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Jeff_Cabinda

To share them as babies and get comments / questions, if any... Thank you 

Phoenix rupicola

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis

Sabal mexicana

Caryota maxima "himalaya"

Phoenix canariensis

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Patrick

That Caryota sure looks cute!

 

I just looked at your location and you should be able to grow almost ANYTHING!

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Jeff_Cabinda
3 hours ago, Patrick said:

That Caryota sure looks cute!

 

I just looked at your location and you should be able to grow almost ANYTHING!

Nice to read that about the caryota... i was expecting a quicker start for a supposed giant. Seeds planted in October 2016. 8 month old if I am still "good" in mathematics

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doranakandawatta

Nice babies

I just hope you don't have too many animals who risk to destroy these small seedlings you plant directly in the soil . 

Looking forward to seeing new pics of the growth progress.

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Fusca

Very nice!  I have a few Sabal mexicana that have only 1 or 2 more leaves than yours.  They are still in containers since I germinated them from seed in 2012!  Hopefully you'll get faster growth in the ground!  My Sabal "Riverside" is only 2 years old from seed and almost the same size as my mexicanas so it is much faster in my experience.  Hope they do well for you! 

Jon

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Jeff_Cabinda
15 hours ago, doranakandawatta said:

Nice babies

I just hope you don't have too many animals who risk to destroy these small seedlings you plant directly in the soil . 

Looking forward to seeing new pics of the growth progress.

Only dogs urinating on them.... or children... i warned them several times !!!

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Jeff_Cabinda
12 hours ago, Fusca said:

Very nice!  I have a few Sabal mexicana that have only 1 or 2 more leaves than yours.  They are still in containers since I germinated them from seed in 2012!  Hopefully you'll get faster growth in the ground!  My Sabal "Riverside" is only 2 years old from seed and almost the same size as my mexicanas so it is much faster in my experience.  Hope they do well for you! 

Jon

Thanks Jon. Then sabal mexicana takes its time... Good news. I can notice an unusual root system on it. I do not know if it is normal and if the ground level is too high or low. You can see it on the sabal picture

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Alberto

Very nice seedlings. I rember my excitment when I first planted out my seed grown babies. 

BTW Where is Cabinda?

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Alberto
3 hours ago, Jeff_Cabinda said:

Only dogs urinating on them.... or children... i warned them several times !!!

Dog pee is pure acid

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Jeff_Cabinda
On Wed Jun 28 2017 16:15:41 GMT+0100, Alberto said:

Very nice seedlings. I rember my excitment when I first planted out my seed grown babies. 

BTW Where is Cabinda?

Cabinda is at the mouth of congo river between congo and Zaire.  6 degree south. West african coast. 

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Pal Meir

I have found an old pic of a potted Sabal mexicana ("texana") seedling, 2 years and a couple of months old; I guess your Sabal will grow a bit faster in Cabinda: :D

5967d0b4b945e_Sabaltexana84N01-0107.thum

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foxtail
On 6/28/2017, 7:44:37, Jeff_Cabinda said:

 I can notice an unusual root system on it. I do not know if it is normal and if the ground level is too high or low. You can see it on the sabal picture

Totally normal,  is a tillering palm, it exhibits saxophone style root growth (it has a heel), keep top third of heel above soil elevation - palmpedia.

http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Sabal_mexicana

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