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Jdiaz31089

Dudleya farinosa - habitat photos

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Jdiaz31089

 I was hiking at the Kings Range in Northern California and took some pictures of the native dudleys farinosa. I thought I'd share these with you here. 

There were two distinct forms - a green form and a white form

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And they grew in large colonies on west-facing cliff sides. 

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Jdiaz31089

There is very little temperature variation here. Cool and foggy in the morning, warm and clear during the day. I wonder if Rhopalostylis would like it here?

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Tracy
18 hours ago, Jdiaz31089 said:

There is very little temperature variation here. Cool and foggy in the morning, warm and clear during the day. I wonder if Rhopalostylis would like it here?

Somewhere on the Central Coast it appears, and it looks to me like still below the northern latitude equivalence of the southern latitude that Rhopalostylis grows in it's native habitat.  I'm sure that if you planted some there they would do just fine!  The marine layer right over the water look reminiscent of my weekend.  We could see there was blue sky just a few hundred yards to our east, but we had our "air conditioning" machine working, a nice marine layer filtering some of the sun's heat, making it just comfortable.  My Rhopalostylis weren't arguing!

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Jdiaz31089
16 minutes ago, Tracy said:

Somewhere on the Central Coast it appears, and it looks to me like still below the northern latitude equivalence of the southern latitude that Rhopalostylis grows in it's native habitat.  I'm sure that if you planted some there they would do just fine!  The marine layer right over the water look reminiscent of my weekend.  We could see there was blue sky just a few hundred yards to our east, but we had our "air conditioning" machine working, a nice marine layer filtering some of the sun's heat, making it just comfortable.  My Rhopalostylis weren't arguing!

North coast actually! about 120 miles south of the California/Oregon border. I've been here in mid-winter as well as in mid-summer and there is virtually no difference, except perhaps more precipitation during the winter months. I think that I could be tempted to plant a small grove of seedlings in a ravine, along one of the many creeks that flow down the range into the ocean. 

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Cindy Adair

My kind of hike! Thanks!

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Hillizard

Succulent Smugglers Descend on California: https://www.newyorker.com/news/california-chronicles/succulent-smugglers-descend-on-california

"Succulents—drought-friendly, fireproof, angular, Zen—long ago attained the status of design cliché, a living version of the shag rug, Heath mug, Eames chair. But now a particular species, Dudleya farinosa (stage name: Powdery Liveforever), a wild roseate plant with silvery, pink-tipped leaves and a spectacular yellow-flowered stalk, which thrives on California’s coastal bluffs, has become the It Plant for succulent thieves. Last week, in Monterey County, two Dudleya poachers, a married couple, pleaded no contest to charges including felony grand theft and felony vandalism related to their removal of more than eighteen hundred plants from Garrapata State Park, in Big Sur. It was the fourth successful Dudleya prosecution in California in a little more than a year."

 "'I’d call it a poaching trend,' Captain Patrick Foy, of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, told me. The thefts, he said, are driven by emerging demand for Dudleya of all kinds in Asia, where a mature plant can command a price of up to a hundred dollars. 'There are people who book a flight from Korea or China, and they literally fly in, rent a car, stop by a moving store to buy huge numbers of boxes, and then drive up the coast.' Various species of Dudleya are found from Oregon to Mexico. 'They harvest the plants, process everything in a hotel room, oftentimes, and ship them back to nurseries in Korea and China,' he said."

Dudleya.png

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Gonzer

Two words for poachers like that.....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hang-em-high-1968-2.jpg

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Hillizard
1 hour ago, Gonzer said:

Two words for poachers like that.....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hang-em-high-1968-2.jpg

Gonzer: That might be a bit extreme, but I agree with your sentiments! :rage:

 

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Gonzer

Dudleyas occupy a special place in my heart as they were one of the first plants that grabbed my attention in the early 70's. D. attenuata and it's many volunteer seedlings still grow year after year in the yard. Other more uncommon species reside in the Dudleya Container Ranch (DCR). Once upon a time someone I knew "rescued" a few large specimens from a bulldozer's path only to ask me later why they all died after initially transplanting successfully. He said he gave them plenty of water when they shriveled up in the summer. (!!!!!!!!!!) 

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Missi
18 hours ago, Hillizard said:

Succulent Smugglers Descend on California: https://www.newyorker.com/news/california-chronicles/succulent-smugglers-descend-on-california

"Succulents—drought-friendly, fireproof, angular, Zen—long ago attained the status of design cliché, a living version of the shag rug, Heath mug, Eames chair. But now a particular species, Dudleya farinosa (stage name: Powdery Liveforever), a wild roseate plant with silvery, pink-tipped leaves and a spectacular yellow-flowered stalk, which thrives on California’s coastal bluffs, has become the It Plant for succulent thieves. Last week, in Monterey County, two Dudleya poachers, a married couple, pleaded no contest to charges including felony grand theft and felony vandalism related to their removal of more than eighteen hundred plants from Garrapata State Park, in Big Sur. It was the fourth successful Dudleya prosecution in California in a little more than a year."

 "'I’d call it a poaching trend,' Captain Patrick Foy, of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, told me. The thefts, he said, are driven by emerging demand for Dudleya of all kinds in Asia, where a mature plant can command a price of up to a hundred dollars. 'There are people who book a flight from Korea or China, and they literally fly in, rent a car, stop by a moving store to buy huge numbers of boxes, and then drive up the coast.' Various species of Dudleya are found from Oregon to Mexico. 'They harvest the plants, process everything in a hotel room, oftentimes, and ship them back to nurseries in Korea and China,' he said."

 

Eighteen-hundred plants....:rant::rant::rant:

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Hillizard
7 hours ago, Missi said:

Eighteen-hundred plants....:rant::rant::rant:

Right. Which means a decrease in the natural population, which has measurable effects on the process of individuals in this genus reproducing/replacing themselves over time. They join many palms and other plants in an uncertain future. :(

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Hillizard
10 hours ago, Gonzer said:

Dudleyas occupy a special place in my heart as they were one of the first plants that grabbed my attention in the early 70's. D. attenuata and it's many volunteer seedlings still grow year after year in the yard. Other more uncommon species reside in the Dudleya Container Ranch (DCR). Once upon a time someone I knew "rescued" a few large specimens from a bulldozer's path only to ask me later why they all died after initially transplanting successfully. He said he gave them plenty of water when they shriveled up in the summer. (!!!!!!!!!!) 

I've never had much success in the past growing Dudleyas (bought from nursery sources BTW). They always seem to decline after a year or so, but I keep trying. They may require more "tough love" (drought) in the summer than I can stand. :unsure:

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Gonzer

In the summer, when they're dried and shriveled, don't be charmed by their little voices crying "Water, Water!". Ignore them. California native succulents only get water when Ma Nature's feeing benevolent.

 

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Josue Diaz
16 hours ago, Hillizard said:

I've never had much success in the past growing Dudleyas (bought from nursery sources BTW). They always seem to decline after a year or so, but I keep trying. They may require more "tough love" (drought) in the summer than I can stand. :unsure:

I grow mine where they get morning sun only. I have pulverulenta and crymosa. 

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