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Xerarch

Sad Truth About Juania australis.....Maybe

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Xerarch

So, Juania australis is one of those super rare palms that many a collector would like to have, it's even cold hardy, although not heat tolerant. But that isn't the biggest problem with it, here goes...sigh....it isn't that awesome! Every photo I see of it, it seems, so.....lackluster. Seriously, it doesn't look that cool in all the photos, that is, until the most recent publication of Palms from the IPS. There actually some pretty sweet specimens this time, and the leaf scars are actually pretty widely spaced, so maybe it's isn't always such a slow grower? At least after it gets some size?

Anyway I'll never have one because of the rareity and cultural requirements, but my opinion of this palm has improved after seeing some nicer specimens in habitat on its native Robinson Crusoe island.  Wonder if anyone else has a similar opinion. 

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realarch

I've had similar opinions of this palm until seeing the most recent article in Palms, where I must say, looks beautiful in habit. 

The palm didn't  look all that attractive from the previous photos I've seen as they were probably taken from specimens outside it's narrow environmental conditions. Pretty narley and a tough grow was my thought.

That said, and living in Hilo, it would be the poster child of what NOT to grow in my garden. 

Tim

 

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PalmatierMeg

It has the reputation of being pretty homely for the most difficult palm to grow in the world. There's probably a lesson to be learned from that. The spectacular photos in the Palms Journal show us maybe this species will never be happy except on its windblown, chilly island.

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Darold Petty

Here are my comments from another thread;

I raised the five Juania palms from seedlings to large, 5-gallon size.  I installed them as a small grove near one another so as to increase the odds for pollination.  They grew well, but two were killed by vandalism, and the remaining three died by the normal  "Juania Death Syndrome". 

 (This is when the palm grows well for several years and then dies suddenly without warning.)  The last one to die had about 24 inches of real trunk, approx. 5 inches in diameter.

  This tendency is why I do not attempt to grow Juania in my garden.  Any Ceroxylon is easier, more dependable, and better looking.

 .

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Xerarch
On 7/9/2017, 8:26:05, Xerarch said:

So, Juania australis is one of those super rare palms that many a collector would like to have, it's even cold hardy, although not heat tolerant. But that isn't the biggest problem with it, here goes...sigh....it isn't that awesome! Every photo I see of it, it seems, so.....lackluster. Seriously, it doesn't look that cool in all the photos, that is, until the most recent publication of Palms from the IPS. There actually some pretty sweet specimens this time, and the leaf scars are actually pretty widely spaced, so maybe it's isn't always such a slow grower? At least after it gets some size?

Anyway I'll never have one because of the rareity and cultural requirements, but my opinion of this palm has improved after seeing some nicer specimens in habitat on its native Robinson Crusoe island.  Wonder if anyone else has a similar opinion. 

Everyone knows it has a fickle reputation for cultural requirements but maybe its worse than I thought, maybe it can only look it's best in habitat. Let me know if anyone in the world has one that equals these latest photos from Palms.  If not, it is truly a unique palm indeed, with little hope of thriving off the island. I guess I can appreciate it for what it is, whatever it is. 

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Flow

As a small, potted plant it is easy peasy lemon squeezy where I live and I find it quite attractive. I have germinated and subequently killed many Ceroxylons but the Juania remains strong. Not the fastest grower and it is not hardy enough to go into the ground here so I will probably never be able to plant it and see whether it suddenly succumbs. But perhaps that only happens in places with nights that are too warm?

Edited by Flow

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Plantasexoticas

I've not seen this latest publication but I have always found the palm attractive. I have many from seed that hopefully do not succumb to any health issues but time will tell.

i know someone who recently visited the one in Ireland and sent me some photos and it seems to be doing quite well and has flowered 

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