Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Alberto

One week trip to Chile, home of Jubaea chilensis

Recommended Posts

Alberto

From 11 to 18 of july I was in Chile with my family. It is certainly the most civilized country in South America. Friendly people. Safe. A lot of different sceneries for different tastes. From Santiago , a millions city to Viña del Mar a seaside resort, to snow covered mountains in a trip and  places with  vegetation that looks like chaparral with columnar cactus and Jubaeas, like in the Parque Nacional La Campana , sector Ocoa. 

Some pics of Santiago, with Jubaeas, giant Phoenix canariensis and Jubaea

DSCN8502.JPG

DSCN8500.JPG

DSCN8535.JPG

DSCN8485.JPG

  • Like 6
  • Upvote 17

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Jardim Botanico Nacional in Viña del Mar. Some healthy Juania australis and others not so....

A row of Araucaria angustifolia [the state tree of my state Paraná], giant eucallyptus, a moai from the isla Pascua

DSCN8596.JPG

DSCN8595.JPG

DSCN8599.JPG

DSCN8577.JPG

DSCN8572.JPG

DSCN8613.JPG

DSCN8620.JPG

DSCN8644.JPG

  • Like 4
  • Upvote 14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

A one day trip to the winter sport resorts Vale Nevado and Farellones

DSCN8678.JPG

DSCN8663.JPG

DSCN8667.JPG

DSCN8729.JPG

DSCN8713.JPG

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

mas mas mas

 

:drool::drool::drool:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Friday night Santiago had a big snow storm. The last time it snowed in the city was 16 years ago.We where heading again to Farellones.But today a totally different landscape

DSCN8868.JPG

DSCN8888.JPG

DSCN8942.JPG

 

DSCN9140.JPG

DSCN9209.JPG

DSCN9225.JPG

DSCN9174.JPG

DSCN9055.JPG

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

DSCN9310.JPG

DSCN9289.JPG

 

DSCN9246.JPG

DSCN9329.JPG

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Monday 17, was our last day in Chile and we went to the Parque Nacional La Campana - sector Ocoa. With our guide Jorge from ''Jorge Excurciones'' we climbed  to a cascade in the park, a walk of 2 h 30 min and and 1 h 10 min hours back to the park entrance. It was my dream to know this fantastic place , a ''Patrimonio de la Biosfera''. Big centuries old Jubaeas and also younger palms, a lot of interesting plants like Trichocereus , Puya berteroana, Puya chilensis. I saw a tree that is also native to my place in Paraná, Drimys winteri . A wonderfull flora located in breathtaking location.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Campana_National_Park    

a Campana National Park is located in the Cordillera de la CostaQuillota Province, in the Valparaíso Region of Chile. La Campana National Park and the Vizcachas Mountains lie northwest of Santiago.[2] This national park covers approximately 80 square kilometres (31 sq mi) and is home to one of the last palm forests of Jubaea chilensis (Chilean Wine Palm), which prehistorically had a much wider distribution than at present.[3] Another attraction is the Cerro La Campana, which lends its name to the park. In 1834 Charles Darwin climbed this mountain, during the second voyage of HMS Beagle.

In 1984, the park, along with Lago Peñuelas National Reserve, was designated by UNESCO as a Biosphere Reserve.

DSCN9450.JPG

DSCN9448.JPG

DSCN9459.JPG

DSCN9463.JPG

DSCN9480.JPG

DSCN9476.JPG

DSCN9466.JPG

DSCN9482.JPG

DSCN9486.JPG

DSCN9490.JPG

DSCN9496.JPG

DSCN9500.JPG

  • Like 6
  • Upvote 19

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Strange to see cattle grazing inside the park. I´m not sure if this is ''carelessness''  or has an ecological  purpose to substitute the effects of ancient animals that actually are absent like alpacas etc....

At 1;00 pm we ate someting at the side og this stream

DSCN9502.JPG

DSCN9504.JPG

DSCN9506.JPG

DSCN9522.JPG

DSCN9530.JPG

DSCN9512.JPG

DSCN9532.JPG

DSCN9536.JPG

DSCN9539.JPG

DSCN9546.JPG

DSCN9548.JPG

DSCN9549.JPG

  • Like 7
  • Upvote 16

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jdiaz31089

Wow great photos! Obrigado!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

DSCN9566.JPG

DSCN9577.JPG

DSCN9590.JPG

DSCN9594.JPG

DSCN9608.JPG

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 18

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Some curiosities

We found this dwarfish Jubaea growing on a hill of pure rock. I don´t know how it can survive this harsh conditions....

There was still some snow from the big snowfall from two days ago. The temperature during our trip was pleasent, cold only in the shadow. Our guide told us that the day before the temperatures were negative in the Parque La Campana the whole day.

DSCN9615.JPG

DSCN9616.JPG

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

''La tierra no pertenece al hombre. El hombre pertenece a la tierra''

''The earth isn´t mankinds [ man´s] property, Mankind [the man] belongs to the earth.''

[In memory of the chilean visionary Sir Raul Ovalle Ugarte and family who in 1968 donated there property Las Palmas de Ocoa to the Nation as natural heritage to be preserved for the future generations]


 

]

DSCN9457.JPG

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darold Petty

Alberto,  Thank you very much for these wonderful photographs !  :greenthumb:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Wonderful photos! Chile has stunning natural beauty. What a joy to see palms and plants I will probably never see in person.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GottmitAlex

Well, now I know Jubaea Chilensis is snow hardy. 

Thank you for the pictures. That was one magnificent trip.

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jubaea

Thank you for posting some great pictures.  Did you see any small non trunking Jubaea?  I have wondered what kinds of animals disperse the seed.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palmaceae

Beautiful country! It is cool to see snow on palms.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto
1 hour ago, Jubaea said:

Thank you for posting some great pictures.  Did you see any small non trunking Jubaea?  I have wondered what kinds of animals disperse the seed.

Yes I  saw young Jubaeas and also little seedlings protected with a wire fence. Here is younger one growing in some shade

DSCN9528.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto
2 hours ago, Jubaea said:

Thank you for posting some great pictures.  Did you see any small non trunking Jubaea?  I have wondered what kinds of animals disperse the seed.

Yes I  saw young Jubaeas and also little seedlings protected with a wire fence. Here is younger one growing in some shade. I didn´t find any mature fruits, but lots of seeds opened by a kind of rodent our guide told us.

DSCN9528.JPG

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto
2 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Well, now I know Jubaea Chilensis is snow hardy. 

Thank you for the pictures. That was one magnificent trip.

 

I saw a lot of broken fronds on the Phoenix canariensis and other trees in Santiago the following day of the snow. But this was the only Jubaea I saw with a broken frond in La Campana. It is certainly adapted to some heavy snow. 

DSCN9601.JPG

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto
2 hours ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Wonderful photos! Chile has stunning natural beauty. What a joy to see palms and plants I will probably never see in person.

Meg, never say never:D

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sbpalms

Wow! Chile is so beautiful. I loved the pictures!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
realarch

Thanks for the photos Alberto, looks like beautiful and scenic country. The Jubaea are so monumental.

Tim

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keith N Tampa (ex SoJax)

Wow, what a great set of photos!  Maybe I will get to visit there some day.  That snow looked heavy and wet.  I wonder if the Phoenix canariensis will defoliate?  If I lived there, I'd grow Jubaea.  Who needs CIDP when Jubaea grow into such wonderful specimens?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

Fantastic Alberto!! It looked like a great day for the hike. Just cool enough to keep you comfortable while you hiked, the best times and AMAZING scenery!! To think I have one of those monsters still not trunking in my front yard!

Thank you for the posting!!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palmfriend

From here a big THANK YOU as well, Alberto!

It is just great to let us join your wonderful trip and enjoy the awesome scenery and plant photos you took!

A great lecture - I really enjoyed it, gracias -

best regards

Lars

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
topwater

Wow, great pics of a great palm.  Supposedly Charles Darwin thought Jubaea was one of the ugliest trees he had ever seen, it makes me laugh every time I look at one.  He may have been a great biologist but the man had no taste for palms, at all.  

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chatta

Wow! amazing photos! I love Andean cacti and palms :) I haven't seen many Chilean landscapes so this was really cool!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
necturus

Great pictures. What species are the cactus?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto
1 hour ago, necturus said:

Great pictures. What species are the cactus?

They are Echinocereus [Echinopsis] chiloensis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gileno Machado

Excellent coverage Albert. We were there last year but it didn't snow at all

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Unforgetable trip

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bgl

Thanks, Alberto! Great to see all your photos since I was just there last week! Amazing place indeed! :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
daxin
On 7/21/2017 at 4:49 PM, Alberto said:

Strange to see cattle grazing inside the park. I´m not sure if this is ''carelessness''  or has an ecological  purpose to substitute the effects of ancient animals that actually are absent like alpacas etc....

At 1;00 pm we ate someting at the side og this stream

 

DSCN9532.JPG

Thank you Alberto for the photo tour. This silver Jubaea picture is my favorite. It looks like a giant magical windmill, so perfect against the blue sky.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto
10 minutes ago, daxin said:

 

Yes, it's also my favourite!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JasonD

Thank you for this fantastic post. Yours are some of the best shots of Ocoa / La Campana National Park I have seen. And the dusting of snow on the ridgetop behind the jubaeas adds a new feature to the scene.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • UK_Palms
      By UK_Palms
      So I had a couple of hours spare and challenged myself to see as many palms as possible in the Richmond area of London, which is in the southeast of capital. I have put together a photo-documented record of palms in this vicinity of the city and their progress up to now.
      First up, Butia Odorata…





      This Jubaea is something else



       
      The Brahea Armata is getting bigger


       
      Butia Yatay

       
      Parajubaea Cocoides growing under the Yatay

       
      Chamaerops Humilis


       
      Trachycarpus



       
      Trithrinax Campestris

       
      Washingtonia and smaller Jubaea


       
      Yucca Elephantipes, one of the most common exotic plants in London


       
      Typical London CIDP



       
      I had to visit the two Kew/Richmond Robusta’s up close. The neighbour’s front yard has had all the big Trachy’s and Chamaerops cut down though!





       
      Another Brahea Armata



       
      It was a mild early February day in southeast London…



       
      Trachy’s aplenty…


       
      CIDP’s aplenty too…



       
      Terrific washingtonia lurking down a side road in Mitcham…


       
      Spotted a few more CIDP’s as well…


       
      I actually missed quite a few palms off, but I can’t complain given the decent haul I managed to view  and photograph still, all in the space of about 2-3 hours. That also included a stop at Richmond Park for lunch too, so it was a fairly productive visit. 
    • UK_Palms
      By UK_Palms
      All of these ones are in London only. I will do a second upload for the other UK ones because there are already too many for London alone.
      Starting with the Jubaea's first, these ones are located in Richmond, southeast London...





       
      Street view Jubaea's...


       
      Here is the Jubaea at Chelsea Physic Garden in central London, which I visited over the summer...


       

       
      Battersea Park Jubaea's in central London...



       
      North London Jubaea with big Washingtonia Filifera...

       
      Some smaller London Jubaea's on street view...


       
      Now onto the London Butia's, of which there are many to document. Here's the one at Chelsea Physic Garden next to that Jubaea I posted before...















       



       
      This Butia is located in Chumleigh Gardens which is in Burgess Park, south London...

       
      This CIDP is located right next to the Butia above, in Burgess Park, south London. You can see the Butia in the background. It is yet another London CIDP that I haven't even posted before yet. These are not recent images either. This CIDP photo from Chumleigh Gardens is 5 years old now, so it will be much, much bigger, as will the Butia...

       
      11 Monmouth Road, London...

       
      These are in Richmond, southeast London...


       
      Butia Yatay, Richmond

       
      Butia hybrid? Central London...


       
      I can't remember what part of London this Butia is located in? I know I have seen someone post it on here before though, a few years back. 

       
      This one is in Wisley Gardens on the outskirts of southeast London...


       
      Strange planting in central London...
       
      Again these ones are just London so far. I've probably missed a bunch. I will upload the Jubaea's and Butia's from the rest of the UK soon, as well as any other London ones that I forgot. 
    • CodyORB
      By CodyORB
      I soaked them for 3 days (May 3-5) and placed in a 4:1 mixture of perlite and peat moss. 28 seeds split into 5 pots, 1 indoors (around 78F) and 4 outdoors (around 90F day - 75F night). Was expecting to wait 6 months to a year for germination. Surprisingly, the first to sprout was in the indoor pot! Since then I've moved all 5 into the garage (80's-90'sF) and I look forward to more action!
      A quick question, when is a good time to transplant it into its own pot with more nutritious soil?

    • Marc
      By Marc
      How does one tell 5 gallon jubaea from beccariophoenix alfredii?  I have inadvertently commingled some, and while there are noticeable differences when these palms get larger (such as yellow petioles for the beccariophoenix alfredii, and the jubaea fronds and leaflets are stiffer), for smaller plants I'm having difficulty telling them apart.  Does anyone have some easy keys for differentiating them?
       
      Marc
    • Darren Michael
      By Darren Michael
      Hello, I'm planning a trip to Chile this November and am interested in seeing Juania australis and/or Jubaea chilensis in habitat. On Juania I haven't been able to find out if the remaining wild specimens are still visible by regular visitors to Robinson Crusoe, and if so, exactly where (though there don't seem to be many hiking options to begin with). For Jubaea, it seems Parque Nacional La Campana is the best spot, at least as far as large protected areas, but I wanted to make sure that there aren't any better but more obscure/still accessible locations.
      Thanks!
      Darren
       
×
×
  • Create New...