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Funkthulhu

First Inflorescence of C.cataractarum in my Office!

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Funkthulhu

Just wanted to post some pictures of my Cham. cat. because it has never bloomed before and this is the largest palm I've ever had do so. (so far)  One popped last week, the other was open when I came in to work on Monday.

Is there a way I can better promote pollination?  I've kinda "simulated wind" with enough shaking to make them both dust each other up.  Any other suggestions?

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Fusca

Very nice!  I believe the Chamaedorea palms are dioecious and yours looks like a male so unless you have another female palm you won't get seed.

Jon

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DCA_Palm_Fan

Yep.  You have a boy!    The trick is to get the female inflorescence and male inflorescence at the same time.   Often, the nursery trade plants so many in a single pot that you are bound to have both in one pot fairly often.  Last summer, before I moved to Florida, I had two large ones  and both shot up both male and female inflos at the same time.  I just bent the female stalk down to the male stalk (the male stalks are usually shorter) and shook it over the female inflo and boom, successful pollination.  I had developing seeds on it as of august when I gave it away.  those seeds are now likely mature. Ill have to check with my friend as he has it.  If its got seeds I am going to have him mail some to me.    Keep us posted!    How about a photo of the entire plant too?     

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DoomsDave

Yes, dioeciousness can be a bit of pain for the eager to reproduce.

If you have any other cat palms, one of them is bound to be a female.

I just couldn't resist this video: (Leroy the palm? :) )

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHQaniX3uGc

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