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Cindy Adair

For learning about a genus it is easier for me to see different related species nearby.

However aesthetically I would much rather have several of the same species together, but not too close to similar ones. 

Thus I plan to put my two C. sullivaniorum seedlings

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 in a different spot than my 5 little C. tuerckheimii trees (3 girls, 1 boy and 1 unknown)

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I have heard that many Coccothrinax species interbreed easily.

Is that of any concern between Chamaedoreas or within the Licualas?

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Sadly only one lonely C. amabilis.... Unless any of you have a source of more?

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2 C. frondosas although I think I have a third somewhere.

As to Licualas, right now my 1 L. cordata (bottom left) and 2 L. orbicularis look alike to me, but no flowers yet.

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Or should I worry more about the chance of snow in the tropics than hybridization of most palms? Thanks!

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stone jaguar

Snow in PR, for sure. I have grown all of the chams you show in large numbers and in side-by-side settings in both Guatemala and California for years with no hybridization evident. In the case of my garden in Guatemala, native pollinators were certainly present. Indeed, even with careful and eye-straining, time-consuming hand-pollination of those species, success rates are low to nil for most growers.

Plants look great, BTW.

J

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Mandrew968

Dang Cindy! Big time post there, with your species name drop! As far as Licuala, there is no need to worry about hybridization. Almost the same goes for Chamaedorea. Though there are hybrids, it doesn't happen all on it's own, 99% of the time. With Coccos, it seems no matter how far away you place them, the seed is never pure...

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Cindy Adair
4 hours ago, stone jaguar said:

Snow in PR, for sure. I have grown all of the chams you show in large numbers and in side-by-side settings in both Guatemala and California for years with no hybridization evident. In the case of my garden in Guatemala, native pollinators were certainly present. Indeed, even with careful and eye-straining, time-consuming hand-pollination of those species, success rates are low to nil for most growers.

Plants look great, BTW.

J

Thanks so much for the information and compliment.

 I have seen photos of your plants over the years and they are amazing! I hope those PR pollinators are plentiful and eager to get to work.

I'd like a forest of each of these and some to share with others here too!

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Cindy Adair
1 hour ago, Mandrew968 said:

Dang Cindy! Big time post there, with your species name drop! As far as Licuala, there is no need to worry about hybridization. Almost the same goes for Chamaedorea. Though there are hybrids, it doesn't happen all on it's own, 99% of the time. With Coccos, it seems no matter how far away you place them, the seed is never pure...

I don't really have very many Chamaedoreas and clearly should have started with at least 5-7 of each instead of my cheapskate 3. I was able to add the 2 potato chip trees over the last couple of years, but odds are against getting both sexes on most of my others unless I can add more.

I am glad Licualas are not dioecious, not that I would not still prefer to have several of each species since I like them so much.

Wonder why some species hybridize easily and many never? Anybody here know?

What other genera share this trait with Coccothrinax?

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Mandrew968
1 hour ago, Cindy Adair said:

I don't really have very many Chamaedoreas and clearly should have started with at least 5-7 of each instead of my cheapskate 3. I was able to add the 2 potato chip trees over the last couple of years, but odds are against getting both sexes on most of my others unless I can add more.

I am glad Licualas are not dioecious, not that I would not still prefer to have several of each species since I like them so much.

Wonder why some species hybridize easily and many never? Anybody here know?

What other genera share this trait with Coccothrinax?

Cindy, how nice of you to ask such a simple question! Lol. There are many factors including pollen make up/consistency, size and shape of the flowers, and how close they are to one another... Other very promiscuous palm genera would be Copernicia, Attalea, Syagrus, and Livistona (to name a few...) ok, time for bed!

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BS Man about Palms

Excellent collection Cindy!! I'm VERY jealous of your sullivanoriums!! The most I saw at once was a trip to Pauleens poolhouse where she had at least 5.. Good luck!

 

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Cindy Adair
11 hours ago, Mandrew968 said:

Cindy, how nice of you to ask such a simple question! Lol. There are many factors including pollen make up/consistency, size and shape of the flowers, and how close they are to one another... Other very promiscuous palm genera would be Copernicia, Attalea, Syagrus, and Livistona (to name a few...) ok, time for bed!

Thanks Andrew! I have no Attaleas (yet) and only one Syagrus now (vermicularis) and a couple of Livistonas (nitida and saribus). However I have enough Copernicias to perhaps at least segregate them to different quadrants.

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Cindy Adair
6 hours ago, BS Man about Palms said:

Excellent collection Cindy!! I'm VERY jealous of your sullivanoriums!! The most I saw at once was a trip to Pauleens poolhouse where she had at least 5.. Good luck!

 

Thanks Bill. I am jealous that you got to meet their namesake, Pauleen plus have local Palm societies. Alway trade-offs....

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LivistonaFan
On 6/2/2017 at 7:47 PM, stone jaguar said:

even with careful and eye-straining, time-consuming hand-pollination of those species, success rates are low to nil for most growers.

Does this mean that there is no real chance to hybridize my Chamaedorea Microspadix (left) with my Chamaedorea Radicalis 'Arborescent (right)? Not that I would mean to produce a very good-looking palm but these would be my first produced hybrids:w00t:.

I read on palmpedia that Chamaedoreas are diecious. Are those inflorescences by any chance male and female and which is which?

radicalis_et_microspadix.thumb.JPG.72f6989afb25cdca46381a2726876412.JPG

Chamaedorea Microspadix flower (second time this year)

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C. Radicalis arborescent (first time ever)

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Edited by LivistonaFan

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Phoenikakias

Inflorescence of radicalis is female.  The other one is still hidden in the peduncular bract and therefore I can not tell yet.

Edited by Phoenikakias
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Phoenikakias

These are probably hybrids of C glaucifolia with another sp, either costaricana, or elegans or microspadix.  Out of 30 seeds I had gathered from my glaucifolia only 4 or 5 have germinated so far and those after many, many months.  Even more interestingly ungerminated seeds refuse to rot either. I wonder if it an indication of hybridization difficulty of seeds to germinate. Unless of course it is rare but possible that some flowers are hermaphrodite.

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