thumb.JPG.f59c08f402294e075dda3

Car monostachyaP1000400.JPG.1333ac41b8f3791e517ea32a550

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sgvcns

OK I am prepared to consider future palm seed for swap now from credible growers with palms I am interested in.

Cheers

Steve

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sgvcns

These Vietnamese seed are super fast.

Pinanga annamensis and baviensis already sprouting. 

Lanonia won't be far behindP1000493.thumb.JPG.f52d541905c49df46f5efP1000494.thumb.JPG.b5a2ced8bfb081a6bd0e6

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sgvcns

Up to 75% germination on most of these so do not suspect seed will be available after the end of the month

Cheers

Steve

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sgvcns

Just had a look at the seeds and they're nearly all sprouted.

Will post some for sale that I could find non germinated for sale.

These are no longer for trade

Steve

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