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Tracy

Ficus id

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Tracy

I have seen this Ficus before, but can't remember which one it is, and there are so many, that my random search of species names I knew failed to come up with a match.  I'm sure someone will recognize this pretty quickly.

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BanyanTim

Without Figs can't know for sure but looks like Ficus palmeri or brandegeei which are slightly different forms of the same. Comes from Baja Mexico. Ficus petiolaris is from the mainland Mexico and very closely related. 

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Silas_Sancona

^^ Was thinking F. palmeri as well. As Tim had mentioned, it and F. petiolaris are close relatives. Can't remember what seperates palmeri and brandegeei though. 

Looking at both out on the patio, and larger specimens around town, and at nurseries which have both in stock at the same time, Ficus petiolaris will often have red veins in the leaves ( especially smaller specimens) while palmeri does not. Palmeri can possess "fuzz" on the leaf petiole itself, which petiolaris lacks. Both can exhibit gold colored bark, at least in larger specimens I've seen. I posted some pictures of a F. palmeri  specimen in Scottsdale in the " walk in the park" thread not long ago. Should give an idea of overall size if you were looking to plant it.

Regardless, both can get big in the ground ( give it room) and can make one seriously awesome Bonsai subject. There's a reason they call em Lava Figs. 

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Tracy
8 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Regardless, both can get big in the ground ( give it room) and can make one seriously awesome Bonsai subject. There's a reason they call em Lava Figs. 

 

9 hours ago, BanyanTim said:

looks like Ficus palmeri or brandegeei

Thank you for the advice!  Yes, I saw the roots, and immediately decided it would not go in the ground, but be a bonsai in my garden.  I do have two Ficus in the ground, but completely non-threatening from a root standpoint (Ficus dammaropsis highland form and lowland form).  My lot is too small to accommodate the larger Ficus, and too many paver walkways & driveways which would get destroyed in short order from their roots.  I can admire their roots in larger spaces.... or as a bonsai!

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epiphyte

Ficus palmeri would be my guess as well.  Are you going to attach some smaller epiphytes to it?  :D  Phorobanas are the best!

A few of my friends and I are planning to head down to Vista this Sunday.  We are going to visit Sunset Valley Orchids and Kartuz.  You should join us!  If you're interested I can give you a few different miniature Tillandsias that are perfect for phorobanas.  

 

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caixeta

Is it a Ficus auriculata ?59c972871c400_ficussp002.thumb.JPG.d4e0c59c972eb9b915_ficussp003.thumb.JPG.17e6a59c9736de2952_ficussp001.thumb.JPG.0df1f59c973a5a5867_ficussp004.thumb.JPG.98bf659c973cfa4688_ficussp005.thumb.JPG.d9562

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Tracy
3 hours ago, caixeta said:

Is it a Ficus auriculata ?

Ficus auriculata has a different shape leaf which isn't as thick as my Ficus, also appears that auriulata leaves are larger.  The closest match is Ficus brandegeei, which has been lumped into Ficus petiolaris.  Some subtle differences, and the ones originally called F brandegeei were specifically from Baja CA versus the F petiolaris name encompasses both mainland Mexico F petiolaris and the Baja only brandegeei (San Marcos growers notes on the plant).  

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Tracy

It does look like the Ficus brandegeei at San Diego (formerly Quail) Botanical Garden.

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Tracy

I had a a major leaf drop a little over a month ago, but then this budded out again, opening flowers and a little fig.  It has been a pretty slow grower in the pot but I'm not letting those roots out to do there thing in my garden.  Potted it remains.

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